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lonewolf5577
10-30-2010, 08:04 PM
How long after killing a deer or other game animal should I wait before eating some?

Would it be safe to eat steaks over the camp fire the day of the kill?

I have searched Google quite a bit and could not find any info....

zenman1678
10-30-2010, 08:06 PM
the fresher the better if you ask me! people have been eating their meat freshly killed for hundreds of thousands of years. some people i know eat the heart raw almost immedietely, though i really don't recomend that.

lonewolf5577
10-30-2010, 08:10 PM
I was told the diarrhea was a possible ailment of eating the meat right away, have you have any problems at all?

rattlesnake_wrangler
10-30-2010, 08:11 PM
I hang mine for 24 hours unless its still bleeding my dad on the other hand hangs his for 72 hours. you can start eating it right after its kinda up to you.

saxon
10-30-2010, 08:11 PM
Sure its safe. Handle wild game like any other food from your kitchen. Even if your camping outside keep things as clean as you can, make sure you cook hot and long enough to kill bacteria, and eat hearty.

MsAwaredays
10-30-2010, 08:11 PM
We always cook up a roast of deer the day we get one. Happy eating!

Scotsmanspride
10-30-2010, 08:15 PM
Same Day and Never had any Problems at all.

GreyOne
10-30-2010, 08:16 PM
The meat is perfectly safe to eat, if it is properly cooked. I have eaten a number of deer and rabbit meals within a couple of hours of the game being killed.
If the meat is skinned and butchered properly, it will be a lot better tasting. Meat is often contaminated by lots of hair from the skin, and this can transfer oils that don't leave a good taste.
Leaving game unskinned and uncleaned for several hours can also adversely affect the taste of the meat.

Diarrhea is purely a factor of contamination _and_ not thoroughly cooking the meat.

mertmcg
10-30-2010, 08:16 PM
their are plenty of ways to process meat. to eat it right after is not a problem just cook it, or smoke it for a while to make jerky, as with all food the thinner you cut it the faster it will cook and the more likely to kill parasites .. your more likely to catch something from the animal if you have cuts on your hands and interact with the animals blood during processing. some prefer to gut it put it in the freezer for around 3 days then skin it they say it adds flavor i can't say for sure plus takes up all of the freezer. usually if around the house i wash it make up salt water in bowl and soak for a day or 2 before i freeze it.

smokewalker
10-30-2010, 08:19 PM
If I'm hungry I have been known to build a fire before field dressing so I can have a steak I alwlys keep a little S&P in my warbag just for those occasions.

akabu
10-30-2010, 09:35 PM
Liver / heart/ roast over the fire yum

BillCr
10-30-2010, 09:48 PM
I ate a squirrel the other day about an hour and a half after killing him. I would have ate him sooner but I had to clean him and start a fire!

OLD DOG
10-30-2010, 09:59 PM
It is perfectly safe to eat venison the same day it is killed, but it will be better if hung in a cool place for 3 days first. It is simply the act of aging meat. Gut the deer ASAP, and skin it as soon as practical. This lets the meat cool out. If you have a cellar, great! Some die hard deer hunters have a special cool room to hang and age their venison. Properly aged meat of any kind is better than fresh killed.

wolfy
10-30-2010, 11:41 PM
I think it's always better after allowing it to hang long enough for the body heat to leave it and rigor mortis sets in. That's usually a period of 24 hours, but the heart, liver and tongue go into the saltwater bath in the fridge right away and are eaten as soon as my wife gets home in the evening. The tongue is usually pressure cooked the next day, peeled, chilled and sliced up into little cracker-sized "coins". A delicacy!

You hear lots of opinions on hanging or aging deer, but the University of Iowa did a study on aging deer by hanging and they say that it makes no difference in tenderization because they don't have any marbling and the enzymes just don't work like they do when aging beef. I think that cutting cold meat for packaging is just much easier after allowing it to thoroughly cool out.

Trekon86
10-30-2010, 11:49 PM
As soon as you like, just be sure to cook it thoroughly, as with any meat. The organs are a prime candidate for immediate cooking (heart and liver especially).

However if you're wanting to butcher and freeze your meet you may want to let it hang a few hours, skin it out, and then butcher, slice, package and freeze.

I agree with Wolfy, it's much easier to slice cold meat than warm. Something about the elasticity vs. gelatinosity.

PMZ

benajah
10-31-2010, 12:02 AM
The idea of hanging the meat to drain has to do with a lot of things, mostly about the taste (some people like the taste better with most of the blood and fluids drained out) and also about easier butchering (the meat gets stiffer and it is easier to make even cuts for steaks, fillets, whatever.)
It has nothing to do with safe eating however. Fresh kill is probably the safest way to eat the meat.

Old Philosopher
10-31-2010, 12:48 AM
If the kill's still warm, you don't have to heat it as long to cook it! :D

Old Philosopher
10-31-2010, 12:58 AM
You hear lots of opinions on hanging or aging deer, but the University of Iowa did a study on aging deer by hanging and they say that it makes no difference in tenderization because they don't have any marbling and the enzymes just don't work like they do when aging beef. I think that cutting cold meat for packaging is just much easier after allowing it to thoroughly cool out.

