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woodswatcher
10-03-2011, 03:57 PM
I plan to do some winter camping this year and being from Alabama I don't know much about winter camping. I am interested now as I am expecting heavy winter weather this year. I thought I would camp and then do some deer hunting the next day, probably just an over night type outing. I have searched this forum and am havibg trouble finding a safe idea on how to keep a tent heated. I would rather use, as suggested by some threads, candle power, but I would like other's tried and tested input. Thanks

McPherson
10-03-2011, 04:15 PM
What kind of tent?

Tom's Backwood's
10-03-2011, 04:21 PM
I could tell ya but the wife wouldn't want me to....lol....

sorry I couldn't resist ....hehe

illiteratti
10-03-2011, 04:21 PM
I just use a tarp, so I can get away with a buddy burner (I think that's what they are called) but that's only if I can't have a fire. It actually helps quite a bit, but I don't sleep with it burning, I'd probably knock it over or something else just as stupid.

Jason
10-03-2011, 04:23 PM
Don't heat it, just get in a good sleeping bag, use a good pad, and wear some polypro. You should be fine. Otherwise I'd go with the tarp and a long fire.

Misanthrope
10-03-2011, 04:25 PM
I'm only aware of two kinds of winter camps.... Hot camps and cold... Hot camps involve heavy canvas tents and stoves, pulks, etc. Cold camps are just like they sound, unheated tents and shelters...

Read up on Mors.. The site is down now, but http://www.wintertrekking.com/ is a great winter camping resource..

I would strongly advise against any heat source other than a Nalgene of boiling water in a nylon shelter...

gwynn1975
10-03-2011, 04:25 PM
I agree with the above mentioned methods..

A good sleeping bag, a good mat/sleeping pad, and a ground cloth/footprint for the tent. If you buy a good sleeping bag, sleep in it naked or in just your underwear. That way, your body heat will actually warm the inside of your bag. Just make sure your sleeping pad is full length.

Mississippi Rob
10-03-2011, 04:29 PM
woodswatcher, I backpack ALOT in AL in the coldest times of the year. I never even attempt to heat my tent. Get a good sleeping bag (system) and rely on that to keep you warm. That is the safest way.

:EDIT: I started writing this before all the other responses were posted. Seems most of us are on the same page.

Sweeneyguy
10-03-2011, 04:32 PM
Natural Gas....:26:

Mississippi Rob
10-03-2011, 04:33 PM
Another trick I have used in very cold weather is a Nalgene water full of hot water that I put in my sleeping bag between my legs. Works well.

DerekH
10-03-2011, 04:34 PM
I was going to say the after effects of a particularly good chili, but it appears my efforts would be in vain.

woodswatcher
10-03-2011, 04:35 PM
Thanks guys

rg598
10-03-2011, 04:37 PM
If you are interested in a heated relatively low weight shelter, try something like the Titanium Goat (http://www.titaniumgoat.com/products.html)shelters.

However, most people don't use heated shelters. Like people above have said, use a good sleeping bag and pad.

joe305
10-03-2011, 04:38 PM
A good foot print Outside the tent
Sleep inside on top of a good Mat
Sleep in a good Sleeping bag
and make sure your tent has adequate ventilation(No condensation)
Good to go!!!
.
.
.
..

BENCH
10-03-2011, 04:42 PM
A buddy of mine heats a of rock the size of a small bowling ball, and raps it in a cotton towel, and stuffs it in the foot of his sleeping bag.

He forgot his cotton towel once, and maybe over heated his rock. Long story short, his rock melted his poly towel, and then melted his sleeping bag. How it didn't melt his poly cot is beyond me.

He then went out and bought a good bag.

gwynn1975
10-03-2011, 04:42 PM
I forgot to mention that as long as nothing is wet, I usually put all my clothes in my sleeping bag with me, that way they will be warmer for getting dressed in the morning.

Leather&Wool
10-03-2011, 04:48 PM
+1 on a cold camp and using a good sleeping bag and pad. I use a hanging candle lantern in tent (only when awake). While it will not add much heat in a tent, it will make it seem warmer as any flame seems to comfort the soul. Plus you can defrost you hands over it. If you use nalgene water bottles, fill them with hot water and put them in your empty boots so they are not frozen in the morning.

BENCH
10-03-2011, 05:07 PM
I forgot to mention that as long as nothing is wet, I usually put all my clothes in my sleeping bag with me, that way they will be warmer for getting dressed in the morning.


I do the same.

Kimber Custom II
10-03-2011, 05:53 PM
Don't heat it, just get in a good sleeping bag, use a good pad, and wear some polypro. You should be fine. Otherwise I'd go with the tarp and a long fire.

x 2

Aeteocles
10-03-2011, 06:01 PM
+1 on a cold camp and using a good sleeping bag and pad. I use a hanging candle lantern in tent (only when awake). While it will not add much heat in a tent, it will make it seem warmer as any flame seems to comfort the soul. Plus you can defrost you hands over it. If you use nalgene water bottles, fill them with hot water and put them in your empty boots so they are not frozen in the morning.

Don't under estimate the warming power of a candle.

A single candle can easily keep the inside of a shelter several degrees warmer than without.

I went to a wedding last month in Sonoma, CA. Daytime temperatures were beautiful, in the mid and high 70's. The wedding was outside, and the temperature quickly dipped into the 50's. Many of the guests, my date included, were not dressed warmly enough.

I set 2 tea lights (taken from the centerpieces) and set them on the ground underneath the table. The floor length table cloths made a nice little shelter for everyone's legs.

spyder1958
10-03-2011, 06:03 PM
You could also sandwich your sleeping bag between two space blankets to help if your tent camping. If it gets real cold. But when camping in middle Ga. all I've used in past years is as stated above, good bag and pad.

billybass
10-03-2011, 06:05 PM
With a wood stove!
28180

Uhmerikun
10-03-2011, 07:49 PM
Well, there's several ways to keep warm in the winter. Some people prefer sleeping bags while others prefer a fire or heater of some kind. I personally have a feeling that I'll be going for the sleeping bag route when this winter rolls around since everything is so dry down here and all. Don't get me wrong, though; I'm all for a cozy campfire and what not but not at the expense of another thousand-acre outbreak.

*Once again, I gotta' thank my firefighters on that note!

riverjoe
10-03-2011, 08:26 PM
Here's what I use .

me about 2 hours toIt takes put it together and I probabley wouldn't want to move it every 2 weeks , but it could be done .

http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/winterhooch/IMG_0269.jpg

http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/winterhooch/IMG_0267.jpg

I picture it here with floor laying on roof for summer use (reflect heat )

Here is inside pics with liner down over windows and homemade wood burner in place . Incidently I test burned that liner a number of times and the aluminum side wont really burn . The white PVC side does ofcourse but as long as aluminum side is toward the wood burner it offers at least some protection . I put a fiber glass welders blanket around the double sleeve penetration of the roof . I used plier stapler instead of sewing machine ng . http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/winterbugout/IMG_0274.jpg
And here is a pic of an attempt to carry all this into the woods .
http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/winterbugout/IMG_0327.jpg

MK-9
10-03-2011, 08:36 PM
Don't heat it, just get in a good sleeping bag, use a good pad, and wear some polypro. You should be fine. Otherwise I'd go with the tarp and a long fire.

Definitely the method I'd go with.

And avoid the methane heating method if at all possible.

Old Hickory
10-03-2011, 09:45 PM
http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/winterhooch/IMG_0267.jpg

I picture it here with floor laying on roof for summer use (reflect heat )


Is that silver insulation Reflectix? Or is it some sort of huge windshield reflector?

g8rgar
10-03-2011, 10:00 PM
A fat woman works great!

Crafter
10-03-2011, 10:05 PM
Don't heat it, just get in a good sleeping bag, use a good pad, and wear some polypro. You should be fine. Otherwise I'd go with the tarp and a long fire.

+1 for this, and, : my favorite tool for winter camping:
http://planetgreen.discovery.com/home-garden/hot-water-bottle-bed.html

donal
10-03-2011, 10:23 PM
I use small candle lanterns, or a small propane lantern...jest be severely careful.

Swede6.5x55
10-03-2011, 10:31 PM
I heard that Ray Mears splits a log in qaurters, and then lights some tinder between the logs, and then the fire is self sustaining. You can boil, or cook on it, just depends on the tent.

Dirtymike
10-03-2011, 10:38 PM
I have a small kelty 2 man tent with a vestible. I hang the vestible up and let the warmth from a little buddy heater get trapped in the tent vestible and radiate the heat. It sure did make it nice. I feel safe with it since it is outside the tent and not close enough to catch on fire. Boy it sure does suck when the propane runs out in the early am.

akbound
10-03-2011, 10:46 PM
I forgot to mention that as long as nothing is wet, I usually put all my clothes in my sleeping bag with me, that way they will be warmer for getting dressed in the morning.

Instead of placing the clothes into the bag with me, I lay them all out on the sleeping pad and then unroll the bag right on top of clothes and pad. The clothing helps provide a little extra insulation and padding, and they collect some residual heat without introducing dirt or debris into the bag. The socks however do go into the "foot" of the sleeping bag if they are neither wet or excessively dirty. Also a sleeping cap of some sort makes a big difference when it comes to staying warm on a cold winter night.

