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werewolf won
03-30-2010, 09:39 AM
http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2080326/29075/Rikon-4-x-36-BeltDisc-Sander-Model-50-110.aspx?refcode=10IN04NL


I would like to try putting scales on factory knife blanks. Any knife makers have an opinion of this tool for shaping wood? I could clamp my belt sander to my table, but this machine seems a lot more purpose built and Iím sure a lot safer.

Thanks,
Wolf

SDS
03-30-2010, 09:42 AM
I used one similar to that for awhile. You have to be careful because they only have one speed and you can really mess up your wood in a hurry. Depending on the wood it's pretty easy to burn it too. Watch that disc, it will eat your thumb........FAST.

You really don't need to start with something like that though. If you are just putting handles on premade knife blanks you can do most of your shaping with rasps or wood files and then finish sand by hand. The sander/grinder does speed things up but that isn't always a good thing.

SDS

Skab
03-30-2010, 09:43 AM
I own one that looks very similar to this but is carried by Lowes, I paid the same price, but no shipping. I love it for wood working, too wide for blade work( I think at least). But does all I need it to for woodworking.

werewolf won
03-30-2010, 09:57 AM
I used one similar to that for awhile. You have to be careful because they only have one speed and you can really mess up your wood in a hurry. Depending on the wood it's pretty easy to burn it too. Watch that disc, it will eat your thumb........FAST.

You really don't need to start with something like that though. If you are just putting handles on premade knife blanks you can do most of your shaping with rasps or wood files and then finish sand by hand. The sander/grinder does speed things up but that isn't always a good thing.

SDS

I know what you are saying. The only power tool that ever to bite me was a belt sander. That was much the fault of the incompetent shop teacher, as it was mine; the machine was just doing its job.
Wolf

amcardon
03-30-2010, 09:58 AM
You would be better off with one of these (http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00921513000P?keyword=craftsman+disc+ sander). Belts are 2" wide which is much easier to control and belts will also be more readily available (through trugrit or supergrit which will save you lots of money) and if you get into knife mod/making a lot of beginner makers start out on this grinder.

FGYT
03-30-2010, 10:15 AM
Easy enough to Modify for Making blades etc
for handle shaping you are limited to the Dia of the top wheel for internal curves

heres mine i did a while back before moving on to a Pro Machine

Spilt belts to 2" wide and fitted raised rear platten
fitted angled table adjustable for Scandi grind ranges only

http://i118.photobucket.com/albums/o109/FGYT/Dunc/Dsc_1489.jpg

still slow but faster than Files



now run this same 2" wide belt different angleing system to do all types of grind. Main difference is the power (2HP, 1500w) to run 40gt Ceramic belts etc and multi speed for high grit (1300gt) belts and longer belts 82" Plus

http://i118.photobucket.com/albums/o109/FGYT/Workshop2.jpg

NJStricker
03-30-2010, 12:11 PM
If all you think you'll ever do is shape handles, then you might want to look into the 1x30 from Harbor Freight for around $40.

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=2485

That will leave you with some cash for belts, etc.

If you ever think you might attempt to make your own blades, then go with the 2x42 Craftsman from Sears.

WARNING!!! This is an addictive hobby! Once you start putting handles on knives you may not be able to stop yourself from becoming a knifemaker!!!

amcardon
03-30-2010, 12:13 PM
now run this same 2" wide belt different angleing system to do all types of grind. Main difference is the power (2HP, 1500w) to run 40gt Ceramic belts etc and multi speed for high grit (1300gt) belts and longer belts 82" Plus

I'm jealous... I have a 1x42" Delta that serves me well but I would love a 2x72"...

Troop
03-30-2010, 12:22 PM
If at all possible, get a belt grinder/sander with variable speed.

JustJoel
03-30-2010, 01:33 PM
So if all you are doing is shaping scales once you cut and attach them, I think a couple of good files (1 round and 1 flat), a rasp, and a bunch of sandpaper will be your best option. Contouring and fitting up take a bit more time but you have total control over the process. You can see it happen stroke at a time and adjust as needed. It's tought to accidentally sand off the guard one stroke at a time. :D Just my take on it. Good luck, either way.

