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Ripmyfly
01-17-2009, 10:43 PM
Anyone know the scope on this guy. It appears he's living the dream.

YouTube - Eustace Conway - a modern day Daniel Boone (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lfk4ifx-8jw)

sbkittrell
01-17-2009, 11:20 PM
DAG! I just got me a new hero! He's from MY state too. Thanks Rip, you just made my day.

Rubarb
01-18-2009, 04:53 AM
Now that's a lifestyle i would really enjoy, greatest respect to the guy for doing what he wanted.

Sgt. Mac
01-18-2009, 09:21 AM
Good for him, course now I'm jealous as hell lol

Trekon86
01-18-2009, 10:41 AM
Wow that's really cool!
PMZ

GreyOne
01-18-2009, 11:17 AM
Truly inspiring!

Andy
01-18-2009, 12:46 PM
Hearing of this guy brought tears to my eyes.

I feel like I have somewhat thrown my life away. :o

Faol
01-18-2009, 12:58 PM
Thanks for posting this video. My daughter will be graduating this year from high school and is planning on moving to be with her "friend".

For years I have thought about just heading out and seeing what I could get into. I just turned 40 in November and I do miss the adventures I had when I was in the military. I guess I have a bit of wanderlust, as many of you do; however, a family certainly tempers that. After the end of the year I will probably not have any strings left of that sort.

I have seen a lot of the rest of the world and would like to see my own country. His story is certainly a motivation.

I actually feel the same way you do Andy, although I am happy to have raised my daughter.

Jason
01-18-2009, 01:03 PM
He seems like a really interesting guy. He's done so many things already. I hope some good woman finds his lifestyle an attractive option so he can start his family. Thanks for the post. :)

Riverrat
01-18-2009, 02:07 PM
The man is an inspriation.....he lives the life many of us would love to.

Tomahawk
01-18-2009, 02:09 PM
Read the book "The last American Man" by Elizabeth Gilbert.

THe book covers the life of Eustace Conway but it is written in such a way that suggests the author was really into Eustace.

anyh,, here is a link.............http://elizabethgilbert.com/thelastamericanman.htm

here is a link to the Turtle Island Preserve owned by Conway http://www.turtleislandpreserve.com/index.php

tomahawk

Oblio13
01-18-2009, 02:26 PM
It's a good book, right up our alley and very entertaining. The dude has some serious character flaws, but that only adds to the story, and of course so do we all. Well, you guys anyways.

Faol
01-18-2009, 02:28 PM
It's a good book, right up our alley and very entertaining. The dude has some serious character flaws, but that only adds to the story, and of course so do we all. Well, you guys anyways.

LOL....I may have one or two.

Tomahawk
01-18-2009, 02:29 PM
It's a good book, right up our alley and very entertaining. The dude has some serious character flaws, but that only adds to the story, and of course so do we all. Well, you guys anyways.

Yup, Im a misfit , i admit it. hahaha.

tomahawk

Stripes
01-18-2009, 06:26 PM
Well, Eustace is great for what he is. At 40 he wishes he had a family to share it with. We can all be a Eustace in our own way. Enjoy what you have... strive for what you want. It is all under the stars... reach up and grab a hold....
Respectfully,
Stripes

bmatt
01-19-2009, 03:21 AM
Here are two paragraphs from an article I just found:

"His flaw is a crippling one. He is indeed powerful, smart and charismatic. Nor is he ever anything less than honest or authentic in his dealings with others. He does indeed know how to live in harmony with the natural world, and desperately wishes to lead an entire nation to the same goal. It is other people he has trouble with. As Gilbert draws his character, Conway simply cannot tolerate a harmony in which different voices blend. Everyone must sing the same tune in his chorus. Discussing his difficulty in finding people who can function well at Turtle Island, he says: ''People get mad and say, 'Eustace thinks his way is the only way.' Well, that's true. My way is the only way. And I believe the best work is done when people surrender to one authority, like in the military.'' He continues, ''If I was the general of an army, for instance, the discipline would be more organized and I could insist that everyone do exactly what I said, and then things would run properly.'' This is a grown man speaking, with no trace of humor or self-deprecation. He could probably survive if dropped naked into any forest in North America, but he is, as any 10-year-old could tell you, completely clueless."

"... He is indeed intoxicating in his strength, his resourcefulness and his will to pursue not merely survival but beauty. But his weaknesses emerge inevitably. He is driven to achieve, to proselytize, to educate. It's no surprise that nobody can measure up. In the end, he sounds more and more like his father. Women leave him time and again because he cannot stop telling them what to do and how to do it. His brother, who rode across America with him, says, ''The bottom line's the same -- he has to get his way all the time, and there's no talking through it.'' In describing one of his troubled love affairs, Gilbert describes an internal war between ''the two things he craves most: absolute love and absolute control.'' If he is indeed the model of a certain kind of American manhood, it is one more sad than thrilling."

Looks like he grew up very much in some ways, but not in others... I am impressed by what he has done, though.