In a small tent a simple candle lantern will help to knock off the chill. Burn it for thirty minutes of so (minimum) prior to "undressing for bed" and then hop in the bag quickly; put out the fire/candle prior to going to sleep. In the morning awake half an hour before you intend to crawl out of the bag and relight the candle to once again "knock the chill off"; then quickly rise and dress insuring to put out the fire/candle again prior to leaving the tent.

If you are camping in a canvas tent you may want to build and maintain a "reflected" fire outside the front of the tent, leaving the tent open/ajar to gather the heat. Or in more established camps set up and burn a wood/kerosene or gas heater inside the tent, (but this requires appropriate measures to be taken so as not to endanger all persons staying in the tent). The two hazards being either fire or carbon monoxide.

HorseSoldier
10-03-2011, 11:16 PM
A couple chemical hand/foot warmers in the sleeping bag with you can provide a little creature comfort getting into a cold bag, but I agree with the previous posters that a quality sleeping bag is the answer without external heat.

DirtySouth
10-04-2011, 08:05 AM
I usually only hike/camp here in GA during the cool/cold months because the humidity is, well you know.

A lot of suggestions here but the easiest and safest way to be warm while camping in the cold, is insulation. That means a good winter bag and some type of pad to keep you off the ground, which will suck the heat right out of you by the way.

Heaters add weight, added risk, and extra cost. The general rule of thumb is to get a sleeping bag rated at 10*-15* lower than the temperature that you plan on camping in. The rated temps on sleeping bags are at best, good enough to keep you from freezing, but you can still be cold unless you're a warm sleeper.

I also pack a silk sleeping bag liner which serves two purposes. The first is it keeps my sleeping bags from getting dirty as quickly, and two it adds warmth (if I had to guess, I'd say 5*-10* warmth). Silk is a very good natural insulator. Another trick that I use and that has been mentioned is the Nalgene bottle with hot water stuffed into the bottom of your bag. You can use a rock as well but be sure to wrap it or it may melt anything synthetic.

Try to keep away from condensation. It may sound silly, but ventilation is a must, which is why tarps work so well. Granted you don't want the wind howling down your neck all night, but a little ventilation will go a long way.

Someone mentioned sandwiching yourself between two space blankets, but in my experience I nearly froze while using a space blanket and improper sleeping bag. We were up in the Cohutta Wilderness in Feb. and had to cross Jack's River on two occasions and it was cold. I somehow managed to find a deep hole when making my first crossing and ended up chest deep. With air temps in the 40*'s and the water temps probably not much higher than that, I had a chill set in. We made camp, got a fire going and I got my clothes changed out and warmed up. When it was time to bed down, I was sleeping under the stars that night which would've been nice had I not grabbed my warm weather bag by mistake. I ended up wrapping a space blanket around me throughout the night and started sweating which is not good. Needless to say I didn't sleep well that night and had a chill the whole next day.

Out of all the suggestions here, a good bag is going to make your camping experience a comfortable one, while some of the other suggestions will make it survivable.

sons of scotland
10-04-2011, 08:50 AM
like everybody else said, good sleeping bag, sleeping pad, footprint, but also i always wear some type of cotton hat with a hooded sweatshirt over top of the hat for extra warmth.

xj35s
10-04-2011, 09:41 AM
In my 18 years of farming I had everyone fooled that I was hot blooded and could withstand the cold weather.

My secret, Many layers. wool socks, thermals, and denim, Whals bibs from walmart as good as Carhart if not out of the same facctory, and a good hat.

This is about heating a tent though right ? I haven't done much winter tent camping but have slept in a snow cave. I love Beeswax candles and heated rocks. Bee careful in bear country though.

In severe weather and sub 20* I might use a jon-e hand warmer in a chest pocket.

riverjoe
10-04-2011, 10:35 AM
Is that silver insulation Reflectix? Or is it some sort of huge windshield reflector?

Commonly called duct wrap . Bubble type insulation , PVC one side aluminum other side . I buy rolls at local auction house for 15 bucks each . Seconds from some factory somewhere I guess .

Incidently the day my wife took that picture I aborted my trip and got out of the denim and cotton long johns and changed to silky type GI long johns with light wool dress pants and then just shiny cotton pants over that .
High of about 15 degrees that day .

Shorty
10-04-2011, 10:38 AM
All this talk of flames near highly flamable tents is freaking me out!! DANGEROUS!!!!!!!!!!!

Option 1. get a great bag and pad
Option 2. Cover your bag with a wool blanket and have a long-log fire with no tent
Option 3. watch Jerimiah Johnson again and replicate...not too many coals though!! "Saw it right off!!"

I also like to do a tarp rig with a space blanket duct-taped on the inside to reflect. amazing how warm that is with even a small fire in front.

DanTheOutDoorMan
10-04-2011, 10:44 AM
A beautiful woman.

Panzer
10-04-2011, 02:53 PM
Beans

Moondog55
10-04-2011, 04:45 PM
I have found that a single candle can take the edge off the temperature providing you are using a proper winter rated or high mountain expedition tent.

http://candlelantern.com/original.html

Often used a candle to warm a tent when I took my young kids ski touring, but you still need the full roll-call of pad and winter rated sleeping bag

stillscout
10-04-2011, 06:06 PM
Natural Gas....:26:

And a bic lighter! :9:

hootyhoo
10-04-2011, 08:48 PM
With a 70 pound dog. The metabolism of a dog is just about a perfect rate for heating a small tent. It only requires a couple pounds of food per day, which it can carry for you. Natures perfect tent heater.

Flintlock
10-04-2011, 09:40 PM
With a wood stove.

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q35/FirePiston/Cnv0275.jpg

Jas
10-05-2011, 05:51 AM
Sure: The sleeping bag is the most important for camping in an unheated tent during the winter (I've heard laughter say: there are sleeping bags, that withstand awful cold temperatures, only the campers don't). Are you planning to take some gas-lamp with you: This could be a relatively safe tent heating system. Just make sure not to fall asleep before having turned of the lamp.

Ironwood
10-05-2011, 06:05 AM
Natural Gas....:26:

Literally stole my thunder!!:46:

ElectriCains
10-10-2011, 08:53 PM
I just got one of those Mr. Heater portable buddies. It is safe for indoor use and shuts off if the oxygen gets too low or it tips over. Haven't had a chance to try it yet though.

Old Hickory
10-10-2011, 11:47 PM
I just got one of those Mr. Heater portable buddies. It is safe for indoor use and shuts off if the oxygen gets too low or it tips over. Haven't had a chance to try it yet though.

I have one and use it in my cabin tent when hunting. I turn it on when the sun goes down. It heats the tent up nicely. When I turn in, I shut it off. I do not have any source of combustion running while I'm asleep.

When I wake up in the morning, I turn it on. It chases the chill away in just a few minutes. Great way to warm your hands and feet.

I've experimented with it and the slightest movement shuts it off instantly.

Jin
10-11-2011, 12:30 AM
As Horsesoilder said, if ya wanna get warm, toss a couple of chemical glove warmer thingys in your bag. Low weight, works for sure if the other stuff doesn't. Big bonus you don't have to worry about burning to death, suffocating, or other negative effects lol.

Loosearrow
10-11-2011, 06:57 AM
Here's what I use .

me about 2 hours toIt takes put it together and I probabley wouldn't want to move it every 2 weeks , but it could be done .

http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/winterhooch/IMG_0269.jpg

http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/winterhooch/IMG_0267.jpg

I picture it here with floor laying on roof for summer use (reflect heat )

Here is inside pics with liner down over windows and homemade wood burner in place . Incidently I test burned that liner a number of times and the aluminum side wont really burn . The white PVC side does ofcourse but as long as aluminum side is toward the wood burner it offers at least some protection . I put a fiber glass welders blanket around the double sleeve penetration of the roof . I used plier stapler instead of sewing machine ng . http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/winterbugout/IMG_0274.jpg
And here is a pic of an attempt to carry all this into the woods .
http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/winterbugout/IMG_0327.jpg
Nice tent. I use an open fire in the tipi. I like your coffee pot as well. Neighbor died and I got all his old stuff. The coffee pot was with it. I had never seen one like it before. Two weeks later I found another for 5.00 at the goodwill store. Your tent looks somewhat like a baker tent. Homemade, right?

riverjoe
10-11-2011, 12:28 PM
Homemade for sure . Im trying to make a lighter weight version of it now . This time Im going to use some tent pegs to loose some weight . Also Im using material I bought at the local Amish dry goods store that is much lighter . Still based on the Baker Tent which I really like that design for winter because you can face the sun and need little heat .
I love that pot I think I got it at an auction for a few bucks . I have the percolater innards too which I was going to try leeching Acorns with .

ratherbecampin
10-11-2011, 01:38 PM
Heavy Breathing

Loosearrow
10-14-2011, 07:27 AM
Homemade for sure . Im trying to make a lighter weight version of it now . This time Im going to use some tent pegs to loose some weight . Also Im using material I bought at the local Amish dry goods store that is much lighter . Still based on the Baker Tent which I really like that design for winter because you can face the sun and need little heat .
I love that pot I think I got it at an auction for a few bucks . I have the percolater innards too which I was going to try leeching Acorns with .

Never thought about leaching acorns with one. I'll have to try that, thanks for the idea.