I agree with Wolfy 100%. "Aging" venison doesn't have the same benefits as aging beef, or especially pork. BUT, proper treatment of wild meat means getting it cooled down as soon as possible!
Most of our hunting season is in below-freezing temperatures. I learned the hard way that letting a deer hang until it's on the verge of freezing is a PITA to butcher. The last thing I want to do is freeze my hands trying to carve stiff meat off the bone.
I have the advantage of being able to get my deer skinned and hung in the garage within an hour, or so, of being shot. I take the head off to let it drain, and get it skinned right away. Even an hour after being killed, the carcass will steam when the hide's removed. If there is no risk of freezing, I'll wait until the next day to get it cut up and in the fridge.
I found that venison will get a tough, dark glaze on it the longer it hangs. It's not very appetizing, and something I try to avoid.

Dink
10-31-2010, 01:14 AM
This may sound odd...but if the weather is cold enough after gutting and cleaning one out, I spread the ribs open and let it hang for a couple days (weather no warmer than 35 degrees during the day) in a large metal shed which cools it down quite a bit more (usually in 20's inside when outside is in 30's). I skin it out during the day and leave it hang until night to make sure the outside is firmed up good. Cut it up and process the meat after dark.

Usually the night of a kill, I will have heart and other organ meats for supper. And the night I do the processing, someone else will take the backstraps (tenderloin) and make up some steaks and fixins for a meal. Its never to soon to eat it. I just like to let it cool good before processing it, since it seems to make the meat MUCH easier to handle and process...and seems to kill some of the gamey taste.

cbo
10-31-2010, 02:44 AM
You can eat it right away, but if you want to freeze it, wait until the rigor mortis has left the body, or it will be tough to chew after you cook it

bigbore442001
10-31-2010, 05:23 AM
How long after killing a deer or other game animal should I wait before eating some?

Would it be safe to eat steaks over the camp fire the day of the kill?

I have searched Google quite a bit and could not find any info....

For us it depends on the weather. As an example I shot a button buck yesterday and the temperature reached a high of 55 F. I had made the decision to butcher it right away.

It should not matter whether or not you eat the meat right away ? I know many times people have eaten the liver right away without ill effects.

MountainSurvival
10-31-2010, 06:03 AM
I have always had the back straps the day of the kill.. As for the rest of the deer it hangs in the yard for a few days depending on the temp..

PeterCartwright
10-31-2010, 06:10 AM
The O.P.er's reference to G.I. problems is curious. I've never heard anyone opine about this before. My uneducated guess is that a person may have G.I. problems because of neglecting their own hygiene (not washing hands properly) after field dressing their game. Field dressing often exposes hands to fecal matter which, if not properly cleansed before eating, offers the opportunity to do the outhouse dance.

PC

Two Rivers
10-31-2010, 06:44 AM
I disagree about the hanging. The enzymes break down muscle fibre and has little to do with fat or the amount of marbling. I've left venison hang as long as a week as long as the temps do not exceed 42 deg. It makes the meat more tender. I also find it easier to remove most of the fat on the outer carcase right after being skinned. (some folks like venison fat. Me, not so much )
As far as your question, you can knaw on it as soon as you like. Meat is meat as long as it isnt rotten. GI problems can come from many thing including being unaccustom to eating whatever it is your trying for the first time.

neomaz
10-31-2010, 08:15 AM
I have had venison just after a fresh kill and butchered and put the meat in a cooler filled with ice for 3 days (No, we emptied the dirty water and ice and added fresh clean ice as needed)...3 day old venison was more tender and alot less gammy tasting..which I found to be true with most animals. (better they are bleed out the less gamy taste they have..least I think so)

But if the venison is free, I am willing to eat it how ever you would like to prepare it. BBQ, Chili, Steaks, Roasted over open fire....as my daughter would say..Meat on a Stick!!!

Seeker
10-31-2010, 08:24 AM
i think it was horace kephart who wrote that eating venison before it has been cooled completely will cause diarhea. that idea seems to have taken on a life of it's own after that. he is/was quite a respected outdoor writer.

Old Philosopher
10-31-2010, 10:11 AM
I think the jury is still out on the "aging" issue. It's true that natural enzymes will break down the muscle fibers, and possibly make the meat more tender. It's also true that freezing will break down the cells in the meat. One one hand, you have chemical breakdown of the cells, and on the other you have mechanical breakdown. Meat which has been subjected to neither (fresh kill) will undoubtedly have a different texture.

At one time, we had four deer hanging at the same time. The first one went in the freezer within 24 hours. The last one was at least four days before it was finished. I never noticed much difference between the meat from any of them.

Pinebaron
10-31-2010, 11:07 AM
I think hanging meat a certain time after the kill has more to do with taste rather than edibility.

