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FishBone
11-25-2010, 08:56 PM
Does anyone use them/recommend them? My only problem with sharpening seems to be by angle.. Looking for a reliable system to at least get all my knives sharpened and get used to what I know is for sure the right angle. Figure over time I'll slowly get accustomed to it and hopefully won't need it anymore.

Thanks!
Fish

Kyle64752
11-25-2010, 08:59 PM
I had the same problem as you. I bought the razors edge system and it has a guide that clamps to your blade. It keeps the angle the same each and every time. Their website is: http://www.razoredgesystems.com/

Kyle

saintnick001
11-25-2010, 09:03 PM
I've used the Lansky System for years. It's great. I've sharpened small pocket knives up to full sized combat knives. If I had to do it over again I'd invest and get the diamond stones instead of the regular ones though.

mainewoods
11-25-2010, 09:24 PM
Big Fan of "The Puck"

northstar
11-25-2010, 09:28 PM
I've used the lansky system for years. After the regular stones started to wear down,I got the diamond set. IMO its a great no hassel system. I've sharpened all my kitchen, pocket,and belt knive. It also works on my ontario macheteand my 14 inch old hickory butcher knife. I recommend the holding fixture that screws on to your table top.

Tony

wolfy
11-25-2010, 09:33 PM
Here's a knife sharpener I've read some good things about recently. It takes mini-belts and creates a convex edge. Might be worth considering and doesn't cost much more than the diamond hone equipped Lansky system. I'm thinking about ordering one to see just how well it works. There's a video on the site that bears watching.

http://www.worksharptools.com/

KCD1974
11-25-2010, 09:38 PM
I have the Gatco system, which is similar....I'd also invest in the diamond sharpeners, I went back and upgraded my kit....It is very easy to get good results with either of these systems....There is a great video on you tube..."Sharpening my way" or something like that...LONG but if you sift through it there are some VERY good tips.....

FishBone
11-25-2010, 09:45 PM
Thanks for all the input.. I'm probably going to invest in a system or put it on the Xmas list...

Wish I could do it freehand but I think i'm going to need much, much more practice.. Sharpening has been one of the most frustrating skills for me to learn.. I'm the kind of person the usually "gets it" with most things before long and can hone my skills pretty quickly.. But sharpening has been elusive and frustrating.. Just ready to get all my damn knives sharp.. LOL..

EnglishManInOntario
11-25-2010, 09:51 PM
I have the lansky and i'm not that impressed TBH. I've heard very good things about the spyderco sharpmaker, but not used it myself.

RDROgers
11-25-2010, 10:33 PM
I like the Spyderco Sharpmaker. I also like the Lansky croc sticks. Both have worked well for me at one point or another. Those systems with the clamps have never worked for me. Lately, though, its been sand paper and leather strops.

Phaedrus
11-26-2010, 05:42 AM
I think the Gatco system is a little better than the Lansky. They're both a pain on larger knives where you have to move the clamp repeatedly. They also are limited in how low an angle they can use; probably not a big deal with outdoor knives but a near deal breaker for kitchen knives (the main focus of my sharpening).

MJDavis
11-26-2010, 06:51 AM
I have used the lansky for over 10 years. Works great.
Once you get a knifes edge reprofiled, it only takes a little to touch it up.
For convex I just use sandpaper over a mouse pad.

rimfire63
11-26-2010, 09:02 AM
I ordered a Lansky a few months ago. It does sharpen very effectively. To be honest though, I wish I had read more about sharpening techniques here at BCUSA and over on bladeforums.com before spending the $. I dont regret buying it though as it does a very good job with a little patience. The best price I found was at amazon.com. Good luck with your sharpening. RZ

FishBone
11-26-2010, 09:05 AM
I ordered a Lansky a few months ago. It does sharpen very effectively. To be honest though, I wish I had read more about sharpening techniques here at BCUSA and over on bladeforums.com before spending the $. I dont regret buying it though as it does a very good job with a little patience. The best price I found was at amazon.com. Good luck with your sharpening. RZ

Yeah, I agree, but even with all the information here I just can't seem to get it.. I've bought several stone, finally found a good japanese waterstone that set me back 40 bucks.. Just can't seem to get anything sharp.. Wish I could just get it.. I'll keep practicing the free hand.. The mousepad, sandpaper technique is cool but I don't have anything convex which means I'd have to reprofile all the knives and I'm not confident enough to do that yet.

