PDA

View Full Version : Out of The Wild: Venezuela - Gear Selection thread



Joe Willson
02-20-2011, 02:54 PM
OK. This is the list of equipment that was available to the "contestants". You are responsible for selecting gear for 9 people from this list. List what gear you would choose to take and justify each piece. If you can, also explain why you choose to leave something behind.


•2 small metal framed military backpacks
•7 Pemon packs
•4 bows with real barbed 1 and 2 point arrows
•1 flint stone rock
•1 spool of bailing wire
•1 yucca strainer
•1 big fish trap
•10 fish hooks
•9 GPS Beacon transmitters
•1 small dutch oven-style metal pan
•1 big dutch oven-style metal pan
•1 skillet
•1 spool of 1/2" twine approx. 50' in length
•2 broad blade hunting knives with leather belt sheaths
•1 Pemon big drop basket
•4 small gourds
•1 large gourd with cork
•3 machetes (small Pemon-style)
•3 Pemon baskets
•1 big flashlight and 4 extra batteries
•9 mosquito nets
•2 candles
•9 whistles
•1 magnifying glass
•1 axe with handle
•1 axe without handle
•1 hatchet
•2 military belt-mount canteens
•7 round shoulder slung canteens
•9 pairs rubber boots
•9 hammocks
•1 roll of 1/8" parachute cord-style twine
•4 pairs of leather gloves
•1 oversized metal cooking pot/wash basin
•2 maps per leg
•300 electrolyte tabs
•3 tall baby food jars
•2 boxes of tampons
•1 compass
•1 lb of Pemon ground grain
•1 Block of local back salt beef
•5 military fleece blankets
•1 spool of spare slingshot cord
•1 palm hook knife with no handle
•1 roll of screen mosquito net
•1 file for sharpening
•1 small roll of duct tape

VtBlackDog
02-20-2011, 04:42 PM
Wow, thats a lot of stuff.....I don't think Lewis and Clark had that much gear!

wildernut
02-20-2011, 05:00 PM
We are taking it all because "you never know" and besides split 9 ways it isn't all that much weight.

But someone else is carrying the dutch ovens :14:

I'll carry the tampons. They will be worth there weight in gold as barter in 28 days or less :4:.

GreyOne
02-20-2011, 05:09 PM
From the looks of the list- 9 assorted packs, 9 various canteens, 9 pair of boots, 9 hammocks, etc. it was pretty much designed for all of it to be carried by 9 people. As the group loses members, some gear might have to be left. I would be more interested in selecting what gear you as an individual would choose to take, including at least some of the "communal gear" , given a free choice of the whole lot.

Tireur
02-20-2011, 06:18 PM
I'd do what the group actually did, lighten the packaging as much as possible and take it all (i.e. taking all the rope & wire off their spools).
They mentioned that when divided up it gave everybody an average of 50lbs/pack. That's not much to carry 10 miles in three days :D

mario
02-20-2011, 10:35 PM
Navigation/safety:

•1 compass
•2 maps per leg
•9 whistles
•1 magnifying glass
•9 GPS Beacon transmitters (Mandated by the show IIRC)
•300 electrolyte tabs


Packing

•7 Pemon packs
•5 military fleece blankets (2 can be used as packs with a tumpline)


Food gathering

•4 bows with real barbed 1 and 2 point arrows
•10 fish hooks


Shelter

•1 spool of bailing wire
•1 spool of 1/2" twine approx. 50' in length
•9 mosquito nets
•9 hammocks
•1 roll of 1/8" parachute cord-style twine
•1 roll of screen mosquito net


Tools

•2 broad blade hunting knives with leather belt sheaths
•3 machetes (small Pemon-style)
•1 palm hook knife with no handle
•1 axe without handle (handles can be made if needed)
•1 file for sharpening


Food/water/fire

•1 flint stone rock
•1 oversized metal cooking pot/wash basin
•2 military belt-mount canteens
•7 round shoulder slung canteens
•1 lb of Pemon ground grain
•1 Block of local back salt beef



If we don't take it, someone will be crabby...:D

•2 boxes of tampons





Mario

dwightp
02-20-2011, 10:53 PM
I'd do what the group actually did, lighten the packaging as much as possible and take it all (i.e. taking all the rope & wire off their spools).
They mentioned that when divided up it gave everybody an average of 50lbs/pack. That's not much to carry 10 miles in three days :D