Boreas
10-31-2010, 11:22 AM
If I'm hungry I have been known to build a fire before field dressing so I can have a steak I alwlys keep a little S&P in my warbag just for those occasions.

haha, what's your warbag Smokewalker? I like that, think I might use it.

Bax 40
10-31-2010, 05:00 PM
Its been my experience that the sooner you skin and bone out deer and get it on ice the better it tastes.
Most of the deer I have taken were in the hill country of Texas where it may be 30 degrees in the morn and 90 by afternoon.

I usuall fry up some backstrap the day I get one and often cook the liver and heart the same day.



Larry

Old Philosopher
10-31-2010, 05:15 PM
I've been on week long hunts where game was hung in camp. The hide came off immediately, and the carcass wrapped in a game bag. The steaks were on the fire the same night as the kill, though.

jstalljon
11-03-2010, 09:52 AM
Tradition for me is take the inner tenderloins from a deer and cook them the day of the kill. Those are the most tender pieces of meat, and if left inside of a hanging deer, they tend to dry out faster. They taste outstanding that same day on a hot wood fire, with a little salt, pepper, garlic and olive oil.

If the temps are where I can leave the rest of a deer hang for a few days, I let it age. Enzymes break down the connective tissues making for much more tender cuts of meat.

I also know of many guys that quarter their deer and put in coolers with a brine of ice, salt and cider vinegar.....too much work for me. :)

mountain joe
11-03-2010, 10:37 AM
You hear lots of opinions on hanging or aging deer, but the University of Iowa did a study on aging deer by hanging and they say that it makes no difference in tenderization because they don't have any marbling and the enzymes just don't work like they do when aging beef. I think that cutting cold meat for packaging is just much easier after allowing it to thoroughly cool out.

I talked to a commercial wild game meat processor years ago about this question. He had been working with wild game for many years. He said hanging wild game meat for extended lengths of time has no effect on the tenderness. He said sooner the better. The more meat ages the thicker the crust is on the outside of the meat so therefor the more meat that has to be carved off and thrown away or used for trapping or whatever. We always process our meat as soon as we can get around to it. It may be the next day or it may not be for a week and I have never noticed any difference to the tenderness that can be attributed to aging.

You do need to get the meat skinned out, gutted and quartered as soon as possible to have the best quality meat. Especially the bigger game species. It is surprising how long a moose quarter will retain heat if not properly taken care of.

I have a tradition that I have practiced when ever possible. That tradition is to eat some of the meat the day of the kill. Usually it is some backstrap or tenderloin steaks. You can see me and my wife cooking up on my wood cookstove some fresh killed caribou steaks this year in my youtube video below.

YouTube - Caribou Hunt Highlights 2010 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5O47gkHWQuU)

Old Philosopher
11-03-2010, 10:57 AM
I talked to a commercial wild game meat processor years ago about this question. He had been working with wild game for many years. He said hanging wild game meat for extended lengths of time has no effect on the tenderness. He said sooner the better. The more meat ages the thicker the crust is on the outside of the meat so therefor the more meat that has to be carved off and thrown away or used for trapping or whatever. We always process our meat as soon as we can get around to it. It may be the next day or it may not be for a week and I have never noticed any difference to the tenderness that can be attributed to aging.

You do need to get the meat skinned out, gutted and quartered as soon as possible to have the best quality meat. Especially the bigger game species. It is surprising how long a moose quarter will retain heat if not properly taken care of.
I have a tradition that I have practiced when ever possible. That tradition is to eat some of the meat the day of the kill. Usually it is some backstrap or tenderloin steaks. You can see me and my wife cooking up on my wood cookstove some fresh killed caribou steaks this year in my youtube video below.
...
Ditto! Especially the part about waste due to dried out surfaces.

gloomhound
11-03-2010, 11:28 AM
"How long should you let your groceries sit in the trunk of your car before taking it to the refrigerator?" Is another way to look at the question. ;)

Fresher is better in my opinion, such as it is.

Old Philosopher
11-03-2010, 12:03 PM
"How long should you let your groceries sit in the trunk of your car before taking it to the refrigerator?" Is another way to look at the question. ;)

Fresher is better in my opinion, such as it is.
Not very long, if you left the hair on! ROFLAO!

Panzer
11-03-2010, 12:10 PM
I don't understand where this question originally came from. Is this some kind of myth that has been passed around like the plague. The fresher the better!

Old Philosopher
11-03-2010, 12:32 PM
I was told the diarrhea was a possible ailment of eating the meat right away, have you have any problems at all?


I don't understand where this question originally came from. Is this some kind of myth that has been passed around like the plague. The fresher the better!
I've never heard of this either. I think the poster who suggested too much strange food caused gastric distress hit the nail. Someone also suggested other contaminants ingested might have been the problem. Hell, the guy who started that rumor might have been drinking untreated stream water on a hunt. Who knows?

Panzer
11-03-2010, 12:34 PM
It must be PETA's fault! :)

Old Philosopher
11-03-2010, 12:44 PM
It must be PETA's fault! :)

PETA upsets everybody's stomach!