Angus McGunnigl
10-14-2011, 11:30 AM
I have used a propane heater many times. Ours has a low-oxygen shut off. Tip over shut off also. Approved for indoor use(lots of ventilation)
What we do is use it to "pre-heat" the tent a bit before everyone hits the rack for the night.
We turn it off before "lights out" and would never go to sleep with it still on.
This is wintertime car camping in a huge tent.
Mr Buddy brand.

kbamhi
10-14-2011, 01:20 PM
Nalgene bottles are great but those chemical hand warmers also help if you wake up in the middle of the night shivering. In cold weather I aways sleep in my long handles with my outer clothing placed in the bottom of my sleeping bag. They help keep your feet warm and when you put them on in the AM they help knock that morning chill off cause they are nice and toasty.

mdauben
10-14-2011, 07:08 PM
I've done a lot of cold weather camping in the past, including some in AK (fall, not winter, though!) and I never had anything to heat my tent unless you count a candle lantern. As others have said, a good sleeping bag rated for the temps you encounter, a good insulating sleeping pad (my choice is a good Thermarest) and a dry tent with a little ventilation (a totally sealed tent will often end up dripping condensation just from your exhalations over night) can see you through any temps you are likely to find.

longrifle54
10-14-2011, 07:58 PM
I use a wood burning stove! Of course the tent for that is a 8x8 canvas baker tent.

akabu
10-14-2011, 08:41 PM
Hot hands COSCO box ,keep some in each car and in my sleeping Bag gear with a head wear and change of sleep wear.

insector
10-16-2011, 03:11 PM
Well when the going gets frigid the wise find an abandoned cabin and install a makeshift fireplace and pack in a propane heater.

If not then you need a good ground pad, a bag rated to at least 20 below and a wind break..........you will need to rely on fire for heat........so bring different firestarters and a good blade that can baton or chop. A good saw may help for processing seasoned wood.

You better know what you are doing bro.......if you plan to dance with the winter beast and not get frost bit.................don't go alone and practice 1st.............practice makes perfect so start in the summer and fall and work into your winter time gear...............

it is much more dangerous (hypothermia) at and below freezing...........

YO

so my winter medicine consists of a good knife, a zippo, a firestriker and rod and 2 road flares.............those flares burn about 15 minutes each on their own in any weather (life savers they are). I also carry tinder of various sorts located in various kits in various places on my person and in my pack......

never travel in winter without a blade and fire...............


My apologies......DANG.........this belongs under medicine kit............

KCD1974
10-17-2011, 11:08 PM
I never even thought of the hand warmer idea...but I like that!

injun51
10-26-2011, 01:23 PM
I have 2 words for you body and heat. Put them in any order you like but i think you get my meaning. LOL

beekeeper
10-26-2011, 01:56 PM
1+ sleeping bag, pad, ect plus a *wool stocking cap- central NH to -20/30. Try different systems close to home in case you have to bale/wimp out. Below -30 a wood stove in my house.
* alot of heat is lost throu the great vessals in the head and neck. Simple cover them.

TheMightyMitch
10-26-2011, 11:08 PM
Great thread folks! My dad, brothers and I went car camping (my brothers are too wussie to go hiking :() in light snow, I froze my a$$ off before I realized my sleeping pad was flat :0
Great tips, I'll keep them in mind next time I'm in cold weather!
By the way, a dog does less than you think to warm a tent up, body heat wise. The best to do is cozy up by them :)

Rubicon_Dave
10-27-2011, 01:46 AM
When I'm four wheeling (car camping) I'll occasionally bring my ammo can stove which is just a small wood burning stove. I use this inside a canvas tent or a tarp A-frame with no worries.

When I'm backpacking I'll usually just cold camp or use a supershelter with the fire outside the shelter.

Google "Mors Kochanski Supershelter" and you'll see what it is...

Grey Ranger
10-27-2011, 11:42 AM
I hiked to the top of Mt. Killington in Vermont last fall and spent the night at the summit. My buddy and i were ill prepared, because we carried 3 season bags and the temperature dropped to 26 degrees.

This little trick worked like a charm.

Make a tripod of equally sized rocks on the floor of your tent.

Heat a 4th rock in the fire, and place it on top of the 3 rocks in your tent. The three rocks protect the tent floor from melting from the hot rock. If you have a cotton shirt or something that wont melt, bunch it up between the 3 rocks for added protection for the tent floor.

This kept my tent much warmer than i thought it would. i used a fairly large rock, maybe about the size of a gallon milk jug. i used 2 sturdy sticks to remove it from the fire and place it on its rest in my tent. it was still warm to the touch in the morning. you can also drape any cotton clothing you have over it (so long as its not too hot) and it will dry in a pinch.

Grey Ranger
10-27-2011, 12:27 PM
Several people mentioned putting their cloths in their bag with them. This is also a great idea because the additional layers will insulate you further. It doesn't just keep your cloths warm, but you as well.

Another trick mentioned before was a hot water bottle in the bag with you. This works great, but i find it works even better with a moderately hot rock from the fire. The rock retains heat much longer than the water. Wrap the rock in cotton, and stick it by your feet inside your sleeping bag. I've done that before, and it works very well.

I always carry 2 bandannas with me on any outdoor excursion. They are great multi-purpose pieces of kit, and they work very well in this application.

woodsinfire
10-27-2011, 03:05 PM
This company called Kifaru makes good teepee type tents, and they have several size stoves you can buy. www.kifaru.net

DirtySouth
10-27-2011, 07:55 PM
This company called Kifaru makes good teepee type tents, and they have several size stoves you can buy. www.kifaru.net

:54:


I just use a wood burning stove in my winter shelter.

http://dirtysouth.smugmug.com/Other/ParaTipi/i-gsJKRq5/1/M/ParaTipi-009-2-M.jpg


http://dirtysouth.smugmug.com/Other/ParaTipi/i-kcMhPcZ/1/M/ParaTipi-006-2-M.jpg

goinpostal
10-27-2011, 10:23 PM
When ever I was tent bound in sub zero temps in Alaska,I'd build either a cabin ridgeline style,or a single line tepee out of white sheets I had sewn together.This would go over my cheap Hillary 7'x7'dome tent.
Once it got cold enough.I would take a windex bottle full of cold water,and spray down the sheet tent until it was soaked,leaving only an entry flap dry.After it froze,I'd repeat this several times each day for a week.This made essentially an igloo that would stay about 30 degree's just from body heat as long as you stayed inside.That was with it 40below zero,and an added 50mph wind chill outside.
I also had an Airforce extreme cold,down mummy bag,with a treated canvas outer,and wool inner liner.
My dome tent was setup over either pine bows,or pallets covered in corregated cardboard.I had a slope suit that was supposed to be good to 120below zero,that kept you warm even if you got it wet,and that was to hot to wear untill the temp got under 20degrees.
If I were to use a heater,it would be one like Nutnfancy posted on Youtube.It's a 1qt paint can,stuffed with a roll of TP,that you soak in high test alcohol.One of these will burn all night.
It would be best set up inside of a single hole/half cinder block.Then it cant be tipped in the night,and the block will soak up,and radiate the heat from it.I keep one of these in the big rig incase I end up broke down and need heat.
Matt

akabu
10-27-2011, 10:42 PM
heat- start at the body core Hot hands pads, hot water bottle.. why heat up the whole interior of the tent[Unless zero/subzero] when you open the Fly whoose the heat goes out the door

Hiwa
10-27-2011, 10:42 PM
I've done a fair bit of cold weather tenting. Warmth is not too much of a worry as I have good clothes and bag , but condensation inside a tent can be a problem.
The thing is , a tent is only a few mil thick. It has pretty much zero insulation value. Zip it up tight and add breathing and perspiration to the mix and you will be in a cold as well as wet shelter. I always leave the window or screen open to allow most of the moisture to escape and depend on insulation and clothing for warmth.

An outfitter tent with a woodburning stove is another matter . It is a more comfortable set up in extreme weather but longer to set up and not easily transportable.

Zig
10-27-2011, 10:46 PM
It seems I'm not the first to mention the "lots of beans in the chili" method of heating...

For a tent in the dead of winter, I'll take the wood stove any way of the week. It let's you dry out your clothes which gather body moisture that doesn't evaporate in super cold temperatures.

For any temperatures above 0F I'm likely to be sleeping in my hammock, so extra insulation is my choice.

A good dog is also an excellent heater as hootyhoo pointed out. I wish it were possible to get my dog in my hammock with me, but with the claws and weight it's definitely a no go. She sleeps on a ground cloth.

Bullet Hole
10-28-2011, 10:32 PM
I'm from Bama as well. Do a lot of camping to trout fish on the Sispey. I use a 3 man tent and have found that a simple emergency candle in the can will warm a tent pretty fast.

CC U
10-31-2011, 01:18 PM
We use a 8x6 pop up ice fishing shelter, for ice fishing and even a couple of over nighters out on the ice. I scoop the snow off of the ice, and lay down a floor of the blue poly sleeping mats from walmart. The tent has a snow skirt, and I pile the snow over that to stop any drafts. There are two adjustable vents in the ceiling to control moisture, and we use a battery powered ceiling fan to blow the hot air back down. Keeping the humidity in the air low, is the key to staying warm. The tent is heated with a big buddy heater, and even with the 2 boys, ages 9 and 11, we have yet to have any issues with knocking over the heater or burns. I set up to cots on the outside walls, and I sleep in a folding chair with my feet on a bucket, due to lack of space. The big buddy with 1 burner can maintain a temp in the 60's, once the shelter heats up. I pull all the gear out in a sled, which weighs 51 lbs, including the fishing gear and electronics.
The shelter takes 10 minutes to set up, including augering the holes through the ice, making it portable to chase the fish, is the key to it's sales success. The purpose to my posting, is that they now have a thermal version, with a quilted lining. My thought is taking my 3 person, 3 season tent, and adding a couple of poncho liners over the dome, as a way to boost the thermal efficiency of a 3 seaon tent. The technology works for ice fishing, why not back packing.