I agree. Why would you leave anything behind? That's not that much considering you are dividing it among nine people. Also, there isn't anything that is completely useless in that list. I figure that 3 or 4 folks will be gone after 10-12 days or so. Then you can work on the gear and whittle it down some more.

vermillion8604
02-20-2011, 10:54 PM
heres my gear selections
1 small metal framed military backpack....need something to carry everything in and usually things can be hung from the outside of the pack....no need for a large and bulky pack

1 bow with real barbed 1 and 2 point arrows....for obvious reasons such as hunting
10 fish hooks
1 flint stone rock
1 spool of 1/2" twine approx. 50' in length
1 small dutch oven-style metal pan
1 spool of 1/2" twine approx. 50' in length
2 hunting knifves
2 machetes, 1 as a backup because they didnt look too big to boot
1 mosquito net
2 candles
2 military belt-mount canteens
1 compass
2 boxes of tampons
1 hammock
1 roll of 1/8" parachute cord-style twine
1 pair of leather gloves
1 file
2 maps
100 electrolyte tabs
1 Block of local back salt beef

this is what i would take for myself... would weigh less than 50 lbs i think

mario
02-20-2011, 11:28 PM
I agree. Why would you leave anything behind? That's not that much considering you are dividing it among nine people.

My philosophy boiled down to one sentence by Jack Mountain Bushcraft:

"The more you carry in your head, the less you carry on your back."


I'd leave it behind because there's no reason to carry it.

Fish trap? I can make one (actually several)
Gourds? Already have canteens.
Rubber boots? Feet are going to be wet no matter what and cramming them in rubber boots will help cause foot rot. No thanks.
Baby food jars? What are you carrying in them?
Duct tape? What use does it have in a jungle without tarps, etc?


Not to mention that there are few people who can travel for any length of time with 50 pounds on their back (especially using pack methods they aren't used to).



Also, there isn't anything that is completely useless in that list.

They all have A use. But since I'd be carrying them, they would have to be either 1. Items I couldn't readily make or 2. items with multiple uses.



Mario

One Legged Josh
02-20-2011, 11:37 PM
Navigation/safety:

•1 compass
•2 maps per leg
•9 whistles
•1 magnifying glass
•9 GPS Beacon transmitters (Mandated by the show IIRC)
•300 electrolyte tabs


Packing

•7 Pemon packs
•5 military fleece blankets (2 can be used as packs with a tumpline)


Food gathering

•4 bows with real barbed 1 and 2 point arrows
•10 fish hooks


Shelter

•1 spool of bailing wire
•1 spool of 1/2" twine approx. 50' in length
•9 mosquito nets
•9 hammocks
•1 roll of 1/8" parachute cord-style twine
•1 roll of screen mosquito net


Tools

•2 broad blade hunting knives with leather belt sheaths
•3 machetes (small Pemon-style)
•1 palm hook knife with no handle
•1 axe without handle (handles can be made if needed)
•1 file for sharpening


Food/water/fire

•1 flint stone rock
•1 oversized metal cooking pot/wash basin
•2 military belt-mount canteens
•7 round shoulder slung canteens
•1 lb of Pemon ground grain
•1 Block of local back salt beef



If we don't take it, someone will be crabby...:D

•2 boxes of tampons





Mario

My list was exactly the same! You saved me some typing...:35::35:

Tireur
02-21-2011, 01:58 AM
Duct tape? What use does it have in a jungle without tarps, etc?



Well they've already used it as a bandage, twice :D

pureoceanbreeze
02-21-2011, 02:17 AM
Hey peeps. Rob Lacombe here. Yeah I'm gay. Who cares? In terms of supplies... it was insanity evaluating what to bring and that's why it took us so long packing that crap up. Just thinking about that pack makes my shoulders burn. Anyway, we had no idea where we were, where we were going, what we were going to need or even what the temperatures were going to be. So we just shot in the dark and said, "Meh. This stuff looks important. Let's pack it." Trust me. It was absolute insanity. I swear they were trying to kill us so we weren't fully coherent all of the time. Haha. But it was a great experience... except I learned I snore and smell bad without showering for a while. Lol.

petrifiedwood
02-21-2011, 03:01 AM
I can't imagine only having a single file to maintain cutting edges out there.

