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VinoNoir
04-28-2011, 12:55 AM
Wondering if anyone could tell me what's the best type of cheese to backpack with? And when I say cheese, I mean REAL cheese... No cheese whiz, or plastic wrapped yellow plastic.

How long will it last under "normal" spring/summer conditions? What's the best way to carry it, i.e - wrapped in cheese cloth, saran wrap etc. ?

Thanks

mischief
04-28-2011, 01:10 AM
I carry hard cheese covered with bees wax.The longest I used it was 2 weeks and that was aboard a cat. sail boat,

Looker
04-28-2011, 01:51 AM
I would think that most any of the dry, hard cheeses would work. Maybe some Gouda? it's not as dry or hard as many of the others, but it's typically already covered with wax when you buy it.

kankcamping
04-28-2011, 02:04 AM
Yeah I vote for the dry hard cheeses. If you are a cheese snob like me you can find some wonderful strong cheeses near the deli counter at most grocery stores.

Cheese + pizza sauce + Bannock = awesomeness

If you want to get real snobby you can pack in some dehydrated mushrooms, its funny though....once everyone digs into the backpacking pizza....mysteriously all the comments from the peanut gallery stop.

madmax
04-28-2011, 04:12 AM
I always take cheese. Sometimes 2 or 3 different kinds. Great snack. Lasts a good while even in the heat.

solocanoe
04-28-2011, 04:16 AM
yep - always the hard cheeses - they'll last longer than you probably want to stay lost! :)

my problem is trying to ration it from myself - even the parmesean block starts looking good for giant bites after awhile. :D

GreyOne
04-28-2011, 04:18 AM
Just plain old cheddar blocks will last 3-4 days, and theat is long enough to have it all eaten, so win-win. :)

Ahnkochee
04-28-2011, 04:29 AM
I prefer Romano Pecorrino cheese. dry yet sliceable.

Arrowolf
04-28-2011, 05:29 AM
Parmesan works pretty good. Cheddar will work if its gonna be cold otherwise it sweats out oil.

dwightp
04-28-2011, 08:21 AM
Just plain old cheddar blocks will last 3-4 days, and theat is long enough to have it all eaten, so win-win. :)

I've carried it for 5-6 on a couple of occasions. You're right, it will last longer than you think, unrefrigerated.

Bush Otter
04-28-2011, 10:11 AM
Powerful stuff that cheese, hard cheese stores better I am fond of Belgian Gouda (not a real hard cheese ) but it gets strong fast in the heat.

karlsefni01
04-28-2011, 11:05 AM
I like taking a block of sharp cheddar. I never worry about mold as I just cut it off anyway.

Leif
04-28-2011, 11:23 AM
Gramps and I would pick up a brick of extra sharp cheddar from a local maker to take in with us.

lepercan
04-28-2011, 12:17 PM
Dip cheddar into cooling melted wax (Gulf is OK). As you use it split the wax take off what you need, push the wax back up and seal. Keeps real well.
Lep

nothinghead
04-28-2011, 01:07 PM
I brought a block of sharp cheddar on a three day hiking trip last weekend. No refrigeration or anything different from the non perishables in my pack and I was still eating it on Monday after I returned. No issues so far, though I do have a wicked strong stomach. I personally prefer the hard and sharp cheeses and feel they hold better too.

Pinebaron
04-28-2011, 02:40 PM
I like good cheese but don't necessarily get real picky while in the woods as everything seems to taste better anyhow. I like to buy those baby bells. Little gouda cheeses that are about the size of a silver dollar and 1/2" thick. They are covered in wax and one is usually good for a meal so I can open one, eat it, and the rest are still sealed until needed. Most food stores have them.

Trail Dust
04-28-2011, 03:06 PM
There seems to be as many ways to carry cheese as there are the variety of cheeses.

The hard cheeses hold up best in the bush or on the trail. No question about it. Some folks like to carry their cheese in linen or cotton bags, others will actually paint their cheese in cheese wax (you can purchase this online). Wrapping in cheese cloth and then in heavy paper is another favorite as is wrapping in wax paper. I know one fella that will wrap his cheese in cabbage leaves then in a linen bag and swears there is nothing that works better. I haven't tried that one.

Personally, I really like to carry an aged or smoked Gouda on the trail. Mozzarella, occasionally, in the small, waxed singles. I will wrap the Gouda in parchment paper, then in a durable heavy brown paper and tied. I can usually get several good days out of the cheese, even in warmer temperatures. Of course, by then, the outdoor hunger has kicked in and the cheese cheerfully disappears before it has had a chance to mold. :)

VinoNoir
04-28-2011, 09:29 PM
yep - always the hard cheeses - they'll last longer than you probably want to stay lost! :)

my problem is trying to ration it from myself - even the parmesean block starts looking good for giant bites after awhile. :D

I know that will certainly be a problem for me! Cant seem to stop nibblin'..

