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View Full Version : Here is a list of gear that I plan on taking on a "early winter" trip.



sdjsdj
11-22-2010, 09:59 AM
Here is a list of gear that I plan on taking on a "early winter" trip. I expect temperatures between 20-30 degree F. My idea is to have an "open long fire" in front of the US Army Canvas 1/2 Pup Tent which will be lined with a thin mylar survival blanket (to reflect the heat)
Very little extra clothing. I will be wearing heavy winter type clothing(wool sweater, wool pants, M65 shell/liner, polartec long johns). I will change into dry underclothes/socks at night so that I am not sleeping in damp/sweaty clothes. As you can see the total load out will be over 40#, so I will not be doing a lot of traveling. Once the snow flies, I will try to put this on a "pulk" sled.
Anyone have any suggestions?
Weight is in oz in []

Alice Pack Frame [48]
Wool Blanket [80]
foam sleeping pad (closed cell) [10]
15" box saw [19]
small axe (CS Trail Boss) [46]
8" mill file for axe(optional) [6]
Kabar BK-2 knife [16]
candle lantern(w/2 xtra candles)(opt.) [12]
e-tool or snow shovel (optional) [42]
Zebra Pot (w/pot cozy) [11]
Guyot Bottle (optional) [10]
Pocket Cooker twig stove(optional) [20]
Glacier SS cup [4]
2 @ 2qt Canteens w/cover(empty) [10]
REI Ultra Light 18L Pack for day trip(empty) [10]
Canvas Tarp(1/2 USArmy pup tent) [32]
Trauma Blanket ground clothe [12]
Possibles Pouch [32]
headlamp
first aid
survival blanket
firestarter
extra paracord
Leatherman Crunch [6]
Trekking pole [8]
Poncho [12]
Heavy duty leather work gloves [7]
Extra Socks/hat/undergarments [16]
Down Vest [12]
====
Sub Total: [30#]

Food (2.5 days) [64]
oatmeal, raisins, honey
dried apricots
hard candy
tea,coffee,hot choc.
dry milk, salt,cayenne pep
beef jerky
cheese
peanut butter
bannock
rice
beans (red and black)
Ramen noodles
Cliff bars
Water (4 quarts) [128]
====
Sub Total: [12#]
Grand Total: [41#]

Hondo Lane
11-22-2010, 10:02 AM
Maybe some plastic sheeting for a super shelter?

tennecedar
11-22-2010, 10:26 AM
The list looks good. I would double up on the fire starters in case one gets lost. And remember that we need alot of water in us when it's that cold because of the low humidity. Two canteens are a great idea. Just make sure to drink both(2 quarts) each day.

It's getting dark early now. A book and spare batteries for your headlamp might help pass a few hours between sundown and bedtime.

Best of luck on your outing.

sdjsdj
11-22-2010, 10:29 AM
The list looks good. I would double up on the fire starters in case one gets lost. And remember that we need alot of water in us when it's that cold because of the low humidity. Two canteens are a great idea. Just make sure to drink both(2 quarts) each day.

It's getting dark early now. A book and spare batteries for your headlamp might help pass a few hours between sundown and bedtime.

Best of luck on your outing.

Thanks. Yes I always carry reading material with me. I love to read. Currently working my way through Kephart's 2 volume book.(which actuall inspired a good part of my list).

Eagle
11-22-2010, 10:59 AM
Does look like a good list. Could add a bandanna and some toilet paper ( perhaps in your Possibles Pouch [32] ?)
Keep a big wood pile and you should do well; best of luck on your trip.

Bryan Breeden
11-22-2010, 01:26 PM
With that list you are going to do just fine and have a great time I bet.

Bryan

sdjsdj
11-22-2010, 03:30 PM
Does look like a good list. Could add a bandanna and some toilet paper ( perhaps in your Possibles Pouch [32] ?)
Keep a big wood pile and you should do well; best of luck on your trip.
Thanks, yes. TP, bandanna, toothbrush, soap, hand sanitizer, extra matches, sunglasses, "sham-wow" towel are already part of the kit.

tnrick55
11-22-2010, 04:32 PM
those ramen are full of msg thy will eat your brain no joke.msg is bad stuff.

