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easy
09-08-2010, 12:40 PM
Urban Survival

We had an excellent writer for the Chicago Tribune name Mike Royko. He is no longer with us. One thing he wrote was ďI grew up poor but didnít know it until I got older and someone told meĒ. I remember this quote when having a conversation with old friends when we began to discuss what it was like to be a kid in Chicago in the 70ís. We didnít know it was a dangerous place until we grew up and the city was cleaned up.

Urban survival means something different to me than some people I guess. People who grew up in Chicago in the 70ís know how to look all the way down the block onto the next block when you turn the corner, or how to look over your shoulder from time to time. Itís something I do to this day. Itís a habit I guess. The best way to defeat a mugger is to run directly at them. Bet ya didnít know that one. When a mugger makes his move he has a plan. So many steps it will take to get to youÖ..so much time to draw the weaponÖÖÖsteps:time:momentum= a good strike. Run at him and he will be in contact with you WAY too early. He is off balance and his weapon is not in place. Go for the eyes and neck. Go hard and donít stop, then haul butt out of there!

When I got older I became a carpenter. After quite some time I branched out on my own and I would run a foul with gangsters of the local building departments. I needed protection, someone bigger and tuffer than them. I became buddies and worked under the local political heavyweights. A phone call from them and I had my shield. Urban survival skills is how I managed to get what I got and stay above the water line. I never knew I lived in a jungle until I left the jungle and began to travel. I saw many things around the country and in different parts of the world.

I was here in the city for the big clean up. I watched as swarms of TAC cops would swoop down on a building and empty out the thugs. They were never seen again. Prison construction boomed. Gangs of cops ran right past me and my friends to JUMP and the next group of guys and cuffed all of them. I watched them kick the crap out of a few. This was before everyone had cameras on their phones.

The city became clean on the North side and much of the South. People hated the Yuppies but I loved em. It was their money that was the fuel of the biggest building boom in Chicago history and I worked right through it. I made money and made a name for myself as a skilled independent craftsman. People also hated the mayor. I loved him. He clean up my city and it shined all the way up to the crash we are now in.

Marvellous9
09-08-2010, 02:17 PM
I noticed that when I moved out to Dryside (Spokane) a few years back, I felt twitchy and nervous all the time, because I was unused to the open spaces and exposed feeling you get from miles of open fields and nothing to block your view--

I grew up surrounded by thickly wooded hills. A sightline of a mile or more was rare and unusual anywhere besides the highways, and even they often bent and twisted around the contours of the foothills. Consequently, I learned not to watch, but to listen. (My peripheral vision sucks, but I can tell when something's crossing the south pasture two hundred yards off on a windy night.)

Panzer
09-08-2010, 02:23 PM
I am lucky enough to feel comfortable in both settings and have spent lots of time in Chicago, Milwaukee and even NYC. It's mindset that's for sure!

easy
09-08-2010, 02:48 PM
I noticed that when I moved out to Dryside (Spokane) a few years back, I felt twitchy and nervous all the time, because I was unused to the open spaces and exposed feeling you get from miles of open fields and nothing to block your view--

I grew up surrounded by thickly wooded hills. A sightline of a mile or more was rare and unusual anywhere besides the highways, and even they often bent and twisted around the contours of the foothills. Consequently, I learned not to watch, but to listen. (My peripheral vision sucks, but I can tell when something's crossing the south pasture two hundred yards off on a windy night.)
So wild you say that! I also am not used to having a long sightline. I have enjoyed long road trips just for the views.

Old Philosopher
09-08-2010, 08:09 PM
I don't care for an urban setting mainly for one complicated reason: I can feel the tension and agitation of all those around me, just going about their daily dramas. I don't feel unsafe, it's just an oppressive feeling. I have a long, boring story about going back to the Seattle area after 2 years in Montana, but I'll spare you. Suffice it to say there's a different "atmosphere" in the Realm of the Urban Cave Dwellers. ;)

rasp181
09-08-2010, 08:26 PM
I'm a lifelong countryboy but my job takes me into Chicago on occasion. It amazes me how people there go out of their way to avoid interaction with other people. Where I live you make eye contact, wave at or speak to strangers, etc. In Chicago people will step out into the crosswalk without even looking to see if you are going to stop just to avoid eye contact. I am a bit of a loner but even I couldn't live that way.

easy
09-08-2010, 08:42 PM
I'm a lifelong countryboy but my job takes me into Chicago on occasion. It amazes me how people there go out of their way to avoid interaction with other people. Where I live you make eye contact, wave at or speak to strangers, etc. In Chicago people will step out into the crosswalk without even looking to see if you are going to stop just to avoid eye contact. I am a bit of a loner but even I couldn't live that way.
Its not that we will step out into the crosswalk without even looking to see if you are going to stop just to avoid eye contact. Its that we will cross the street any darned place or time we feel like it. One time I was in LA and I crossed the street not at the interection. People looked at me like I was just out of my mind!!!!!! It was my friend later who explained that only in Chicago is Jaywalking a way of life.