Shorty
11-26-2010, 09:21 AM
I find that the Lansky is a great travel kit and sharpener between primary sharpening (which I define as full bench stones)...I will usually do teh full bench stones every 3rd heavy use or so and use the Lansky to tidy up in between. I have the diamond stones, which are great except that they leave such bad scratches on the blade...

PMSteve
11-26-2010, 09:33 AM
As others have said, I too prefer the Spyderco Sharpmaker. I've owned the Lansky system and one similar made by Gatco. They do the job but for me, too gimmicky. After sharpening knives for years, I've found that using a DMT Medium/Fine double diamond hone to be the easiest and fastest, followed by a quick strop on a piece of leather or a couple swipes on a crock stick.

The first thing I tell someone who is new to sharpening knives is to tread lightly. Not much pressure is necessary to touch up a good edge. If you have a damaged edge, lightly but often until you've achieved the desired results.

Hint: for a field-expedient strop, I use the heavy welt on the back edge of a leather sheath. I rough it (the leather) up with a bit of fine sandpaper and it's good to go

bb07
11-26-2010, 09:37 AM
My advice would be to keep doing what you are-practicing freehand.Eventually you'll get it.No one was born being able to do it-patience,practice & time will pay off.You'll have an increased sense of self confidence when you're able to freehand sharpen,knowing that you don't need any gadgets to be able to get a good edge.
Not having to pack around all that stuff if you're away from home for an extended time is nice.
Systems like the Lansky do put on a very sharp edge.I had one in the 80's but decided to stop using it in favor of freehand sharpening,simply because I didn't want to become dependent on a set-up like that,and nor was it practical to take in the bush when gone from home for long periods of time.
I'm not criticizing any ones choice of sharpener.They should use whatever works for them,everyone is different.
But in my opinion,being able to freehand sharpen is a very valuable skill.
Just remember,you must maintain the same angle over & over.The actual angle is not as important as a consistent angle.Try to pretend that you're slicing the top off the stone.
Also you might be trying too hard.Try to relax & not get frustrated.Give it time,have patience and keep at it when you're able to work on it without feeling pressured up.Sometimes if it's not going well,walk away for awhile.Give it a rest and go back at it later.You can do it!

Valcas1
11-26-2010, 09:41 AM
I have used the Lansky system for years and have got very good results. It may not be the fastest, or the best but it will give you very, very good results with minimal aggrevation. It just works. I think it shines on smaller blades under 6" IMO.

If you were to purchase the system, I don't think you will be disappointed. Diamond hones are worth the money. They will last your lifetime if used correctly.

Paul

OddTheViking
11-26-2010, 04:39 PM
I've used them for ages. They are great for getting the right profile on the edge, then once it's in place, it's easy to keep them maintained on a regular stone. My most recent incarnation in lot Lanksy brand, but I got it at Cabelas for about $30.

Cracker
11-27-2010, 06:58 AM
I have had good luck with the Lansky Turnbox setup, comes with med and fine sticks and I bought the course diamond sticks. It is compact, light and stays in my pack.

Guardian
11-27-2010, 04:37 PM
I've recently gotten a set and I have to admit since I'm a rock on certain things. It's the easiest system to use IMO.

FishBone
11-27-2010, 05:08 PM
I've recently gotten a set and I have to admit since I'm a rock on certain things. It's the easiest system to use IMO.

Kinda what I'm looking for in the interim.. Like I said, I am an avid DIY'er.. With anything.. Just that the dullness of my knives aren't staying up with the slow learning.,.. Just want something to get the edges on, fool proof, then kinda learn by keeping them sharp.. Then move backwards.. Right now everything is dull and I'm just struggling with it.. And I'm confident thats it consistency with the angle that I am lacking..

Mountain Ron
11-27-2010, 07:29 PM
I've had and used the Lansky delux turn box for years and it sharpens all my stuff easily. Its the only thing besides diamond that will put an edge on my S30V steel. Well worth getting.

JxMAN25
11-27-2010, 08:14 PM
i like the lanskey because you get the same angle on both sides and it stays consistant

Jon Foster
11-27-2010, 08:38 PM
I've got a Lansky system a friend bought for me a few years ago. It works ok but I seem to do a good enough job sharpening things by hand.

Jon.