Sgt. Mac
11-22-2010, 04:38 PM
Sounds good Buddy

sdjsdj
11-22-2010, 04:40 PM
those ramen are full of msg thy will eat your brain no joke.msg is bad stuff.
Yes, I try only use "part of the seasoning packet" and make up for it with some cayenne pepper.

Mannlicher
11-27-2010, 04:49 PM
I am not understanding the sub standard old canvas army pup tent shelter half. Some of the other gear is almost as if you are trying to set yourself up for misery.

sdjsdj
11-27-2010, 06:08 PM
I am not understanding the sub standard old canvas army pup tent shelter half. Some of the other gear is almost as if you are trying to set yourself up for misery.

Well, in the past I have mainly used REI style backpacking gear for a 3 season type of set up. And lately I have been reading Kephart's Camping and Woodcraft. The gear in the list is the "least expensive" way I can think of to try a winter set up that replicates his style. The purpose of the canvas tarp is to be able to have a fire "somewhat close" to my shelter. Using my "expensive" BCUSA tarp would be taking to great a risk. I know I could just use a cheap poly tarp, just thought that the $10 for a "real canvas shelter 1/2" would be worth it. Also the idea of using wool blanket instead of an "expensive 4 season sleeping bag" is due to the fire issue. I guess my whole point here is to try the "more primitive" style winter camping without all the expense of the "modern nylon light weight equipment". That entire gear list cost less than $400. I realize this is all very heavy "somewhat" clunky gear, but my idea is to create more of a "car camp/base camp" comfort situation, not piling on the miles.

solocanoe
11-28-2010, 07:47 AM
It all sounds like it would work fine for you. You'll make your adjustments after use I'd guess.

A small flask doesn't weigh a lot. :)

You can tell yourself 151 is a firestarter if you have to. lol!
I like a little celebration around thefire at night. A toast to give thanks for God allowing me to have another day out and about.

dwightp
11-28-2010, 07:54 AM
15" box saw [19]
small axe (CS Trail Boss) [46]
8" mill file for axe(optional) [6]
Kabar BK-2 knife [16]
e-tool or snow shovel (optional) [42]

An axe, a saw, a BK2, AND an e-tool? I think you could save some weight here and leave at least one of these at home.

sdjsdj
11-28-2010, 09:24 AM
15" box saw [19]
small axe (CS Trail Boss) [46]
8" mill file for axe(optional) [6]
Kabar BK-2 knife [16]
e-tool or snow shovel (optional) [42]

An axe, a saw, a BK2, AND an e-tool? I think you could save some weight here and leave at least one of these at home.
You are right. That is a lot of weight in the tools area. I intend on "processing my own firewood" from dead standing wood, so in my opinion and experience, the saw is the most efficient (I have a folding saw, but it takes a lot of energy if the wood is more than 2" in diameter). Splitting the wood will be done with the axe (but depending on the diameter, could certainly be done with the BK2 and when night falls, I tend to use the BK-2. I see many people have accidents with an axe in low-light conditions). The e-tool is just coming along because it is so darn cool. If there is a "lot of snow on the ground", some kind of shovel is really helpful (either the e-tool or small snow shovel). Also part of this scenario, is to use the gear I have accumulated. I hate to see it just gathering dust. I won't be hiking 15 miles a day. This is more of a base camp type situation.

WhiteH20
11-28-2010, 03:52 PM
Well, in the past I have mainly used REI style backpacking gear for a 3 season type of set up. And lately I have been reading Kephart's Camping and Woodcraft. The gear in the list is the "least expensive" way I can think of to try a winter set up that replicates his style. The purpose of the canvas tarp is to be able to have a fire "somewhat close" to my shelter. Using my "expensive" BCUSA tarp would be taking to great a risk. I know I could just use a cheap poly tarp, just thought that the $10 for a "real canvas shelter 1/2" would be worth it. Also the idea of using wool blanket instead of an "expensive 4 season sleeping bag" is due to the fire issue. I guess my whole point here is to try the "more primitive" style winter camping without all the expense of the "modern nylon light weight equipment". That entire gear list cost less than $400. I realize this is all very heavy "somewhat" clunky gear, but my idea is to create more of a "car camp/base camp" comfort situation, not piling on the miles.