VenezuelaMichael
02-21-2011, 03:53 PM
You do snore Rob. :)

MK-9
02-21-2011, 05:25 PM
I wasn't expecting it to hold my interest quite as much as the first two seasons in Alaska. But, so far so good. Unlike last season there isn't anyone right off the bat that I can point out will bail. Last season it was pretty obvious ol' Fred wasn't going to hack it. While I'm sure there will be folks that pack it in, it'd be great for once to see all 9 make it through the whole trip. I'm a pretty determined guy, but I don't know for sure I could get through it. Hunger, pain, heat. I can handle. The cold I can probably get past but, lack of sleep is probably what would beat me down.

My respect to any of those that try.

Joe Willson
02-21-2011, 05:31 PM
One Legged Josh and Mario,
You both left the 2 military frame packs behind. Any reason? Just curious.

Joe Willson
02-21-2011, 05:51 PM
Thanks Rob. Without giving too much away, did you make it out alive? :-)

sprucepine
02-21-2011, 06:01 PM
Our new Venezuelabrad and Oceanbreeze members will be able to let us know what was true, fake and exaggerated after each episode.:dblthumb:
I also noticed that the Maineiac was bare foot up until they started climbing down the mountain.

sprucepine
02-21-2011, 06:08 PM
I'll carry the tampons. They will be worth there weight in gold as barter in 28 days or less :4:.

I almost fell off my chair laughing!:4:

VenezuelaMichael
02-21-2011, 10:47 PM
I made the decision to wear my sandals going down that cursed incline because I wanted to avoid an injury that would have taken me out of the game. The snake boots were required when we were in high risk snake areas. As much as possible I went barefoot. :)

mario
02-21-2011, 10:52 PM
Well they've already used it as a bandage, twice :D

Yeah, well. What can I say? :D

20 years in the food and beverage/hospitality business has taught me to avoid cutting myself...



One Legged Josh and Mario,
You both left the 2 military frame packs behind. Any reason? Just curious.

Personally, that style pack KILLS my back (I have broken vertebrae, etc). Not to mention, those old ALICE packs weigh quite a bit in and of themselves.

I am much more comfortable using a tumpline.

Mario

CanisKil
02-21-2011, 11:26 PM
Ok, here's my list to outfit 9 people:

•2 small metal framed military backpacks
•7 Pemon packs
•4 bows with real barbed 1 and 2 point arrows
•1 flint stone rock
•1 spool of bailing wire...remove spool
•10 fish hooks
•9 GPS Beacon transmitters
•1 spool of 1/2" twine approx. 50' in length...remove spool
•2 broad blade hunting knives with leather belt sheaths
•1 large gourd with cork
•3 machetes (small Pemon-style)
•3 Pemon baskets
•1 big flashlight and 4 extra batteries
•9 mosquito nets
•2 candles
•9 whistles
•1 magnifying glass
•2 military belt-mount canteens
•7 round shoulder slung canteens
•9 hammocks
•1 roll of 1/8" parachute cord-style twine
•4 pairs of leather gloves
•1 oversized metal cooking pot/wash basin
•2 maps per leg
•300 electrolyte tabs
•2 boxes of tampons
•1 compass
•1 lb of Pemon ground grain
•1 Block of local back salt beef
•5 military fleece blankets
•1 spool of spare slingshot cord...remove spool
•1 palm hook knife with no handle
•1 file for sharpening
•1 small roll of duct tape

Left behinds:

•1 yucca strainer...mosquito nets can do the same job
•1 big fish trap...can make one or use mosquito nets
•1 small dutch oven-style metal pan...see 1 oversized metal cooking pot/wash basin
•1 big dutch oven-style metal pan...see 1 oversized metal cooking pot/wash basin
•1 skillet...see 1 oversized metal cooking pot/wash basin
•1 Pemon big drop basket...already have rucks and packs
•4 small gourds...have canteens
•1 axe with handle...see 3 machetes (small Pemon-style)
•1 axe without handle...see 3 machetes (small Pemon-style)
•1 hatchet...see 3 machetes (small Pemon-style)
•9 pairs rubber boots...feet are going to get wet from either sweat or water anyway
•3 tall baby food jars...guess I'm an idiot, don't see a reason for them
•1 roll of screen mosquito net...see 9 mosquito nets

VenezuelaMichael
02-22-2011, 08:55 AM
Left behinds:

•1 yucca strainer...mosquito nets can do the same job
•1 big fish trap...can make one or use mosquito nets
•1 small dutch oven-style metal pan...see 1 oversized metal cooking pot/wash basin
•1 big dutch oven-style metal pan...see 1 oversized metal cooking pot/wash basin
•1 skillet...see 1 oversized metal cooking pot/wash basin
•1 Pemon big drop basket...already have rucks and packs
•4 small gourds...have canteens
•1 axe with handle...see 3 machetes (small Pemon-style)
•1 axe without handle...see 3 machetes (small Pemon-style)
•1 hatchet...see 3 machetes (small Pemon-style)
•9 pairs rubber boots...feet are going to get wet from either sweat or water anyway
•3 tall baby food jars...guess I'm an idiot, don't see a reason for them
•1 roll of screen mosquito net...see 9 mosquito nets

I like your choices; they are sound. I completely agree about not wearing those bloody damn boots. However we were not given a choice on the boots. They forced us to lug them and wear them, due to the snakes.

We took the Yucca strainer for two reasons. We had been told we might run across Yucca at some point; and two types out of the three are toxic and must be processed. We also used the Yucca strainer for carrying Bows/arrows.

I thought it was a Yucca strainer; but no one else pondered it much; and I wasn't sure. Both myself and Brad advocated for leaving the heavy Axe behind; and I suggested we leave the heavy pot; but was voted down.

We ended up lugging most of the crap out of there and down the mountain like a bunch of fools. I think in the next episode you'll see us adjust this line of thinking a tad due to necessity.

It is amazing how easy it is to look over a list like this; while sitting alone and decide what is worth taking or leaving (I've done it myself a bunch of times). In a group situation; with limited time; and a good dose of chaos; it becomes difficult to make good informed decisions. Everyone seems to have different reasoning as to why something should be carried or not.

Pretty sure I chuckled at the chaos the Alaskan crew went though; and found it ironic, when suddenly, I was in nearly the same situation.

My take on the window screening; was that it was fairly light; and might prove useful for making some sort of trap down the line.

But as far as leaving the jars, and heavy stuff. Smart move. One we could have benefited from; if we had been able to agree upon ANYTHING at the beginning. :)

CanisKil
02-22-2011, 09:18 AM
I like your choices; they are sound. I completely agree about not wearing those bloody damn boots. However we were not given a choice on the boots. They forced us to lug them and wear them, due to the snakes.

We took the Yucca strainer for two reasons. We had been told we might run across Yucca at some point; and two types out of the three are toxic and must be processed. We also used the Yucca strainer for carrying Bows/arrows.

I thought it was a Yucca strainer; but no one else pondered it much; and I wasn't sure. Both myself and Brad advocated for leaving the heavy Axe behind; and I suggested we leave the heavy pot; but was voted down.

We ended up lugging most of the crap out of there and down the mountain like a bunch of fools. I think in the next episode you'll see us adjust this line of thinking a tad due to necessity.

It is amazing how easy it is to look over a list like this; while sitting alone and decide what is worth taking or leaving (I've done it myself a bunch of times). In a group situation; with limited time; and a good dose of chaos; it becomes difficult to make good informed decisions. Everyone seems to have different reasoning as to why something should be carried or not.

Pretty sure I chuckled at the chaos the Alaskan crew went though; and found it ironic, when suddenly, I was in nearly the same situation.

My take on the window screening; was that it was fairly light; and might prove useful for making some sort of trap down the line.

But as far as leaving the jars, and heavy stuff. Smart move. One we could have benefited from; if we had been able to agree upon ANYTHING at the beginning. :)

I understand your thoughts on that. However, as an example, what reasoning did anyone have for keeping the baby food jars?

Another thing is that most of us here have a lot of experience doing survival/bushcraft/woodlore. We aren't just armchair warriors, so to speak. Most in your group (at least on TV and the 1st episode) do not. Chaos is a killer and some of the redundant items ie. 2 dutch ovens only have primarily one function. The large cooking pot serves the same function as those and the skillet(I almost kept that).

The rubber boots had to have sucked to be made to carry for safety reasons. I was taught to watch where I sepped in snake country. But I understand that you had to keep them.

The axe. Hard to cut a trail through the bush with an axe. In the jungle the machete can do that and cut down and process any wood you may need. I don't think you will be cutting down mature trees in the jungle.

The window screening could be used as a seine, but the mosquito nets can do that (albeit on a smaller scale) as well.

Thanks for the input. Can't wait til Thursday!

VenezuelaMichael
02-22-2011, 10:30 AM
I understand your thoughts on that. However, as an example, what reasoning did anyone have for keeping the baby food jars?

Another thing is that most of us here have a lot of experience doing survival/bushcraft/woodlore. We aren't just armchair warriors, so to speak. Most in your group (at least on TV and the 1st episode) do not.