PMSteve
10-31-2011, 01:51 PM
Don't buy cheap tents. I can't remember where I found the pic. If it was from a member here, feel free to take the credit. Thought it was "Cool"!

OzaawaaMigiziNini
10-31-2011, 01:59 PM
Beans.

Think about it...

MrKnobbie
10-31-2011, 02:16 PM
You know, I'm surprised no one has said it yet...
2 big deals in winter camping are calories and water.
I've had a good bag/pad and used several the tips and tricks mentioned here and been cold. Why? I ete junk and forgot to hydrate. A cup of hot sweet tea before bed does wonders for me. I've got buried under 6 inches of new snow at 11,000 on Mt Quandry Colorado, but stayed warm with a candle lantern and some high calorie food and hot tea. That is not to say that many, if not all, serious suggestions here are important to utilize. Just don't forget: Your metabolism makes heat too.

Andy BB
10-31-2011, 03:37 PM
Surprised that no-one's mentioned feet yet! Keeping them warm with thick wool socks/padded booties makes a world of difference to a good nights' sleep in your sleeping bag. A woolen jumper wrapped round them works well too.

Silverlion
10-31-2011, 04:19 PM
When I sleep in a tent, it's usually my small, $20 k-mart special. I have my Coleman max 15* bag, a blue walmart pad and a Coleman Catalytic heater. At 28* it'll keep it around 50* in the tent. I vent the tent via a 1" gap in the window. It makes a little condensation, but not enough to cause worry. These heaters are specifically made for indoor use. I'm not dead yet, so it must work.
Normally, when I winter camp, I use my Hennessy hammock and a 0* bag. The hammock is fitted with the Hennessy Supershelter. I stay nice and toasty. It's a real buzzkill when nature calls though.

StickyKnife
10-31-2011, 11:45 PM
I tried heating some softball sized rocks for winter camping several times. It works ok with practice, but for me it was more trouble than it was worth.

shogun6619
11-01-2011, 01:11 AM
A heat pack in a sock between my feet does wonders.

Dirtymike
11-01-2011, 04:07 AM
When ever I was tent bound in sub zero temps in Alaska,I'd build either a cabin ridgeline style,or a single line tepee out of white sheets I had sewn together.This would go over my cheap Hillary 7'x7'dome tent.
Once it got cold enough.I would take a windex bottle full of cold water,and spray down the sheet tent until it was soaked,leaving only an entry flap dry.After it froze,I'd repeat this several times each day for a week.This made essentially an igloo that would stay about 30 degree's just from body heat as long as you stayed inside.That was with it 40below zero,and an added 50mph wind chill outside.
I also had an Airforce extreme cold,down mummy bag,with a treated canvas outer,and wool inner liner.
My dome tent was setup over either pine bows,or pallets covered in corregated cardboard.I had a slope suit that was supposed to be good to 120below zero,that kept you warm even if you got it wet,and that was to hot to wear untill the temp got under 20degrees.
If I were to use a heater,it would be one like Nutnfancy posted on Youtube.It's a 1qt paint can,stuffed with a roll of TP,that you soak in high test alcohol.One of these will burn all night.
It would be best set up inside of a single hole/half cinder block.Then it cant be tipped in the night,and the block will soak up,and radiate the heat from it.I keep one of these in the big rig incase I end up broke down and need heat.
Matt
Your kidding right? Your sheets held up in 50mph winds. Or am i miss understanding you.

jerry
11-01-2011, 08:13 AM
I finally learned a few years back when I retired one sure fire way to keep my tent a toasty 70 degrees plus for an entire night regardless how cold it gets,, leave that sucker in the closet in the middle bedroom and don't break it out till the weather channel forecasts 70+ nights with no rain. Works every time for me.

All you younguns will learn that as time goes by, many new found pleasures just seem to be learned as one ages.

Actually in my younger years I would camp in cold weather,, 30s max,, but I wasn't having as much fun as I really thought I was having. But then I just wrapped up, wore thermals, used decent sleeping bags, etc etc and toughed it out. Getting up at 3 in the morning from a warm sleeping bag to go pee really sucked, I don't miss that part at all.

Being retired one can get spoiled and pick and choose and postpone outings for warmer and dryer trips.
I have found that I'd rather sit by the fire just for the fun of it than to try to get comfortable.
My dog digs 60 and 70 deg nights more too,, I think he does anyway.

santaman2000
11-01-2011, 09:01 AM
...Being retired one can get spoiled and pick and choose and postpone outings for warmer and dryer trips...

I'm 55 and retired too. But I still cain't postpone my trip til it's warm; deer season will be over by then.

Besides, I hate camping when the skeeters are buzzing.

Binalith
11-01-2011, 09:11 AM
I just camped for 2 months in MN, and though it didn't get very cold very often, there was some nights. after a particularly cold night about a week in, I took a page from kochanski's super-shelter plan and tied an emergency blanket over top of my tent and stretched my tarp over my tent and staked it down, now this should really only really be done with a newer/nicer tarp as the moisture transference in imminent when multiple layers are touching each other, but I just found some awesome tarps at the home despot and it worked great. throw in a wool blanket and it was quite warm.
BTW: found some cool ground tarps at lowes for very cheap, had no idea anyone besides people like us thought of that kind of stuff haha

edit: moisture transference will happen nice tarp or no it seems, I just played my odds and it didnt rain very much

Looker
11-01-2011, 09:21 AM
I heat my tent by sleeping in it!

Looker

Mannlicher
11-01-2011, 06:12 PM
I have not camped in REAL cold weather in ages, about 14F is the coldest I have seen in the past few years.
I have a good tent, a 4 season Eureka, and I use a cot, a thick foam pad, and blankets.
I remember to wear light gloves, and my wool cap. I am perfectly comfortable at temps well below freezing.

Woods Walker
11-16-2011, 03:17 AM
I use a packable wood stove.

http://i113.photobucket.com/albums/n220/Daytraderwon/IMG_4376.jpg

http://i113.photobucket.com/albums/n220/Daytraderwon/IMG_4273.jpg

I can boil, melt ice and snow, cook and kick back in subzero in my boxers if need be. Vented wood stoves can be had for less than 3 lbs including pipe and packdown smaller than a laptop. Granted smaller stoves can't run all night but going into the sleeping bag warm makes all the difference. A wood stove gives someone more options. It also burns very little wood but on the negatvie this fuel needs to be procesed more than a normal campfire.

Edit.

If I really want to turn up the heat this DIY heat exchanger gets packed. It could melt a plastic canteen a foot away. :D

http://i113.photobucket.com/albums/n220/Daytraderwon/IMG_5151.jpg

atvgod82
11-21-2011, 06:03 PM
I use a Mr. Buddy 18k heater that is hooked up to a 20lb propane cyclinder with a 5 ft hose. They are safe for indoors and the tank lasts a long time. You need to make sure that the top of it is not to close to the tent because it does get hot. I also use the Coleman magnetic fan that I got at Menards to move the air, it makes a big difference.

NoMoreOp4
11-21-2011, 06:49 PM
Be careful with those propane heaters! even if the tent has ventilation there is a chance of asphixiation, if you fall asleep albiet small. Most of the buddy heaters have auto offs if they fall over. I use a small buddy heater until right before I go to bed. Then I use rocks warmed by the fire, usually wrapped in cloth/anything that wont melt and put them against/under my body (sometimes difficult in a tent).

Some of my warmest nights in the winter have been in a built shelter taking advantage of a lot of heated rocks and using heat reflectors to maximize the heat of a small fire kept burning all night. The heat reflectors also keep out the wind.

Dearborn
11-21-2011, 07:05 PM
I have read a number of excellent posts, and I have to fall back on, "Situation dictates procedure." I have experienced 3 weeks of -30, one night of -45 and I once took a hypothermia victim to the coroner - who was frozen rock hard solid! I've known a few individuals who slept in wall tents with excellent sleeping bags and no stove - and they said they would use a wood stove the next time. I am a believer in a small wood stove with proper tent jack, flue pipe and spark arrester. Monitor it closely and you should do just fine.

A comment on fatal hypothermia: Several victims in my area experienced mental psychosis before they died. One removed his clothes, ran around on all fours and tried to bite his rescuers before he went into cardiac arrest. Build a fire early!

HillbillyBushcraft
11-21-2011, 07:19 PM
You could always use this method.




http://www.eaglehillgroup.net/5_dogs_on_bed_1199.jpg

Niflreika
11-23-2011, 02:19 AM
How do you heat your tent?


Super size can of beans and a lighter. :18:

Peacelovingirl
11-23-2011, 03:04 AM
I dont think this has been mentioned... and our climate here does not get as cold as other places but maybe you could try a fire bed / bury hot rocks from the fire pit before puting up the tent...? or hot water bottle bedwarmer

Something like this?
Fire Bed Construction for Wilderness Survival, Equip 2 Endure - YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FDwTKAWhLfg)[/URL]

Rubicon_Dave
11-23-2011, 09:02 PM
Fire beds do work but they require a lot of prep and time as you can already see in the video. This is more work than I would want to do for simply heating a tent. I've always understood the firebed to be an option when you didn't have a shelter.

