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View Full Version : Stove-Coleman vs MSR Pocket Rocket



Seeker
10-04-2010, 07:15 AM
Decision time. I've used an MSR SimmerLite and/or an alcohol stove for years. The Simmerlite is awesome, but bulky. The alcohol stove is very light but I can only use it to boil water (yeah, i know it can bake and simmer with enough fiddling.) Considering a propane stove as a 'can do it both' stove.

The MSR Pocket Rocket comes highly recommended, and MSRP is around $40 as closely as i can tell. I think it weighs 3oz.

Coleman makes something that looks like it for about $30. I've heard that it has some sort of plastic fittings that are somewhat fiddley and may break. Plastic and heat don't mix, in my mind. I think it weighs 2.7oz (perhaps the weight savings is from the plastic.)

I beleive you tend to get what you pay for. $10 is not a huge difference. But $10 is also $10! Can anyone tell me what the practical differences are, based on their own experiences?

cjtf
10-04-2010, 07:30 AM
have a read here....
http://www.coleman.com/coleman/colemancom/detail.asp?product_id=9741AA00C&categoryid=2005&brand=
..click on the review too...

actichy
10-04-2010, 08:05 AM
I haven't used the Coleman stove, but I have a MSR pocket rocket. It works well enough for boiling water for oatmeal, etc. I haven't tried frying anything on it, so I don't know how well that works. The flame control is better than on my Primus camp stove and it's very light and compact, but the pocket rocket has a very small pot support, which makes it kind of unstable.

Malleus
10-04-2010, 08:31 AM
I have a Coleman Exponent 442 & it works real well in all sorts of weather from cooking to water boiling. My only complaint is sometimes I have to bleed & repump between uses.
One fill up of fuel would probably just get you 3 meals.

madmax
10-04-2010, 08:47 AM
I went with the Pocket Rocket based on what I'ld seen being used out there. Although, I don't have any experience with the coleman version (other than fiddlin' with it at the store). Like you, I didn't see alot of differences and I chose the PR because, at the time, it had a longer track record with the people I ran into. I'ld buy it again.

ezra45
10-04-2010, 08:55 AM
In that review posted above, read the last line on the bottom right in the list of attributes...you can do better...

Regards,

ezra

shorthair
10-04-2010, 08:56 AM
I have a couple of Coleman's use them almost on a daily basis, mostly warming coffee and soup type stuff. They work flawlessly. However is did strip the threads on one stove. Sent it in to Coleman and they replaced it no questions. I also have a Jet boil and several other stoves, but the Coleman's are what I take on the train.

NorthernBushcraft
10-04-2010, 12:21 PM
I have the Pocket Rocket and I like it a lot. My only beef with it is that it can be a little unstable at times and you have to keep a pretty close eye on it to make sure your cookware is not sliding off - especially when the flame is on a higher setting. The higher pressure lifts the pot a little.

As far as cooking, no worries there. I have an Outbound cook set and recently made a stir fry in one of the pots using the PR stove. Chicken, peppers, mushrooms, & celery. Cooked the whole mess up in about 12-15 minutes. I use it regularly for boiling water on the trail and whomping up a quick lunch. Boil time on a cup & 3/4 is about 3.5 minutes in a stainless camp cup.

Boreas
10-04-2010, 01:11 PM
Synonyms for Coleman camping products:

1) Slightly cheaper, far crappier
2) Cheap shit
3) Regrettable


That's my opinion, in my experience MSR is a little more expensive, but built better. I've never been completely satisfied with any Coleman product.

Panzer
10-04-2010, 01:34 PM
the pocket rocket is an awesome little stove. I have had one for years. I have a buddy who has had one for almost 10 years. They are hard to beat and MSR is quality. You won't go wrong!

AlpineZone
10-04-2010, 02:38 PM
Have not used the coleman myself but I too have had a pocket rocket for years, and have never had anything go wrong with it. It's such a simple little stove that puts out major flame but can be turned way down for simmering as well.

I'd go with the PR any day of the week and twice on sundays. JMHO

rg598
10-04-2010, 02:57 PM
I say go with the MSR. The Pocket Rocket has been around for a very long time, and has been tested in many conditions. It has proven itself to be a solid stove.

AlteredMentalStatus
10-04-2010, 03:33 PM
pocket rocket....pots like to vibrate of stove, only con I have with it...... I've had mine since they were first put on the market

sarge1967
10-04-2010, 04:01 PM
I have a Pocket Rocket and am very pleased with it. It boils water very fast and that is mainly what I use it for. I have never tried to actually cook something on it. It does turn down quite a bit so I am sure it would work fine if I wanted to simmer with it. At this point it boils water for coffee, Moutain House meals and such.

Spork
10-04-2010, 04:14 PM
When I was shopping for a new stove, the choices came down to the Pocket Rocket and Gigapower. I went with the Snow Peak Gigapower because it had 4 supports instead of three and had an optional windscreen available.

So far I'm very happy with it...but because I'm a stove nut, I may pick up a MSR sometime in the future if I can snag one on sale...

For you guys experiencing pot slippage problems...have you thought of using hi-temp stove paint on the bottoms? I've had some very slick stainless pots that tended to slide around...painting them gave the bottoms some texture for the supports to grip.

Seeker
10-04-2010, 04:52 PM
thanks all, for your replies... i have some thinking to do. thanks again for the input.

MJDavis
10-04-2010, 05:32 PM
I have a Brunton Raptor, have had very good luck with it, so have several friends. Those I know with the MSR stoves like them too. You probably can't go wrong with whatever you choose. They all will boil water in a short time. Good luck with whatever you decide.