I didn't mean to imply you guys don't know what you are doing. I can tell the group on here is quite knowledgeable and I have enjoyed all the insights. I'd say about half of our group had limited knowledge concerning survival. I know Brad, and myself both have survival training and experience. Sam, Nick, and Tara had all hunted/Fished and that sort of stuff.

So the skill set was pretty broad; although the group as a whole certainly did not possess the experience I suspect a number of you have on here. And everyone was intent upon voicing an opinion. The baby food jars, there really wasn't a good reason for taking them. They had some tiny hooks and assorted stuff in them, it was one of those over sights, one of those decisions that we would have fought over for hours before getting everyone to agree upon it. It took less energy to hump the damn things; then it would have taken to argue about not taking them. If that makes any sense.

I think you will find this group had a good deal more knowledge and training then did the group in Alaska. In part the individuals in this group were selected because the producers knew how difficult it was going to be; and tried to pick people that thought might have a chance of making it out.


We were not idiots. We just somethings acted like one :(

CanisKil
02-22-2011, 11:00 AM
Sorry, didn't take it that way. :)

After the first episode I was left with the feeling of too many cooks.

As the saying goes; the more you know the less you need.

Didn't mean to imply you guys were idiots, inexperienced yes...dumb, no.

Didn't you all talk about your "outdoor" backgrounds before you were dropped off? At least to see who knew what.

I'm not gonna knitpick anymore, gonna enjoy the show and talking with you guys. Kudos to all of you!

VenezuelaMichael
02-22-2011, 01:18 PM
After the first episode I was left with the feeling of too many cooks.



:) To true. That was one of our major problems. Too often more than one person would have the right solution to a problem. Trouble was; the solutions rarely were the same.

Then you are left debating the merits of one thing vs. another. So actually we acted the parts of fools quite well, a lot of the time. We do have some moments of redemption (I hope). Sprinkled with a number of boneheaded moves. Should make for entertaining viewing.

And it's all good. I have enjoy reading both the criticism and the kudos. I can tell you this about the people in that group.

Each and everyone of them, (and I am not including myself ;)), are good people. And in spite of the disagreements and mistakes. Everyone there was trying to get the group to the finish line.

And after a few days without food and little sleep. Humans tend to get cranky. So what you see on T.V. might not always be their best moments. If you know what I mean.

Michael

joe305
02-22-2011, 02:23 PM
Ok, here's my list to outfit 9 people:

Left behinds:

•1 yucca strainer...mosquito nets can do the same job
•1 big fish trap...can make one or use mosquito nets
•1 small dutch oven-style metal pan...see 1 oversized metal cooking pot/wash basin
•1 big dutch oven-style metal pan...see 1 oversized metal cooking pot/wash basin
•1 skillet...see 1 oversized metal cooking pot/wash basin
•1 Pemon big drop basket...already have rucks and packs
•4 small gourds...have canteens
•1 axe with handle...see 3 machetes (small Pemon-style)
•1 axe without handle...see 3 machetes (small Pemon-style)
•1 hatchet...see 3 machetes (small Pemon-style)
•9 pairs rubber boots...feet are going to get wet from either sweat or water anyway
•3 tall baby food jars...guess I'm an idiot, don't see a reason for them
•1 roll of screen mosquito net...see 9 mosquito nets

man you hit that nail right on the head....Except the gourds...as they get deeper into the forests there going to need them for water....and the baby food jars remind me of all the attempts that were made in Alaska to preserve the fish and make the jam...I just don't see that being done this season...(or maybe I'm thinking of another show)....

If you really think about it...there really is not much they should leave behind..With nine of them they should be able to handle quite a bit of gear. and they can just dump it along the way if its too much...right?

CanisKil
02-22-2011, 02:32 PM
....Except the gourds...as they get deeper into the forests there going to need them for water....

That's why I included the big gourd with the cork. And typically, in a jungle environment water isn't lacking. Again, like the skillet, I almost included them in the To Take list.

Thanks, joe!

Tony Torre
02-22-2011, 02:50 PM
I thought I saw them starting a fire with a fire steel.

Tony Torre
Miami Arnis Group
www.miamiarnisgroup.com

VenezuelaMichael
02-22-2011, 02:51 PM
I thought I saw them starting a fire with a fire steel.

Tony Torre
Miami Arnis Group
www.miamiarnisgroup.com

We were given a Magnesium flint starter in the pile of crap they left for us.