I believe you would also have to wait for the firebed to be ready before you could actually place the tent over it... unless of course you don't mind a tent full of smoke. The hot rocks transfer idea is a go.

Peacelovingirl
11-24-2011, 02:39 AM
Fire beds do work but they require a lot of prep and time as you can already see in the video. This is more work than I would want to do for simply heating a tent. I've always understood the firebed to be an option when you didn't have a shelter.

I believe you would also have to wait for the firebed to be ready before you could actually place the tent over it... unless of course you don't mind a tent full of smoke. The hot rocks transfer idea is a go.

Be careful with the hot rocks option sometimes rocks explode when you heat them...

jerry
11-24-2011, 04:05 AM
Be careful with the hot rocks option sometimes rocks explode when you heat them...

Campfire Rock Fire Ring exploding, fwiw
Pop Rocks - YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=84ovulnLCSE)

Some say it's the heated expansion of the moisture within porous rocks like sandstone,, sounds good to me.

But would it happen in an arid desert? Death Valley? any dry climate?

I have had sandstone fire ring that weren't river rocks crack and crumble but not explode like the rocks in this video.

donal
11-24-2011, 05:27 AM
Campfire Rock Fire Ring exploding, fwiw
Pop Rocks - YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=84ovulnLCSE)

Some say it's the heated expansion of the moisture within porous rocks like sandstone,, sounds good to me.

But would it happen in an arid desert? Death Valley? any dry climate?

I have had sandstone fire ring that weren't river rocks crack and crumble but not explode like the rocks in this video. Some rocks will contain air pockets..yep, they'll sometime pop on you ! I used to hear that creek-bed rocks commonly have this little flaw.

NoMoreOp4
11-24-2011, 05:28 PM
If you find the rock in or near the bank of a water source its probably not a good idea to use it!

wingman115
11-24-2011, 05:36 PM
No heat just a good solid sleeping bag will do... I've winter camped like that and have had no issues.

gunsmith
12-08-2011, 12:10 AM
I've camped in snow in below freezing and snow, a good tent,mat & bag will do the trick.

Hot stones? sounds good but even in the desert you probably have to be real careful, I live in the desert and we have an area that turns into a creek when it rains - hard to tell it is a creek so any thing that looks like water may channel thru it means it probably does if its wet outside.

However, I've thought about getting a little propane heater I've seen at Cabelas or some of those chemical heat patches I've seen at walgreens and wally world.

Also have considered battery powered clothes I've seen - it gets below zero here in the winter but its also the best time to hike/camp, bugs and snakes and ticks less active in cold weather.

chinookpilot77
12-08-2011, 06:54 AM
I usually eat beans any time I'm in the woods, so heating the tent isn't the problem...its the poisonous gas...

brian
12-08-2011, 07:16 AM
You can't pack it in but this is what I use when I can drive up to a camp.
http://i998.photobucket.com/albums/af107/Povertyhill/TentInside.jpg

riverjoe
12-09-2011, 01:59 PM
You can't pack it in but this is what I use when I can drive up to a camp.
http://i998.photobucket.com/albums/af107/Povertyhill/TentInside.jpg
It looks pulkable . Get a big enought pulk that is .

wildcrafter
12-26-2011, 03:17 AM
tent whats a tent use a tarp a good pad and a good bag. Just make sure you have a good fire going and lots of fire wood

CarbonEvergreens
12-26-2011, 02:09 PM
Buy some painter's plastic. Set up your tarp and then hang the plastic on the open sides by your fire. It creates a great little green house for little or no cost!

easy
01-01-2012, 10:56 AM
http://www.rei.com/product/637736/rei-candle-lantern-ready-kit-aluminum

If you read some of the reviews people comment on its ability to warm the tent a bit and remove moisture. This product is on my to get list. I plan on a couple more winter camping trips.

pepooch
01-12-2012, 06:08 PM
Hmmmm you can improvise a small camp stove with one of those big cofee cans and smaller bean cans as a chimney.

TopsBlades
01-13-2012, 12:14 AM
22+ years in the military saw a few cold nights. One of the things I learned was never to get toasty warm. Sweating is a definite no go. Dress in layers and peel layers off as you warm up. Instead of wearing a sweater I would wear three Thermax shirts. The first one might have been short sleeved, the next one would have been have been a large long sleeved model and the top one was an extra large. I still wear this set up while deer hunting.

Some of my other habits were:

Always sleep with a hat on. Usually a wool knit cap, now usually a fleece model.

A high fat, hot drink just before bed. A butter loaded cup of hot chocolate is the ticket. Peanut butter eaten with a cup of hot tea will work as well. Good fat that digests twice in your belly will keep the internal furnace burning.

I got in the habit of keeping a one burner propane stove next to the rack. I carried a thermos as a First Sergeant, one of those half gallon models and I kept it full of REAL drip coffee. At night I would fill it with boiling water. Just the act of boiling a pot of water warmed the tent. The boiling water went into the thermos. This had two benefits, first, it prewarmed the thermos and ensured that my coffee stayed hot the next day. Secondly I had the hot water for a shave and a wash in the morning.

When I woke I started the stove again under a pot of water for the drip coffee making for the day. After I started to hear the pot start to crack and pop I knew the water was getting close. I would get up and pour the thermos of hot water into a small basin and set a Merlita Coffee Filter holder on the neck of my thermos full of coffee and would start pouring the boiling water into it, filling my preheated thermos with beautiful hot coffee. Again the stove did yeoman's work heating the tent.

Sometimes I had problems with my feet getting cold. I learned to use the waterproof bag that carried my bag and put it over the feet end of my sleeping bag on the outside. Worked like a charm.

Always wear clean clothes, long johns whatever to sleep. I would sleep clean and then get up and put dirty clothes back on and pack up the clean stuff.

A 2 mantle Coleman lantern puts out a lot of heat. You can turn it down on low when you go to sleep.

Always take a pee bottle inside the bag at night. If you have to pee it is nice not to have to get out of your nice warm sleeping bag to do it. A liter Gatorade bottle works well. Wide mouth, smooth opening. Doesn't resemble my canteen in the slightest.

All that being said I recently bought one of the Mr. Buddy propane heaters. I plan on using it when I make my driving trip to visit my son in Alaska later this year. No matter what, however that old Coleman one burner stove will be making the trip as well.

Bad Hand
01-13-2012, 01:51 AM
In my tipi I just build a fire, in my mountain tent I just keep adding dogs.

dogboy
01-13-2012, 06:36 AM
In my tipi I just build a fire, in my mountain tent I just keep adding dogs.

I hope you meant "logs."

riverjoe
01-13-2012, 10:29 AM
I hope you meant "logs."
I think he means "three dog night " like the Austrailian shepherds .

RandallFlagg
01-13-2012, 03:52 PM
like everybody else said, good sleeping bag, sleeping pad, footprint, but also i always wear some type of cotton hat with a hooded sweatshirt over top of the hat for extra warmth.

i do the same. of course also thermal bloomers underneath.

RandallFlagg
01-13-2012, 03:57 PM
http://www.rei.com/product/637736/rei-candle-lantern-ready-kit-aluminum

If you read some of the reviews people comment on its ability to warm the tent a bit and remove moisture. This product is on my to get list. I plan on a couple more winter camping trips.

you can make those. over in the self made gear thread are hundreds of examples. I use a altoids can full of parafin waxed cotton balls. when i want to put out the fire i close the lid. i buy lots of altoid cans for this and other purposes.

dducey
01-13-2012, 08:05 PM
Should this be moved to the Winter Camping forum?

GeoKrpan
01-13-2012, 09:22 PM
Hmmmm you can improvise a small camp stove with one of those big cofee cans and smaller bean cans as a chimney.

Have you actually done this? Or, have you seen someone else do this?

If so, can you give us a better description of how to do it?
Photos would be great.

Gracias, amigo.

GeoKrpan
01-13-2012, 10:04 PM
22+ years in the military saw a few cold nights. One of the things I learned was never to get toasty warm. Sweating is a definite no go. Dress in layers and peel layers off as you warm up. Instead of wearing a sweater I would wear three Thermax shirts. The first one might have been short sleeved, the next one would have been have been a large long sleeved model and the top one was an extra large. I still wear this set up while deer hunting.

Some of my other habits were:

Always sleep with a hat on. Usually a wool knit cap, now usually a fleece model.

A high fat, hot drink just before bed. A butter loaded cup of hot chocolate is the ticket. Peanut butter eaten with a cup of hot tea will work as well. Good fat that digests twice in your belly will keep the internal furnace burning.

I got in the habit of keeping a one burner propane stove next to the rack. I carried a thermos as a First Sergeant, one of those half gallon models and I kept it full of REAL drip coffee. At night I would fill it with boiling water. Just the act of boiling a pot of water warmed the tent. The boiling water went into the thermos. This had two benefits, first, it prewarmed the thermos and ensured that my coffee stayed hot the next day. Secondly I had the hot water for a shave and a wash in the morning.

When I woke I started the stove again under a pot of water for the drip coffee making for the day. After I started to hear the pot start to crack and pop I knew the water was getting close. I would get up and pour the thermos of hot water into a small basin and set a Merlita Coffee Filter holder on the neck of my thermos full of coffee and would start pouring the boiling water into it, filling my preheated thermos with beautiful hot coffee. Again the stove did yeoman's work heating the tent.

Sometimes I had problems with my feet getting cold. I learned to use the waterproof bag that carried my bag and put it over the feet end of my sleeping bag on the outside. Worked like a charm.