Henry-Krinkle
10-04-2010, 06:21 PM
I just bought the msr whisperlite and I love it. I did a lot of research on this stove and 98 % of the reviews were very positive. They are a bit more expensive than the pocket rocket, but you can use a variety of different fuels.
Would you consider buying one of those stoves?
Hk

cloudraker
10-04-2010, 07:48 PM
I have used MSR and coleman stoves for well over 2 decades. The coleman are good weekend/car camping units. For longer harder trips go with MSR. Except for the early Whisplites, they are rugged and have never let me down when I needed them most. The newer whispers are a better design.
My hunting buddy bought a pocket rocket and I must say they are nice little units. When my single burner propane gives up the ghost I'll get one too.

AaronMB
10-04-2010, 08:01 PM
If it comes down to the Coleman versus MSR, go with the MSR PR.
The PR has a narrow, concentrated flame so cooking on it like you do a gas burner at home is challenging but is par for the course for micro stoves.
The Whisper Light [International] has its mutli-fuel advantages but is a different kind of unit altogether so it's almost apples and oranges comparing the two. I have both and each has its applications. It depends on your wants/needs; if I'm just boiling water for coffee, tea, or rehydrating food I'll take the PR and use a GSI Soloist. But if I know I might be cooking up some fresh trout or whatever I'll take the Whisper Light and use a more complete cook-set (of course the latter takes up extra space and adds a bit more weight).

Seeker
10-05-2010, 12:08 AM
I just bought the msr whisperlite and I love it. I did a lot of research on this stove and 98 % of the reviews were very positive. They are a bit more expensive than the pocket rocket, but you can use a variety of different fuels.
Would you consider buying one of those stoves?
Hk

i looked at the whisperlite, and decided on a simmerlite instead... have had it for years... but now i'm looking for something slightly different-hence the Coleman F1 vs MSR Pocket Rocket debate...

AlpineZone
10-05-2010, 12:40 AM
If you want to stay light but sacrifice 4 season usability... the packafeather stove is an alcohol stove that you can cook with, is completely adjustable for simmering/boiling, takes up little room, and the most efficent alcohol stove on the market. ( I once snared a morning dove and seared its breast then cooked it over simmer until done ).

Its downfalls are..

1. Its still an alcohol stove and suffers severly in cold if the meths are cold ( do not rely on it for your go to stove/warmer in the winter months.
2. The packafeather has some smaller parts ( Wire adjuster ) that should be taken care of at all time.
3. Both of its models have ultralight pot stands and can be a PITA.
4. It's expensive

I've used the regular featherweight packafeather model for a long time without any problems besides these normals from an UL weight meth stove. www.packafeather.com

Happy cooking!

Old Philosopher
10-05-2010, 12:49 AM
Okay, I gotta be the odd man out here.
I went sheep hunting with a buddy in Alaska. He was a mountaineer, and had an MSR Whisperlite. I was fascinated with its light weight, and multi-fuel capability.
I lug around an old Coleman 502 single burner (have 2 actually). I also have a Peak I. After cursing the Peak I for a week, I went back to the 502.
When we set up camp, I watched him assemble his stove. He had connected the sig bottle and was adjusting the flame on the MSR about the time my billy of stew was ready to eat. The Coleman 502 holds a pint of fuel, and will last me 3-4 days. Pound for pound, I'll stick with the stability and reliability of my Ol' Faithful. :) It's been in production for over 40 years, and that says something.

Panzer
10-05-2010, 07:21 AM
The whisperlite is a different animal then the pocket rocket. Apples and oranges.The pocket rocket is more like the coleman. It's a single burner and works off a pressurized cartridge. No priming.

Old Philosopher
10-05-2010, 10:06 AM
Coleman apparently has a new model out similar to the 502, but multi-fuel. If I ever change, I'll probably check it out, despite the bulk/weight.
The last thing I'll say about the old 502 is that they are so "crude" and forgiving that I can burn unleaded gasoline, instead of having to search for some "exotic" fuel (Coleman, alcohol, white gas, etc.). All you have to do is hose the jet and carburetor down with carb cleaner every 10-12 uses. I do the same with my Coleman lanterns and big stoves. In a possible future with limited fuel resources, I find that's an attractive feature.

Panzer
10-05-2010, 10:16 AM
I know the multi fuel stoves are handy especially if traveling overseas. Plus 1!

But he was asking about a comparison between two canister stoves. So I think most were sticking to that scenario. There are tons of stoves on the market to try.
Jetboil's are awesome also look at the Bruton Raptor (both of these are canister). The Coleaman Peak series has some highly rated multi fuel stoves. Check out Backpacker.com for reviews.

Old Philosopher
10-05-2010, 10:54 AM
I know the multi fuel stoves are handy especially if traveling overseas. Plus 1!

But he was asking about a comparison between two canister stoves. So I think most were sticking to that scenario. There are tons of stoves on the market to try.
Jetboil's are awesome also look at the Bruton Raptor (both of these are canister). The Coleaman Peak series has some highly rated multi fuel stoves. Check out Backpacker.com for reviews.

As far as this (canister...if I interpret this correctly) type stoves are concerned, I find that I prefer them over the type (e.g., MSR whisperlite) that use a separate fuel container. I don't care for any that require their own special propane bottles, though. I don't like being dependent upon one fuel source that requires a special appliance.
I see the Coleman F1 says it will burn 2 hours on low, and less than an hour on 'high'. The light weight would appear to be off-set by the need to carry extra fuel cans. Compared with a pint fuel reservoir in the liquid fuel canister stoves, which will last 2 days. Just my opinion, though.