Joel

p moore
03-30-2010, 02:12 PM
Warewolf, I would do like some others have sugested. Rasp file and paper. We all must start somewere. If you screw a couple up on fancy equipment you may be discouraged. Do a couple this way, then I would go for the Craftsman. Best bang for the buck.

Amcardon, Build your own.

Tom Krein
03-30-2010, 02:15 PM
As has been pointed out... if you are wanting to TRY it I would suggest rasps, files, and sandpaper.

If you have the extra money to spend on a piece of equipment I would get a bench top drill press. One of the larger bench top models. This will be much more useful, as straight holes are a must for good fit/finish and very difficult to do any other way.

Tom

p moore
03-30-2010, 03:00 PM
Good point!

Paul

Dylside
03-30-2010, 03:56 PM
I started out doing my rough shaping on a sander just like this. Mine is a signle speed thing I got from my grandfather, who no doubt bought it the day they were invented. After some rewiring and refurb, it works like a champ, but not for shaping handles. Using hand tools takes longer, but the results are going to be much more consistent and there's a lot less chance of screwing it up. If you use a rough belt, it'll eat too much wood too fast. If you use a finer grit, it'll burn the wood. Either way, it's really easy to get carried away or otherwise screw up your handle. Try rasps and files first.

amcardon
03-30-2010, 03:56 PM
Amcardon, Build your own.

Yeah, I have a set of plans for the NWG, I just can't spring for the steel/motor/contact wheels right now. All my money goes to med school, leaving very little for my less important hobbies! Well, all my money goes to med school and diapers anyway :D

p moore
03-30-2010, 04:16 PM
I hear you.

Paul

Tom Krein
03-30-2010, 04:17 PM
I would also recommend the book How to Make Knives by Loveless, Barney and Moran. Here is a link... LINK (http://www.amazon.com/How-Make-Knives-MAKE-KNIVES/dp/B001SRHYM6/ref=sr_1_13?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1269983697&sr=8-13)

I would also recommend this book Step-By-Step Knifemaking by Boye, here is a link for it..... LINK (http://www.amazon.com/Step-Step-Knifemaking-You-Can/dp/0615116590/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1269983697&sr=8-2)

This are the best books currently in publication on knifemaking.The first will be ESPECIALLY helpful for you as it has a section on how to make knives with hand tools.

Tom

werewolf won
03-30-2010, 07:59 PM
Thanks for the great responses. I have a good sized shop with a fair number of tools, including a drill press. While I'm no strainger to woodworking, (I build boats and carve decoys.) I have no experience with knives. I wouldn't mind handling a few Green River or other blanks. However, there are too many awesome knive makers out there to be bothered investing the time and money in that hobby. I don't want to start another hobby like metal work.
Wolf

JustJoel
03-30-2010, 08:29 PM
Thanks for the great responses. I have a good sized shop with a fair number of tools, including a drill press. While I'm no strainger to woodworking, (I build boats and carve decoys.) I have no experience with knives. I wouldn't mind handling a few Green River or other blanks. However, there are too many awesome knive makers out there to be bothered investing the time and money in that hobby. I don't want to start another hobby like metal work.
Wolf

Ah. You have a drill press... A drumsander spinning at a good clip is very nice to have when fitting up scales. Sears sells a nice little set with three drums that are very handy. Just be carful not to sand away the handle... :D I recommend making knives over all other hobbies except maybe hunting. All else has fallen short of the glory of the steel... ;)

Joel

Fort Henry Custom Knives
03-30-2010, 09:17 PM
First, I agree the Hand Tools or the HF grinder both would do fine. These are just tools, all they do is save you time. You could do the whole job with Sandpaper alone (again a tool) but it would take a loooong time. :) The grinder or drill press or...whatever will allow you to go faster (obviously) but it will also magnify your mistakes and make them happen faster.

The method will be interesting but your result is what counts.