Always wear clean clothes, long johns whatever to sleep. I would sleep clean and then get up and put dirty clothes back on and pack up the clean stuff.

A 2 mantle Coleman lantern puts out a lot of heat. You can turn it down on low when you go to sleep.

Always take a pee bottle inside the bag at night. If you have to pee it is nice not to have to get out of your nice warm sleeping bag to do it. A liter Gatorade bottle works well. Wide mouth, smooth opening. Doesn't resemble my canteen in the slightest.

All that being said I recently bought one of the Mr. Buddy propane heaters. I plan on using it when I make my driving trip to visit my son in Alaska later this year. No matter what, however that old Coleman one burner stove will be making the trip as well.

There's gotta' be a SAFE way to heat a tent with with a liquid or gas fueled appliance. One burner Coleman stoves, lanterns, and Buddy heaters are relatively safe as long as there is adequate ventilation but there is still a risk. Unlike a wood stove, which would fill your shelter with smoke if there was a problem, the poisons are invisible with a liquid or gas fueled appliance.
I have noticed how much heat a lantern puts out. If it were sealed and there was a chimney pipe, I think that could be a pretty good heater. If the top was flat you could also cook on it.
I was thinking of covering a backpacking stove with a large coffee can with a chimney pipe but there's no telling what would happen when the fuel reservoir get hot. Explosion? A sealed lantern is a better bet.
I was also thinking of BBQ briquettes in a small can covered with a larger can with a chimney pipe.

Nclonewolf
01-13-2012, 11:52 PM
A fat woman works great!

Rotflmfao!

atvgod82
01-14-2012, 06:43 AM
I use a Mr. Buddy large size heater with a 5ft hose to a 20lb. propane tank.

8thsinner
01-14-2012, 09:24 AM
If I was going back to my old tent which had the space.
I would stack up the hottest coals from the fire into my mess tin, whilst it's still burning so I can come back to it.

Lay a few sticks in the middle of the tent and lay the mess tin down.

Go back to the fire, until bed time. An hour at most. Take out the mess tin and the tent should be fairly warm, so long as you creep in quickly and smoothly.

Otherwise do this a few times replacing coals as needed. or if your secure in the idea. bring the coals into the tent. If you have space.

Otherwise the hot water bottle trick at your feet is usually fine enough.

I tried the candle (small piece of esbit tab really) idea with my tarp a few weeks ago, using a space blanket over the door with a crack for air and it was marvellously warm in moments.

GeoKrpan
01-14-2012, 12:19 PM
If I was going back to my old tent which had the space.
I would stack up the hottest coals from the fire into my mess tin, whilst it's still burning so I can come back to it.

Lay a few sticks in the middle of the tent and lay the mess tin down.

Go back to the fire, until bed time. An hour at most. Take out the mess tin and the tent should be fairly warm, so long as you creep in quickly and smoothly.

Otherwise do this a few times replacing coals as needed. or if your secure in the idea. bring the coals into the tent. If you have space.

Otherwise the hot water bottle trick at your feet is usually fine enough.

I tried the candle (small piece of esbit tab really) idea with my tarp a few weeks ago, using a space blanket over the door with a crack for air and it was marvellously warm in moments.

How did you have the tarp pitched?

8thsinner
01-14-2012, 03:48 PM
How did you have the tarp pitched?

Like this (http://www.bushcraftusa.com/forum/showthread.php?t=53318)

Squidders
01-14-2012, 06:16 PM
I have a coleman black cat for my smaller tent if it's just an overnight... for long term I'd sleep under a tarp and have a decent fire going.

riverjoe
01-14-2012, 07:37 PM
Last week in Michigan . One wall missing for photo op .

http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/winterbushcrafter2012/IMG_0760_2.jpg

thedougler
01-23-2012, 02:31 AM
i have used my uncoated stainless steel cooking pots in a pinch. place red hot sand or rocks in the largest pot place the lid (or some kind of safe cover) on in and place the full pot on top of your smaller pot turned upside down. it will give you a little heat for around 2 hours (give or take 30 mim). not the safest way but it works.

IndieroxNWusa
01-23-2012, 04:03 PM
Also a healthy well balanced diet will actually help your body stay as warm as possible.. keeping your metabolism and blood sugar regulated. I know when I am eating very clean, several smaller spaced meals a day, my body stays much warmer.

thebushmansdream
01-23-2012, 06:58 PM
I haven't tried this yet ,but I imagine hand warmers would work for a time to keep you warm.

quadancer
05-21-2012, 08:19 AM
I have not camped in REAL cold weather in ages, about 14F is the coldest I have seen in the past few years.
I have a good tent, a 4 season Eureka, and I use a cot, a thick foam pad, and blankets.
I remember to wear light gloves, and my wool cap. I am perfectly comfortable at temps well below freezing.

I'm the same - my High Peak will take the fly legs all the way to the ground in winter, and it's about 10 degrees or more warmer than outside just from body heat. Staking them out a little allows venting under the fly for spring and fall use.

http://i209.photobucket.com/albums/bb223/quadancer/BIKE/Runs/Prisonrun.jpg

Dishonor39
06-22-2012, 12:10 AM
Hmm, to stay warm in a tent I use a combination of North Face Re Meow 20 degree bag, a Sea to Summit silk liner, a Big Agnes Insulated Air Core, and if needed a Mountain Hardwear Phantom 45 bag on top of me if needed for more insulation. I am not sure if that is the question you are asking though, as far as heating the air inside the tent, I haven't needed to I guess. If even more warmth is needed while sleeping, I do the boiled water in a Nalgene bottle and that helps quite a bit for quite a while. If I had to stay warm in even colder conditions I would put some Reflectix underneath my Insulated Air Core.

quadancer
06-22-2012, 09:45 AM
I carry a ChinaMart (you know...the old WallyWorld...) fleece summer bag I haven't gotten to use yet. It seems that my permanently freezing WIFE has glommed onto it and uses it INSIDE her REI bag. She says it makes a ton of difference.
Dunno WHAT I'm gonna do next hot night, under my 20 degree BA bag...:20:

GrandLarsony
09-26-2012, 05:22 PM
This thread is a little old (sorry) but we're approaching fall\winter camping season once again and I though I'd share an idea that wasn't yet listed.

There are foot warmers and hand warmers, and most of us know about them and use them when they make sense. I personally like the old-school Zippo liquid fuel units, and also the solid fuel hand warmer units that fit into your pocket (no idea what brand, but I got one in the 80s and still have some fuel).

One other thing we found last year was a BACK WARMER-- same technology as the foot\had warmers but with a very light cotton\velcro belt. The heating area is at least 6+ hand warmers in size (my guess) and it heats your blood as it passes through your kidneys (or in my case, kidney). You can find them in drug stores for about $4-5 each.

They heat your whole body for up to 8 hours. We've used these for camping and also for skiing in really frigid weather with great results.

Crazysanman
09-26-2012, 05:37 PM
A heavy sleeping bag.

riverjoe
09-26-2012, 06:52 PM
The Rakovalkea all night fire .
So we cooked a light supper and settled in for the evening . Expecting a low of 35 degrees Fahrenheit .

http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/hollerfire/gettingstarted.jpg

quadancer
09-26-2012, 07:12 PM
YO DAWG...uh, I'm no "expurt", but I believe the backwall of logs is supposed to be on the OTHER side of the fire to reflect
radiant heat TOWARDS the lean-to??? LOL! Hope you didn't freeze that night!
Are the burning leaves outside the fire gonna wake you up at 1am when they reach the tarp?
Inquiring minds wanna know...

riverjoe
09-26-2012, 07:49 PM
YO DAWG...uh, I'm no "expurt", but I believe the backwall of logs is supposed to be on the OTHER side of the fire to reflect
radiant heat TOWARDS the lean-to??? LOL! Hope you didn't freeze that night!
Are the burning leaves outside the fire gonna wake you up at 1am when they reach the tarp?
Inquiring minds wanna know...

If you google rakovalkea fire you will see some other pics . The fire burns between the gap of the logs thus burning slowly and steadily all night . This is commonly used in Scandinavia where there are lots of experts . Although a lot of leaves are visible in the pics I actually raked the area between me and the fire . I slept comfortably but it only got to 35 degrees .

HorseSoldier
09-26-2012, 07:54 PM
One other thing we found last year was a BACK WARMER-- same technology as the foot\had warmers but with a very light cotton\velcro belt. The heating area is at least 6+ hand warmers in size (my guess) and it heats your blood as it passes through your kidneys (or in my case, kidney). You can find them in drug stores for about $4-5 each.

They heat your whole body for up to 8 hours. We've used these for camping and also for skiing in really frigid weather with great results.

That is a great idea that I never even thought of. I'm not bothered much by cold but my wife is (so much so that even summer camping up here in AK is a two sleeping bag deal for her). Those back warmer pads may be just the thing for her.

quadancer
09-26-2012, 09:09 PM
If you google rakovalkea fire you will see some other pics . The fire burns between the gap of the logs thus burning slowly and steadily all night . This is commonly used in Scandinavia where there are lots of experts . .

Learn every day...all the hits had the same blog post as Wiki, but I get the idea...sorta. I'd like to know what the advantages are over using a slanted stack of backlogs (that arent' to burn until later) with a forward fire. This is new to me, and I like to know stuff.