Old Philosopher
09-08-2010, 08:50 PM
Its not that we will step out into the crosswalk without even looking to see if you are going to stop just to avoid eye contact. Its that we will cross the street any darned place or time we feel like it. One time I was in LA and I crossed the street not at the interection. People looked at me like I was just out of my mind!!!!!! It was my friend later who explained that only in Chicago is Jaywalking a way of life.
LOL! Well, there may be two different philosophies on jay-walking. Either "any damn place or time we feel like it", or "it's the shortest distance between two places".
People in my town down't actually "jay-walk". They stand on the edge of the road, and people stop for them to cross. This is the ONLY place I've ever been where traffic on a State Highway will voluntarily stop to let someone "jay-walk". :59:

georgel
09-08-2010, 09:40 PM
The best way to defeat a mugger is to run directly at them. Bet ya didnít know that one. When a mugger makes his move he has a plan. So many steps it will take to get to youÖ..so much time to draw the weaponÖÖÖsteps:time:momentum= a good strike. Run at him and he will be in contact with you WAY too early. He is off balance and his weapon is not in place. Go for the eyes and neck. Go hard and donít stop, then haul butt out of there!

This is called resetting the OODA loop. ;)

Phoenix01
09-18-2010, 11:43 PM
Its not that we will step out into the crosswalk without even looking to see if you are going to stop just to avoid eye contact. Its that we will cross the street any darned place or time we feel like it. One time I was in LA and I crossed the street not at the interection. People looked at me like I was just out of my mind!!!!!! It was my friend later who explained that only in Chicago is Jaywalking a way of life.

A pedestiran can get a ticket out here for jaywalking. But once you are in the street, traffic must stop for you or be ticketed also.

EvilPhil
09-19-2010, 01:36 AM
I don't care for an urban setting mainly for one complicated reason: I can feel the tension and agitation of all those around me, just going about their daily dramas. I don't feel unsafe, it's just an oppressive feeling. I have a long, boring story about going back to the Seattle area after 2 years in Montana, but I'll spare you. Suffice it to say there's a different "atmosphere" in the Realm of the Urban Cave Dwellers. ;)

Seattle is all about caffeine, angst and neurosis. It's kind of fun from time to time,
but eventually it gets old.
Eastside over by Bothell, Kirkland, Redmond, and Bellevue seem to be
considerably better. Kind of creepy though, everything is just a little
too new and clean.

Weirdest urban vibe I ever got though, was when driving through Atlanta.
It was a little chilly, about 28-30 degrees or so, I was driving through at
about 2am, and there was just about no traffic. Saw maybe a couple
dozen other vehicles. My mind kept saying, this is Atlanta, where the hell
is everyone ?

In Chicago, Detroit, even Des Moines there's traffic at all hours, enough at
least that you don't have to actively search for other traffic. For some reason
the city just shut down that night. Creepy. :43:

flyindata
09-19-2010, 03:04 AM
Several Month's ago I bought 2 friends to downtown Seattle for sight seeing and so forth. I was amazed how people from Taiwan and really world travelers were perfectly fine with walking around downtown at Night. I walked by a bus stop that during the day had maybe a couple of people, But at night 100+ gang bangers and not sure but I thought the cast of Americas most wanted. I told a friend that used to work security mall across that bus stop about it, and apparently people die regularly there. My Friends lived in Taiwan and Gangsters are normal but for some reason didn't see issues with Gang bangers or the Survival habits they normally used everyday. My Friends actually thought I was mad for some reason, I was in fact using the same survival techniques developed from being in a hostile environment. Every enviroment has different techniques for survival however haven't seen to many urbancraft websites.

ed

Bush Otter
09-19-2010, 06:48 AM
The cops ain't going to round up all the thugs any way or any where , my first rule for a hostile inviorment is to examine why am I here and if there is not a good reason I need to get out of Dodge , sooner or later you will have a situation with no dividenes , as for jay walking a truck will remove you from the equasion sooner or later , attitude can't make you run faster.

Old Philosopher
09-19-2010, 10:40 AM
... Every enviroment has different techniques for survival however haven't seen to many urbancraft websites.

ed
You're right about that. Most "urban survival" discussions involve SHTF scenarios. But the sad truth is, nearly every day in a crowded urban setting is a test of 'survival'. Daily practice of Situational Awareness is essential, or should be. If you're not avoiding parasites and predators, you're dodging traffic on the roads!

... as for jay walking a truck will remove you from the equasion sooner or later , attitude can't make you run faster.
No doubt! That reminds me of the old "joke" about the epitaph on the guy's headstone: "He had the right-of-way". Even crosswalks are only paint on the pavement...they're not brick walls!