I get it now as I was wondering the same. I winter camp a lot up here in MN and I would not think of going out without a winter sleeping bag. One thing I would add is to make sure you eat some high energy food prior to going to bed. I typically take a few small blocks of butter rolled in hot cocoa mix for a quick warm up prior to bedtime or when I get cold. Drink lots of water and enjoy!

sdjsdj
11-28-2010, 03:55 PM
I get it now as I was wondering the same. I winter camp a lot up here in MN and I would not think of going out without a winter sleeping bag. One thing I would add is to make sure you eat some high energy food prior to going to bed. I typically take a few small blocks of butter rolled in hot cocoa mix for a quick warm up prior to bedtime or when I get cold. Drink lots of water and enjoy!

Thanks, I will probably have a Winter sleeping bag as a backup in the car. (which I will be near for my first time)

dwightp
11-28-2010, 04:09 PM
You are right. That is a lot of weight in the tools area. I intend on "processing my own firewood" from dead standing wood, so in my opinion and experience, the saw is the most efficient (I have a folding saw, but it takes a lot of energy if the wood is more than 2" in diameter). Splitting the wood will be done with the axe (but depending on the diameter, could certainly be done with the BK2 and when night falls, I tend to use the BK-2. I see many people have accidents with an axe in low-light conditions). The e-tool is just coming along because it is so darn cool. If there is a "lot of snow on the ground", some kind of shovel is really helpful (either the e-tool or small snow shovel). Also part of this scenario, is to use the gear I have accumulated. I hate to see it just gathering dust. I won't be hiking 15 miles a day. This is more of a base camp type situation.

Yeah, I can see the etool coming in handy if there is lots of snow around. I own a BK2 and have split tons of firewood with it. You can also use it to cut some wood also. I would probably leave the axe at home. Actually, if it were me, I would look for dead wood and just split it with the BK2 and leave the saw at home also, if I were really concerned about the weight. But I would probably take the etool if there was much snow, just in case. Remember, you can also cut wood with it too.

coloradowildman
11-29-2010, 08:00 PM
Yeah, I can see the etool coming in handy if there is lots of snow around. I own a BK2 and have split tons of firewood with it. You can also use it to cut some wood also. I would probably leave the axe at home. Actually, if it were me, I would look for dead wood and just split it with the BK2 and leave the saw at home also, if I were really concerned about the weight. But I would probably take the etool if there was much snow, just in case. Remember, you can also cut wood with it too.

Having been a veteran of many off trail winter expeditions up here in Rocky Mountains, I say take the axe and leave the BK2. Instead take a light weight sheath knife like a Mora or just a good folder or multi-tool along with the axe. Axes rule in the winter, because snow covers up and soaks all the normal small to medium stuff on the ground and it can be impossible to get that stuff lit before you freeze your a### off:) A good axe will fell, buck, split and make kindling from the inner wood of downed dead trees way faster than a saw\knife combo will and with less energy.

Saws are great for certain things and I do carry a Bacho Laplander sometimes. I guess one can survive for a time with a stout knife and a folding saw in cold winter scenarios, but having tried this a few times before in sub-zero weather I can tell you it's no picnic because of the extra work you'll have to do. Sawing through frozen wood takes lots of energy, much more than a good sharp 3/4 axe.

Some excellent axes for these kind of trips are a Wetterlings 26" Scandanavian Forest, 1.87lb head, Council Tool 26" Hudson Bay Axe, 1.75lb (my current user and a great chopper & splitter with a little file touch up, only weighs 43oz), Fiskars 24" Chopping Axe (these split really well because of the wedged shaped head), and the Gransfors Bruks 25" Scandanavian Forest, 2lb head if you can afford it.

I wised up and started carrying a good lightweight axe with a sharp bit and winter treks are now much more fun:)

riley
11-29-2010, 08:05 PM
I really like my Shelter half. Its warm and bullet proof.

coloradowildman
11-29-2010, 08:09 PM
I really like my Shelter half. Its warm and bullet proof.

Riley, I've been thinking of going canvas due to fire safety issues. How much do those surplus half shelters weigh? I carried one when I was in the military but that was over 20 years ago and everything seemed heavy then, but then again, 18-19 year olds don't care much at that age:)

Selash
11-29-2010, 08:42 PM
It looks good to Me. I'm partial to axes Myself... no real reason behind it. Just one of those gut feeling things. But it sounds like you are planning ahead and then some.. not going to far in, having a backup in the car, etc. Be safe, Be prepared, Be humble. Always a good plan.

Gods guiding hand lays over us all.

Selash