1911srule
09-26-2012, 09:24 PM
Campbells beans of course! Coleman lantern works fine. If its really cold , instant heat packs or handwarmer in bottom of sleeping bag.

ineffableone
09-27-2012, 01:20 AM
As has been mentioned a few times in this thread, with a typical back pack tent (synthetic materials) havng anything burning is sort of a bad idea. If you do then make sure it is well away from anything it can burn and on some sort of stable platform. Candles, can help but make sure they are in some sort of container, a candle lantern etc. I don't think I saw anyone mention the option of an old fashioned oil lamp, but those can put out some decent heat also. One thing to consider if your camping in a regular tent in the winter is to bring some insulation. That bubble wrap stuff with reflective coating one side can be added to sections of a tent to give it a better insulation, and thus hold more heat inside.

If considering a wood stove, then make sure you are using a canvas tent with flame retardant coating or if it is a synthetic tent it is properly coated with a flame retardant and made to be used with a wood stove. Then make sure you have a good reflector/heat shield against the wall behind your stove and proper flashing chimney hole.

Hot tents are great but tend to be a lot heavier and made of canvas, as it makes a much better durable tent for use with fire.

The other helpful suggestions of hot water bottle, hot ricks, hand warmers, etc are all good tricks for dealing with a cold tent.

One big thing I don't remember seeing is the need for a proper winter tent. Most tents are not made to take a snow load. So if your going to camp in the winter, you want to make sure your tent canvas or synthetic needs to be able to take a snow load. Last thing you want to to wake up with your tent collapsed all around you, possibly bending your poles or even ripping your tent open. Most tents are 3 season, so you need to look for either a 4 season or winter specific tent. Remember these will be heavier than a 3 season tent. They will also tend to be bulkier. Another problem with winter tents tends to be condensation. When you get them warmed up they can become quite humid inside, and then when they cool down get ice on the interior. So keep an eye on the amount of wet stuff you bring into your tent, and don't boil water inside your tent unless absolutely necessary. Once your tent gets filled with humidity it is really hard to get rid of.

riverjoe
09-27-2012, 06:36 AM
Learn every day...all the hits had the same blog post as Wiki, but I get the idea...sorta. I'd like to know what the advantages are over using a slanted stack of backlogs (that arent' to burn until later) with a forward fire. This is new to me, and I like to know stuff.

As you probabley know a campfire is a wonder of inefficiency . Much of the fuel in the form of combustable gasses go up the column of heated air unburned .
When I did the Red Cedar rakovalkea I observed a fascinating phenomina . As little gusts of wind would blow the red hot embers on the bottom of the top log and the top of the bottom log would produce a flame much like a gas burner this being the combustable gas . This went on all night as the embers crept down the length of the log . When I did another fire with hardwood it didn't work so well . Pine is the ideal wood aparently but its hard to come by around here .

JC1
09-27-2012, 06:46 AM
I didnt read every post in this thread so I will add my .02 just in case it hasn't been mentioned.

Never burn in a closed tent. An open flame (lantern, propane, candle, etc...) will suck the oxygen out of your tent and leave you dead.

bourbon&bisquits
09-27-2012, 04:53 PM
Never burn in a closed tent. An open flame (lantern, propane, candle, etc...) will suck the oxygen out of your tent and leave you dead.


^ i realize 'better safe than sorry'---but this might be a little overly apprehensive thinking about the air thing......i dont know of any tents that are airtight enough to make this a reality-----not aware of any people ever dying of asphyxiation while in a kifaru tipi/tent burning a stove for days and nights on end

anyway----i use a zero degree down bag to stay warm in a winter tent-----to heat it more-----just add more bodies

JC1
09-27-2012, 07:56 PM
^ i realize 'better safe than sorry'---but this might be a little overly apprehensive thinking about the air thing......i dont know of any tents that are airtight enough to make this a reality-----not aware of any people ever dying of asphyxiation while in a kifaru tipi/tent burning a stove for days and nights on end

anyway----i use a zero degree down bag to stay warm in a winter tent-----to heat it more-----just add more bodies


Your right BUT I have a been affected twice, here are the short versions of the story's.

Six of us elk hunting, rain storm blows in and soaks all of us while the wind takes down one of the smaller tents and the temps drop into the 40's. We all go into the wall tent with the wood stove cranked up, all the lanterns and a couple of propane portable heaters to get warm and dry our cloths. After a few minutes we all had headaches and got dizzy. Realizing what was going on we quickly turned off the propane heaters, turned the lanterns on low and opened the two windows and door.

One time the flu on the wood stove made its way shut in the night and we woke up to a tent full of smoke. The smoke was less than a foot off the ground, if we had been in cots we my not have survived.

Tents trap enough moisture to cause condensation, they can surly slow down the transfer of fresh air, I'm just saying be careful

Chazzle
09-27-2012, 08:00 PM
I hang one of those Uco Candle Lanterns up in the tent before I go to bed. The candle warms up the tent a little, and get some of the humidity out. When camping in the winter, I try to get myself off the ground, or place insulation between me and the cold earth. The ground will suck all the warmth out of ya! A warm sleeping bag and an old comforter quilt does the trick. A warm Siberian husky/ German sheperd mix curled up next to me wouldn't hurt either! :D

dducey
09-27-2012, 08:01 PM
An axiom that I believe due to experience is 'Fires don't keep you warm, dressing for the weather keeps you warm'. Proper clothing and sleeping gear allows you to be out in winter and to enjoy the experience. It takes some study and experimenting to determine what is right for you.

bourbon&bisquits
09-28-2012, 01:35 PM
JC1: i might suspect the dizziness was caused by unburned (incomplete combustion---leaking connections--) propane and lantern fuel {the main reason i prefer not to use kero or propane heater 'indoors'......only wood} --- *As opposed to all the O2 getting used up

you caught it in time and thats what really counts

Jin
09-28-2012, 08:56 PM
Best way if you have plenty of actual sleeping bags and insulation under you...eat before you go to bed...it will warm you.

Then if you wake up cold, activate 1 or 2 glove warmers in your bag. Good to go. You could use a hot water canteen but they get colder faster I think.

RedMan
09-28-2012, 09:03 PM
get a good sleeping bag. Either a 0 degree or a 32 degree sleeping bag and before you go to bed boil some water and put it into a nalgene at the bottom of your sleeping bag. It will keep you more than hot enough throughout the night. I go winter camping up at 8,500 feet with 60 mile an hour winds and sometimes higher wind and altitude with a two season tent. I use this method with a 0 bag and I am toasty all night. Sometimes if it is really cold you need to bundle up before getting into your bag, but you do not want to sweat. Try to guess the amount of clothing you will need to be the perfect temperature. After a while you will get the hang of it. This approach also works with snow trenches which can get really warm if you use a space blanket with the reflective side facing in for the roof. Good Luck!

go2ndamend
09-28-2012, 09:09 PM
What I did last fall worked pretty well. I was camping in Wyoming in October at around 6500 feet while elk hunting. There was a large blown down spruce tree that was green. I dug a hole, down a about 6 inches, the same size as the floor of my backpacking tent. Then I made a spruce bed out of the boughs and covered that with a tarp. Then I erected my tent over that. It was quite a bit warmer than I normally camp in my tent due to the cold ground not being in direct contact with the floor of the tent. The spruce boughs provided an amazing amount of insulation. I also have a very warm -20 degree bag and an exped down-air mat which help a lot, but without that set-up I sleep cold.

riverjoe
09-28-2012, 09:16 PM
This thread is so old I can't remember if I posted this cutaway view of my old Baker tent or not .
http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/winterbushcrafter2012/IMG_0760_2.jpg

quadancer
09-28-2012, 10:32 PM
Heheheh...you all have that "now wadda we do?" look!
Your double wall makes me think a tarp thrown over a tent fly might make for a warmer night.

ppine
09-30-2012, 03:28 PM
For camping with trucks, boats, or a packstring, a canvas tent with a wood stove. For backpacking a Whelen lean-to with a fire in front.

I ran a tree planting crew in Arizona at 7,300 feet for a month. Every time it snowed my wall tent was the popular place to be in camp with 30 people, later dubbed the "Flagstaff Hilton."

Packed some elk hunters in Colorado once at 10,900 feet in late October for 10 days. It was often below zero at night and having a wall tent with a stove made all the difference. It is a place to dry out the clothes and bedding and warm up after hunting all day.

I have tried the lean-to on winter overnight ski trips in the Sierra. I use a dog to pull a light sled or pulk. The three sided Whelen works surprisingly well even at zero degrees. It is pure luxury to sit by a fire and dry out the ski boots and socks. It is the cure for the 14 hours of darkness in winter, sitting by a fire and looking out at the woods.

mountain joe
09-30-2012, 04:54 PM
Heheheh...you all have that "now wadda we do?" look!
Your double wall makes me think a tarp thrown over a tent fly might make for a warmer night.

Oh I think we were all just kind of enjoying the quiet and warmth after the snowmachine trip in and camp setup. We were kind of winding down just before crawling into the sleeping bags. Yes I do believe you are right about a tarp over the tent. I know with the tent in the first picture, it would be plenty warm between me and the stove but between me and the wall I could feel the cold. When I switched to the double wall design it was warm throughout the tent. The double cover thickness made a big noticable difference in temperature retention.

zippy
09-30-2012, 05:24 PM
my two dogs and a good sleeping bag

riverjoe
09-30-2012, 06:17 PM
For camping with trucks, boats, or a packstring, a canvas tent with a wood stove. For backpacking a Whelen lean-to with a fire in front.