Geoffrey
11-27-2010, 09:28 PM
Before moving totally to convex edges I heavily used a lansky system. I had both the stones and diamond hones.

My advice is if you want to go this route get the diamond hones, my stones developed very nasty hollow in the center of the hone. The diamonds worked great, to a point.

The diamonds, in my opinion did not get fine enough, I added a lanksy ceramic ultra fine hone to complete the kit.

It is a good kit.

Best of luck.

leaf and lightning
11-27-2010, 09:43 PM
don't know about the Lansky system... but I have been using a Smiths Precision Knife Sharpening System for a while... works good for me...

IdahoBackwoods
11-27-2010, 11:12 PM
I guess it's up to me to plug the EdgePro system. It's like a Lansky raised to professional level. Here's the link:

http://www.edgeproinc.com/

This system controls the angle by means of a BIG triangle for more precision. The stones are of excellent quality.

There is a skill involved in operation: you have to be able to move the stone back and forth with one hand while holding the knife steady against the table stop with the other hand.

The system comes with an excellent DVD tutorial, and Ben will answer questions on the phone. He's willing to give lots of help if you need it.

I've use the EdgePro on S30V and other hard knives, and it does a great job sharpening them. I may use a Spyderco Sharpmaker for a quick touch-up sometimes, but I use the EdgePro to establish bevels and for resharpening too.

FishBone
11-28-2010, 09:39 AM
I guess it's up to me to plug the EdgePro system. It's like a Lansky raised to professional level. Here's the link:

http://www.edgeproinc.com/

This system controls the angle by means of a BIG triangle for more precision. The stones are of excellent quality.

There is a skill involved in operation: you have to be able to move the stone back and forth with one hand while holding the knife steady against the table stop with the other hand.

The system comes with an excellent DVD tutorial, and Ben will answer questions on the phone. He's willing to give lots of help if you need it.

I've use the EdgePro on S30V and other hard knives, and it does a great job sharpening them. I may use a Spyderco Sharpmaker for a quick touch-up sometimes, but I use the EdgePro to establish bevels and for resharpening too.

I'll check out the link and consider.. Again, this is more of a "get me through" solution for the time being. So, I don't want to drop a considerable amount of money on it.. I don't want to rely on any system forever..

WhiteH20
11-28-2010, 03:54 PM
Does anyone use them/recommend them? My only problem with sharpening seems to be by angle.. Looking for a reliable system to at least get all my knives sharpened and get used to what I know is for sure the right angle. Figure over time I'll slowly get accustomed to it and hopefully won't need it anymore.

Thanks!
Fish

I am not smart enough to figure the damn thing out. I use sandpaper and a leather strop. Much easier!

fhm615
11-28-2010, 04:03 PM
Edge Pro Apex is my next purchase and will most likely be the last jig type sharpener I ever need from what I hear and read. My Gatco has served me well over the years bringing dozens of knives of all different steel grades to hair popping sharp, but it's time to move up, and after months of research online Edge Pro Apex is my choice. I still love my Arkansas Stones however and use them often. But for that factory look edge nothing beats a jig for me. :50:

IdahoBackwoods
11-28-2010, 04:21 PM
I'll check out the link and consider.. Again, this is more of a "get me through" solution for the time being. So, I don't want to drop a considerable amount of money on it.. I don't want to rely on any system forever..

Whatever you do, understand this: the main reason beginners can't get a knife really sharp is that THEY DON'T HOLD A CONSTANT ANGLE.

The simplest way for me to hold a constant angle that is the same as when I last sharpened a given knife is to use two sharpening rods that are in a crockstick. The Spyderco Sharpmaker is an example of a crockstick sharpener. AG Russell sells some crocksticks. Some of the ones I use are ones I made, using rods I bought somewhere. (That lets me have rods that are nearly a foot long.)

But even the crockstick doesn't work for everyone, because it assumes that you can hold your knife perfectly and repeatedly vertical while drawing it down the abrasive rods in the crockstick. My wife is usable to do this, no matter how hard she tries.

Beginners are often surprised by how much the sharpness suffers when the angle varies even a tiny bit during sharpening.

If you concentrate on one method and work hard on keeping your angle constant, you will probably get the hang of it eventually, but most people find that it takes quite a while. Once you get that method down, you can go on to another method, and so on. Eventually, you can learn to sharpen a knife with almost anything that is handy.

Be patient and keep at it. I know what you're going through; it took me years to learn to do it!