VinoNoir
04-28-2011, 09:33 PM
I like taking a block of sharp cheddar. I never worry about mold as I just cut it off anyway.

My grand-father would do the same thing. I always thought it was unsafe as a child, but I suppose it makes perfect sense. I've always appreciated his dression era mentality.

VinoNoir
04-28-2011, 09:37 PM
Dip cheddar into cooling melted wax (Gulf is OK). As you use it split the wax take off what you need, push the wax back up and seal. Keeps real well.
Lep

Thats a great idea. I will definitely try that. But what is "Gulf"?

Trekon86
04-28-2011, 10:08 PM
Gulf wax = paraffin canning wax:)
PMZ

Trekon86
04-28-2011, 10:09 PM
556mp introduced me to asiago cheese, which we added into some bannock and cooked over a twisty stick.

Dang that was good:)
PMZ

Trail Dust
04-28-2011, 10:54 PM
http://www.cheesemaking.com/store/i/is.aspx?path=/Images/productimages/WaxRed1.jpg&lr=t&bw=575&bh=575

PMSteve
04-28-2011, 11:55 PM
Hard Monterrey Jack kept in cheese cloth. Will keep a lot longer than it lasts, if you know what I mean.

Blazin
04-29-2011, 12:08 AM
I always take extra sharp cheddar. Great flavor and its always lasted long enough for me to eat it.

VinoNoir
04-29-2011, 12:09 AM
Gulf wax = paraffin canning wax:)
PMZ

Thanks, bro. I'll be picking some up, and waxing the hell outta some cheese:4:

Crossed Arrows
04-29-2011, 12:12 AM
Great thread, great subject. Sure beats discussions about favorite MRE menues.

Small portions of several types of hard cheese. I especially like parmesan and pecorino because they are good with many cooked dishes and very nice as a small quantity to nibble on with a piece of fruit and/or bread.

If the cheese gets fuzzy, simply unstrap your razorsharp doublebladed lumberjack axe and shave off the fuzz.

Hard cheese is a wonderful food to take to the field because it provides a lot of calories, nutrients and pleasure for not much weight.

wolfy
04-29-2011, 12:21 AM
I hate to say this, but plain old Velveeta doesn't need refrigeration and will last forever with all of the preservatives that it has in it. We usually take a sizeable portion of Jarlsberg with us, too.

solocanoe
04-29-2011, 09:33 AM
well, I know I keep going back to my old grandma born in 1900...but she grew up without refridgeration and always kept hard cheeses 'on purpose' with some mold on it.

in the early days of penicillin - when it was rare I guess - they used to eat the mold on purpose for it's healing properties. I remember even being given some myself when I was sick with 'this or that' illness as a child.

I'm not sure if it's really 'healing' or not...but I've never wasted a bit of cheese since just because of a little mold - I eat it. :)

xj35s
04-29-2011, 10:58 AM
I can't believe there is no mention of salami or pepperoni. I know it's a cheese thread but how can you pack one without the other ? It too needs no refrigeration. Just cut the dry end off and use it as bait.

I love all cheese. Isn't it acceptable to soak the cheese cloth in vinegar to extend the life of cheese ? I think they did that on the tall ships....

Bush Otter
04-29-2011, 10:59 AM
I like it solocanoe, this forum maybe one of the only places where eating moldy cheese is concidered a good thing.

mike olson
04-29-2011, 12:02 PM
fomunda cheese its a goda !:18:

Adam
04-29-2011, 01:43 PM
Seems I read somewhere that the sharp cheeses keep better like sharp cheddar instead of mild cheddar. Any experience with that?

wolfy
04-29-2011, 04:03 PM
Take bleu cheese and you're one up on the mold problem to begin with....no worries!

VinoNoir
12-10-2012, 05:49 PM
I've come to taking cheddar and hard Romano cheese, wrapped in a paper bag with wax paper. Couple these with some pepperoni and tortillas and you're set.

As of late, I've been interested in trying to take a good crumbly Danish Bleu. LOVE LOVE LOVE that stuff! A little goes a looooong way. But its just so darned messy and soft, Id think it would be hell to transport.

Anyway, here's to CHEESE. :32:

dragon383
12-10-2012, 05:58 PM
Yeah I vote for the dry hard cheeses. If you are a cheese snob like me you can find some wonderful strong cheeses near the deli counter at most grocery stores.

Cheese + pizza sauce + Bannock = awesomeness

If you want to get real snobby you can pack in some dehydrated mushrooms, its funny though....once everyone digs into the backpacking pizza....mysteriously all the comments from the peanut gallery stop.

or you can get bushcrafty snobby and go pick your own mushrooms :)

adkwalker
12-10-2012, 06:52 PM
XXX sharp cheddar NY cheese an apple and a bag of venison jerk good to go.

VinoNoir
12-10-2012, 08:13 PM
XXX sharp cheddar NY cheese an apple and a bag of venison jerk good to go.

