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Roper Pro
11-11-2010, 05:04 PM
Folks, let us not sugar coat this word. I highly encourage everyone from now on quit using this word to describe those that would, will, might, have, or will consider killing anyone for any reason; to use the term "chaos induced thug" or "future possible killer" or "drug induced maniac", anything that describes a true or possible murderer/killer. Just don't use "Zombie".

Giving a "fairy tale nickname" to what might be a true threat creates a lack of prepareness to what might be someone's failure to truly consider the worst of what can happen. No one should, willingly or unwillingly, promote that thought that "It will never happen to me."

Ranger999
11-11-2010, 05:25 PM
Zombie, zombie, zombie......(ducks and runs)...lol

Zig
11-11-2010, 05:27 PM
I dunno about anybody else, but the words zombie and preparation go together for me:
http://ww2.zombieinitiative.org/

:D Just kidding. You're right to a certain extent. Problem is you assume that we aren't just as aware as you are about that fact that it's a nickname. The only difference between us all on this topic is that you don't like the nickname and lots of other people don't mind.

While I urge everyone not to underestimate the power of words, we need to remember a word is only a symbol to bring about an image in our mind. As long as we are talking about the same thing, it doesn't matter very much what we call it.

Rubarb
11-11-2010, 05:28 PM
dunno about anybody else, but im getting fed up with reading about Zombies on a Bushcraft forum.

Just sayin'

daveridesbikes
11-11-2010, 05:42 PM
dunno about anybody else, but im getting fed up with reading about Zombies on a Bushcraft forum.

Just sayin'

i could not agree more. i dont mind conversations on preparedness, and where it intersects with bushcraft. but in my opinion i am starting to see way to many zombie posts.

Skab
11-11-2010, 06:01 PM
I totally agree, there is a Zombie prep forum. If you want to talk about zombies go join it.



Its like someone opened the flood gates here lately and more more posts about them or having to do with them.

Panzer
11-11-2010, 06:28 PM
I agree. There is a forum for that stuff. This aint it.

kgd
11-11-2010, 06:28 PM
The term Zombie appeals to the survival audience (not bushcraft) because it conveys a specific survival scenario that is particularly appealing as a violent fantasy hence the success of the movie genre.

Basically, the commonalities of the zombie scenario are as follows: 1) Human population is severely and suddenly reduced, 2) Anarchy exists and there are no consequences to actions 3) looting is considered a sustainable activity apparently because of the juxtaposition of (1 & 2) above; 4) you can exercise won ton violence on zombies which are considered not-human. In particular, #4 can occur in the absence of remorse or guilt.

In essence, the zombie lore is a couch potato, violence-proned person's wet dream. As per Woodie Harlson's character in zombieland, you get to kill stuff and eat your twinkies too! As a spoof, I think Zombieland captures this essence more than any other film of the genera. Curiously, all of George Romero's films are tragedies where the hero's always succumb in the end. I also find it interesting that elements of the zombie fantasy/cultural icon are retained even when there are no zombies in many movies. In 'The Road' the cannibals are clearly treated as zombies even though they are just humans. However, their decisions and deeds lead the viewer into the perception that they are no longer human. Thus, the Road is essentially a zombie film.

Anyhow, I cannot imagine living in a world of such violent tendencies. I would not want to live in a world where taking another human's life was a 'no-hesitation' matter nor would I ever want to have to be in such a position and feel no remorse for my actions. Maybe I'm just a softy that way. I've killed many more animals than most people have as part of my research and even in that situation I feel some remorse and sense of ethical responsibility for my actions.

Perhaps, in the end that is why I really enjoy bushcraft. Unlike the zombie fantasy, it is really about sustainability. We treat consequences with equal time and respect as resource exploitation.

dwightp
11-11-2010, 06:42 PM
If you can't kill zombies how the heck do you think you can kill zombie threads?

BackwoodsUncleBub
11-11-2010, 06:42 PM
Anyhow, I cannot imagine living in a world of such violent tendencies. I would not want to live in a world where taking another human's life was a 'no-hesitation' matter nor would I ever want to have to be in such a position and feel no remorse for my actions. Maybe I'm just a softy that way. I've killed many more animals than most people have as part of my research and even in that situation I feel some remorse and sense of ethical responsibility for my actions.


Have you been downtown lately? Unfortunately its already like that in some parts of a city. Just catch a few minutes of the evening news. Murders, Rapes, Robberies, Drive by's, etc. Its sad to see how our species is reverting back to such animalistic ways... Having no remorse, no sympathy, no concern for someone else, etc. The very things in my mind that make us human...

leaf and lightning
11-11-2010, 06:46 PM
Have you been downtown lately? Unfortunately its already like that in some parts of a city. Just catch a few minutes of the evening news. Murders, Rapes, Robberies, Drive by's, etc. Its sad to see how our species is reverting back to such animalistic ways... Having no remorse, no sympathy, no concern for someone else, etc. The very things in my mind that make us human...

animals don't treat each other like that...

BackwoodsUncleBub
11-11-2010, 06:51 PM
animals don't treat each other like that...

True, perhaps I should have said sub-human, or non-human...

Perhaps even the Z word??? :-) J/K

MoxemDeliph
11-11-2010, 08:03 PM
For the record, Im kinda tired of the slightly too paranoid survival zombie stuff too.

I just read somewhere around here last night about fellas focusing on the potential threat at the cost of quality living; essentially waiting for the problem rather than living a good life and dealing with a problem when it gets here.

Being prepared is not hypervigilantism.

Now I have to go learn more about knots...:)