Article: http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9507E3D81E38F931A35755C0A9649C8B 63&fta=y

sbkittrell
01-19-2009, 07:47 AM
If I understand correctly, he built turtle island. He lived the life. So he wants things his way. So what? He's the one that has succeeded in living the way he has. He's the one who knows how to do it. OK, most women won't tolerate his eighteen and nineteen century personality, but it sounds to me like he's a nineteenth century guy. I know lot's of people both male and female who always want things their way. I think lots of people want to put extraordinary people on pedestals. They want them to be perfect, but nobody is. Mr. Conway is not some idealized Daniel Boone. He's a real man with his own personality. That personality is what drove or allowed him to do what he has done and is part of who he is. I wouldn't call that a flaw. It's just him. I hope he finds a "ninteenth" century woman to share his life with, but I'd hate to see him change who he is (or more accurately, pretend to change who he is) just to have a woman with him. There's one or more women out there somewhere that will match up with him perfectly. He'll find her eventually I hope. As far as him never "growing up", I'm glad he didn't because he never would have accomplished what he has, if he had. I never met the man. I never even heard of him until Rip posted this thread, but I wish he was respected for ALL of who he is, not just for what he's done.

In today's society men are being figuratively castrated constantly. Now, I'm no cave man. I understand that women today or more independent and I respect women. Heck, my girlfriend is a retired marine and I love her and respect her more than I can say. But I don't like how society is always putting down guys who are strong and forceful. Just look at most any show on TV and the man in the show is often portrayed as an idiot or monster. Society today (the secular part of it anyway) portrays men as stupid, goofy or evil. They portray children, women as the one's who really know what's right. The guys who are portrayed in a favorable light are often the gay guys. I'm sick of it.

bmatt
01-19-2009, 08:21 AM
SB: He doesn't have an 18th or 19th century personality. He is a control freak as a result of the way his father treated him when he was young. I would have thought that going through as much as he did would have knocked that sh*t out of him and set him straight, but apparently it didn't. Do I blame his dad for this? No! Every person is responsible for themselves.

Always demanding that things be a certain way shows a lack of understanding about the real world and indicates control freak-ism. Sorry, but this is true. It's like a little kid in a toy store throwing a fit because he can't have things be the way he wants them to be.

I admire this guy very much for his skills, perserverance, knowledge, resourcefulness etc. etc. etc. I think it's great that he created a place to be the way he wants and lives the way he wants to. I wish more people would do that. I did it myself, to a large degree. I'm not expecting him to be perfect by any means. I understand that noone is perfect. I don't put anyone on a pedestal. But his frustration with his work and relationships not being as successful as he wants is directly related to the fact that he is overly controlling. Plus, why is it that I have to admire him 100%? Can't I admire the good things and disagree with other things?

"As far as him never "growing up", I'm glad he didn't because he never would have accomplished what he has, if he had." Huh? Why not? This makes no sense. By not growing up, I mean that he has not given up trying to be a control freak/dictator. He could absolutely have stopped trying to control things and still been 100% successful at his outdoor endeavors, and would probably have a great lady right now, as well. In fact, I bet things would have gone more smoothly for him.

I absolutely agree with what you say about how men are portrayed in the media and that men in the US are becoming wimps. Personally, I did not follow that trend. I DO NOT let my wife tell me what to do. I DO NOT tell her what to do. We are a 50/50 partnership. I am masculine and she is feminine. I do "man stuff" and she does "woman stuff". One person in a relationship dominating another is not what love is about, in my opinion. OK, I'm getting down from the soap box now. :)

bmatt
01-19-2009, 08:39 AM
SB: One more thing. I'm not suggesting that this guy should change how he is. Not for a woman, his admirers, his detractors, anybody. He should be how he wants to be. I'm just saying that how he is being has its consequences. You can't smash your hand with a hammer and get upset when it hurts because you didn't want it to.

sbkittrell
01-19-2009, 08:39 AM
Those are good points, bmatt. Plus, since I haven't read the book I may have spoken out of turn. But I believe that "control freak" is not a bad thing in some situations. It's just the way some people are, and sometimes they accomplish great things. Their personal lives might suffer, like Conway's apparently have but a lot of great men were dictatorial. Anyway, I'd better get the book and read it before I start spouting off again. Then I'll either agree with you, or we can debate some more. This would be one dull forum if everybody agreed with everybody else.

bmatt
01-19-2009, 08:45 AM
Those are good points, bmatt. Plus, since I haven't read the book I may have spoken out of turn. But I believe that "control freak" is not a bad thing in some situations. It's just the way some people are, and sometimes they accomplish great things. Their personal lives might suffer, like Conway's apparently have but a lot of great men were dictatorial. Anyway, I'd better get the book and read it before I start spouting off again. Then I'll either agree with you, or we can debate some more. This would be one dull forum if everybody agreed with everybody else.

The thing is, being in control and being a control freak aren't necessarily the same thing. Being a wise leader who has been chosen to make decisions and organize things is one thing (they can do great things), but always demanding that things be a certain way is something else (despised dictators). My assertion is that great things can also be accomplished without being dictatorial.

Honestly, I feel really bad for the guy. I sincerely hope that he is able to find a nice lady to share his life with. I'd love to hear how they grow their school/homestead/family.

You're absolutely right about healthy debating being good and keeping the forum interesting! It's one of the reasons Bushcraft USA is my favorite board. :D