Most definitely. Add a baguette, or some other crusty loaf, and you've got heaven on earth right there in your pack..

injun51
12-10-2012, 08:50 PM
Baby bells. Each is waxed and ready to eat. They even come in a lite version.

sbkittrell
12-10-2012, 09:21 PM
Cheddar is good and if you get any mold on it after a few days, you can just slice that part off and eat the inner part.

cellis
12-10-2012, 09:51 PM
Nobody has mentioned Edam (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edam_(cheese)).


Edam ages and travels well, and does not spoil; it only hardens. These qualities (among others) made it the world's most popular cheese between the 14th and 18th centuries, both at sea and in remote colonies.

VinoNoir
12-10-2012, 09:57 PM
Nobody has mentioned Edam (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edam_(cheese)).
I will have to try this. I love that it says the taste gets "sharper as it ages". Could be a winner.

DarkXstar
12-10-2012, 10:20 PM
When i take cheese i usually take Hoffmans super sharp cheddar or pecorino romano both i just wrap in cotton and go

treefrog
12-10-2012, 10:26 PM
Halloum cheese can tolerate non-refrigerated conditions for a while, and the best thing about it is you can grill it over the campfire without
it melting and falling apart.

Craíc
12-10-2012, 11:28 PM
+1 on the cheddar blocks, as long as you don't mind sweaty cheese.

kubota tim
12-11-2012, 12:41 AM
my problem is it wouldn't last long enough or, I couldnt carry enough to last, not sure which really.

cellis
12-11-2012, 06:16 AM
I will have to try this. I love that it says the taste gets "sharper as it ages". Could be a winner.
It's really good kind of like a creamier parmesan. Another thing I thought of is my buddy who is French taught me with the soft cheeses such as brie they get much better if you leave them out for a day or so (depending on the weather) and he is right, I do it with all I buy now. So for a couple day trip or so a nice soft cheese might work too.

Also if we are just gonna talk cheeses. Try a nicely aged comte if you ever feel like getting addicted to something fast. And I lust after Fourme d'Ambert (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fourme_d%27Ambert) if you can find it.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d8/Fourme_d%27Ambert_entamée.jpg/550px-Fourme_d%27Ambert_entamée.jpg

Scott Allen
12-11-2012, 07:47 AM
As most everyone has said; hard cheeses. I spray brown wrapping paper with cooking spray and wrap the cheese in that. It will keep without drying out for at least a week, but I can't carry enough to last me that long! :)

Scott

Ditch
12-11-2012, 08:05 AM
Donkey cheese is the only way to go. Too bad this guy bought all of it.

http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/tennis-busted-racquet/novak-djokovic-buying-world-entire-supply-donkey-cheese-152716656--ten.html

VinoNoir
12-11-2012, 12:31 PM
It's really good kind of like a creamier parmesan. Another thing I thought of is my buddy who is French taught me with the soft cheeses such as brie they get much better if you leave them out for a day or so (depending on the weather) and he is right, I do it with all I buy now. So for a couple day trip or so a nice soft cheese might work too.

Also if we are just gonna talk cheeses. Try a nicely aged comte if you ever feel like getting addicted to something fast. And I lust after Fourme d'Ambert (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fourme_d%27Ambert) if you can find it.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d8/Fourme_d%27Ambert_entamée.jpg/550px-Fourme_d%27Ambert_entamée.jpg

Boy does that look delicious! Spread that on a piece of baguette or a nice rye cracker. Add a pear slice, and a glass of Cabernet Sauvignon...MMmmmmm


Donkey cheese is the only way to go. Too bad this guy bought all of it.

http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/tennis-busted-racquet/novak-djokovic-buying-world-entire-supply-donkey-cheese-152716656--ten.html

Wow..just wow. I'd have to say the words "Donkey milk" and "Donkey cheese" bring up more to mind than eating...

Skyy
12-23-2012, 01:27 AM
Parmesan works pretty good. Cheddar will work if its gonna be cold otherwise it sweats out oil.

Sweaty cheddar is mighty fine on a hot day on the trail. Especially with some fresh wild onions and dandelion greens

darodalaf
12-23-2012, 10:44 AM
Shoot, years ago I took a whole wheel of brie on a 5 day winter outing. It wasn't extreme weather, highs in the lower 40s, plenty cool enough to keep it solid, and I got a lot of sideways looks by my comrades as they ate their jelly sandwiches and Mountain House, but I'm a cheese snob, what can I say.

In warmer weather, hard cheeses will retain their 'composure', but me, I like sweaty cheddar, gouda, and Jarlsberg, et al., like a rare treat.

Second pepperoni and summer sausages, too.

battle.munky
12-23-2012, 11:12 AM
Babybels can also be used as a source of fuel/firestarter. If you eat the cheese and then stuff the wax husk with tp, you can make a candle-esque thing that will burn for quite a while. It is good for starting damp tinder since you have the benefit of burn time. Not the end all be all for doing so, but you get a second use out of it as well. I reckon the gulf wax could be used as well.