Tony Torre
02-22-2011, 03:17 PM
I made the decision to wear my sandals going down that cursed incline because I wanted to avoid an injury that would have taken me out of the game. The snake boots were required when we were in high risk snake areas. As much as possible I went barefoot. :)

If I read correctly you where allowed boots and sneakers. You chose to go as close to barefoot as possible in order to avoid injury. Would please explain why this would be an advantage over wearing boots.

Thank you,
Tony Torre
Miami Arnis Group
www.miamiarnisgroup.com

sprucepine
02-22-2011, 03:50 PM
As much as possible I went barefoot. :)

I do all my yard work barefoot. This helps keep my feet tough.
You guys were in a tropical environment, weren't you concerned about schistosoma and others nasty bugs that will burrow into your feet?

VenezuelaMichael
02-22-2011, 04:39 PM
If I read correctly you where allowed boots and sneakers. You chose to go as close to barefoot as possible in order to avoid injury. Would please explain why this would be an advantage over wearing boots.

Thank you,
Tony Torre
Miami Arnis Group
www.miamiarnisgroup.com

Your question is an excellent one; and I am happy to answer. As far as injuries go; going barefoot is likely an added risk. During the spring-summer months I work for the department of conservation here in Maine, and I do swamp bird surveys; in addition to other tasks.

I go barefoot when ever possible; and have been doing so for years; so my feet are conditioned; and I believe this strengthens the ankles. If you are always wearing ankle supports, in short order your ankle stops providing support. Thus requiring you to wear ankle supports. There are a lot of people on this planet running around without shoes.

In wet swampy conditions I find my feet breathe better and just seem to be happier if they are out in the open. Fewer concerns with foot fungus too.

When hiking difficult terrain, some sort of protection is a benefit obviously. But when going bare foot you are more aware, having bare feet is kind of like having an additional sense organ for me.

You become acutely aware of what you are walking on. How wet the ground is; and you are forced to pay close attention to what is going on down there. So one of the benefits is an enhanced awareness of the surroundings.

For me it also aids in being stealthy in the forest. Now as you might notice during the show; usually when we crossed streams I removed my snake boots and went barefoot. Most of the time, since I was the tallest I would lead the river crossings, and having bare feet enabled me to sense the texture and contour of the bottom. With bare feet you can “grasp” rocks, jam your feet into places shoes wouldn’t allow you to do.

Going barefoot isn’t for everyone, and it has it’s up and down sides. I try to balance them. But if given a choice I op for being barefoot in the forest. :)

VenezuelaMichael
02-22-2011, 04:44 PM
I was a little worried, but I asked the Pemons about it; and they told me there wasn't much to worry about in the jungle. I was told that you could get those if you walked barefoot around where there keep dogs.

pureoceanbreeze
02-22-2011, 06:25 PM
Rob Lacombe here again. Wow. This is one of the coolest threads out there. Really interesting arguments. Again, the only strange thing about this is unlike other adventures I've had, we had no clue where we were going or what we were going to encounter in terms of environment, so for me, I was thinking mostly about my time in the jungles of Africa. The main items for me were the clothing on our backs, canteens, mosquito nets, fishing line/hooks, fire starter and the machetes. You can pretty much do anything or make anything with these and somewhat protect yourself from poisonous insects/snakes. All the rest were luxury items we were fortunate enough to find.

pureoceanbreeze
02-22-2011, 06:28 PM
And those muck boots were the most annoying thing ever! I totally agree with ya'll on that but like Michael says, we were forced to wear them at times even though the snakes are barely on the ground anyway...

petrifiedwood
02-22-2011, 06:39 PM
And those muck boots were the most annoying thing ever! I totally agree with ya'll on that but like Michael says, we were forced to wear them at times even though the snakes are barely on the ground anyway...

So who made the decisions as to when you were required to wear the boots, and when you could remove them?

pureoceanbreeze
02-22-2011, 07:23 PM
So who made the decisions as to when you were required to wear the boots, and when you could remove them?

There was a safety guy... but I think he quit around day 4 cause he couldn't guarantee our safety. Haha. Anyway, I'm not sure if I can be specific but there were a few occasions...

CanisKil
02-22-2011, 09:19 PM
There was a safety guy... but I think he quit around day 4 cause he couldn't guarantee our safety. Haha. Anyway, I'm not sure if I can be specific but there were a few occasions...

That is hilarious!