I ran a tree planting crew in Arizona at 7,300 feet for a month. Every time it snowed my wall tent was the popular place to be in camp with 30 people, later dubbed the "Flagstaff Hilton."

Packed some elk hunters in Colorado once at 10,900 feet in late October for 10 days. It was often below zero at night and having a wall tent with a stove made all the difference. It is a place to dry out the clothes and bedding and warm up after hunting all day.

I have tried the lean-to on winter overnight ski trips in the Sierra. I use a dog to pull a light sled or pulk. The three sided Whelen works surprisingly well even at zero degrees. It is pure luxury to sit by a fire and dry out the ski boots and socks. It is the cure for the 14 hours of darkness in winter, sitting by a fire and looking out at the woods.

Just for my edification piney . How close to the fire do you sleep in that Whelen syle tent . I'm thinking you should be within about 3 feet of a slow burning long fire . I also think a wool blanket or in my case an ankle length wool coat between me and the fire . This should prevent any embers burning throught the sleeping bag before I wake up .What do you do ?

ppine
09-30-2012, 11:44 PM
Joe,
I like to sleep against the back wall, which places my sl bag about 5-6 feet from the fire. If there is another person they may be as close as 3 feet to the fire. It is an advantage to have canvas or wool over a sleeping bag. I have a few burn holes in my outfit from using fires a lot. Most of the holes are small and can be patched or filled with rubber cement.

Xtrekker
10-03-2012, 07:29 AM
Am I in the right place? This is a backpacking thread right?

I mean some of these options are great but are horrible ideas for backpacking. I mean how would you carry those huge tents and stoves on a backpacking trip?

riverjoe
10-03-2012, 08:12 AM
Am I in the right place? This is a backpacking thread right?

I mean some of these options are great but are horrible ideas for backpacking. I mean how would you carry those huge tents and stoves on a backpacking trip?

Sheesh a back packer can't pull a little toboggan along .

We test the insulated bakers tent with wood burner .
First carry out the tent proper with a 106 pound tobbogan .
Wanted more snow but running out of time before the camp out .
Does not tow too bad even on frozen leaves . Mud would be a pain though .


http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/winter2012/IMG_0708.jpg

Built an extra throw away tobbogan for the insulation . Lots of volume not much weight . 32 pounds with shovel . Assemble optional poles . These are necessary if on state land or no saplings available .

http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/winter2012/th_IMG_0712.jpg (http://s944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/winter2012/?action=view&current=IMG_0712.jpg)

Late start in the afternoon . Ready at my command ...... camp

http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/winter2012/th_IMG_0714.jpg (http://s944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/winter2012/?action=view&current=IMG_0714.jpg)

http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/winter2012/th_IMG_0715.jpg (http://s944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/winter2012/?action=view&current=IMG_0715.jpg)

Lay out the tarp and then feed through the main insulation .

http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/winter2012/th_IMG_0719.jpg (http://s944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/winter2012/?action=view&current=IMG_0719.jpg)

Making progress but dark is fast approaching .

http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/winter2012/th_IMG_0720.jpg (http://s944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/winter2012/?action=view&current=IMG_0720.jpg)

Lay out the wood burner for assembly .

http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/winter2012/th_IMG_0724.jpg (http://s944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/winter2012/?action=view&current=IMG_0724.jpg)

Gathered sticks and small test person to check for warmth .

http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/winter2012/th_IMG_0728.jpg (http://s944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/winter2012/?action=view&current=IMG_0728.jpg)

All in all about 3 to 4 hours to fire in the hearth .

http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/winter2012/IMG_0731.jpg

bodhran4me
10-03-2012, 08:35 AM
Bring a pee bottle !!!!

You don't have to get up out of your bag/blankets, get dressed, shoes etc, get chilled, covered in snow (or worse cold rain :eek:) , undress and clamber back into your cold blankets. Make sure your pee bottle is a different shape than your water bottle so that cold numb fingers can still the difference, even in the dark. Obviously it should have an easy to open lid that still seals well. :45:

ppine
10-03-2012, 10:42 AM
Trekker,
There are now tiny sheet metal stoves designed for backpacking. Tent designs originally made in canvas now come in nylon and sil materials. For traveling on snow it is easy to pull a small sled or hitch one to a dog. Until you have the experience of heating a tent or lean-to with fire you don't know what you are missing.

Silverlion
10-06-2012, 02:57 PM
When I used to tent camp(hammock hanger now), I used a Coleman catalytic heater with quite a bit of success. They're designed to be used inside. Even though the tent is somewhat ventilated, I would leave a little crack in the window(per manufacturer's instructions) and never had any issues. My hammock and sleeping bag keep me plenty warm nowadays and give me a better night's sleep versus on the ground.

quadancer
10-06-2012, 03:36 PM
Good to know: I just got an old one from Fleabay. Gotta try it out tonight in the shop. I figured propane is just too
expensive and bulky.

Ned
10-06-2012, 03:54 PM
When I used to tent camp(hammock hanger now), I used a Coleman catalytic heater with quite a bit of success. They're designed to be used inside. Even though the tent is somewhat ventilated, I would leave a little crack in the window(per manufacturer's instructions) and never had any issues.

I used to use one of those! That'll keep you toasty warm... I was actually going to mention it, but I couldn't remember the name "catalytic heater" and figured nobody makes those anymore anyways. I used one of those for some of my 6 years of straight tent living. Never had a problem with it, though I don't remember whatever became of my catalytic heater... got lost somewhere in my travels.

I would suggest you only use it on very flat ground of course. :) Maybe even build a rock ring or something around it to ensure it doesn't get knocked over by mistake. Just in case, though as I said I've never had any incidents with mine. It's a pretty stable unit.

PS, the type I used to have used gas, and I had a multi-fuel stove as well so I could share gas for them. Back in the day you could use regular unleaded gasoline before they started jacking up the ethanol content. A quick Google search turned up a Coleman catalytic heater which runs off a propane cylinder. Don't know how it works, but I'm sure it'd be fine (except for the fact that you're relying on propane for cold weather camping - a little backwards if you ask me, lol).

bushcrafbasics
10-27-2012, 02:36 PM
you can heat your tent with a candle-lantern, but obviously you gotta be careful...

Sgt. Mac
10-27-2012, 02:48 PM
With my dog lol

sligerm80
11-22-2012, 12:43 PM
I use the Primus EasyLight lantern in the mornings when it's really cold but you do have to be extremely careful. Throughout the night though, I'd get a pad with extra insulation made for cold weather and a 20 or 0 sleeping bag with plenty of base layer.

kyak
11-22-2012, 01:10 PM
I agree with Jason!

Lamewolf
12-10-2012, 09:05 AM
Don't use a tent, use a teepee. If its built right, you can build a small fire on the ground in the center of the teepee and be toasty warm.

tdomer
12-11-2012, 07:05 AM
Just plain good warm gear. Matt.down sleeping bag thermals. wool sox and hat. MAke sure you eat healthy before going to bed so your body has energy to produce heat.

PMSteve
12-11-2012, 12:29 PM
I just build a campfire inside my tent. Only did it once. Not the best choice. :15:

http://i1215.photobucket.com/albums/cc501/pmsteve/firetent.jpg

Steve

quadancer
12-11-2012, 02:08 PM
Hey, burning tents put out a lot of heat! ...or so I hear...

YTSESoldier
12-11-2012, 10:44 PM
with a can of beans....

PMSteve
12-11-2012, 11:13 PM
Hey, burning tents put out a lot of heat! ...or so I hear...


with a can of beans....

Found the picture on Google and I HAD to post it! :4:

Natures_Adventure
12-12-2012, 12:24 AM
Well, as an avid camper in the great white north here in Canada, I have a three season tent made by mountain hardwear but has a really good fly that I pack snow around to seal it off. I use a coleman tent heater that takes a propane tank, one of those small tanks. I turn it on when I get in the tent, by the time i'm out of my clothes and in the bag it's roasty toasty. Turn off the heater and reverse it. Light it up before you get out of the bag, warms up fast.

8thsinner
12-12-2012, 08:13 AM
For winter i go with a basha, domed and sealed with thermal blanket and a tea light. Tea light lantern can be used too if your worried about heat directly building up over the flame. Also the lantern catches soot. Heats a small space like this in aboot two minutes.

kyak
12-17-2012, 02:39 PM
Heat up a good dry rock by the fire and place it in a cook pot in your tent and you got radiant heat for awhile! Never tried it but I heard of people using that idea......

SurviveBaker
12-17-2012, 03:46 PM
A neat little trick that i've used with my tarp, is a Dakota fire pit with the smoke and air hole dug outside the tarp, and the actual fire pit side dug down a good 8 inches deeper than the smoke hole, with the tunnel between angled upwards to help with the draw.
It's best to dig the pit and build the fire and get a really good bed of coals before putting up the tarp. Then you can get through the night quite well, with maybe laying one small green log on from time to time and letting it smolder on the coals.
I have'nt read all the replies here, so i hope this is'nt repetitive, and that it might help.

Tactical Retreat
12-17-2012, 08:42 PM
For heat, hard to beat a big dog and a small tent, he he. Of course when he starts dreaming and kicks you in the ribs you start to wonder if it's really worth it.

kyak
12-17-2012, 11:21 PM
Always eat right before you hit the sack...you'll be much warmer and NEVER ever hold your pee in, you'll just get colder...guaranteed!!!