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Dux
10-09-2011, 08:53 PM
Having read (sure think it was here) earlier this year about keeping eggs without refrigeration, i did some research and started doing so. I've been taking eggs bought from a grocery store and putting them in a ziploc with enough canola oil to give em a good coating. I keep the ziploc in a lil lunch cooler, mostly to protect it from being crushed, but also seems like a good idea to minimize extremes of temperature. So far up to six weeks and no ill effects.

g8rgar
10-09-2011, 08:58 PM
I get my eggs from my dad and put them in the fridge not sure how long they would last that way I ve got to try this. What does the oil do?

Seeker
10-09-2011, 08:59 PM
the oil acts as a sealant, preventing lost of moisture FROM the egg, and prevents things from getting INTO the egg... something like that anyway...

jasonhcc
10-09-2011, 09:03 PM
Interesting topic.

Are you doing this to see how long they will last if you were to take em into the field or some other reason?

I love taking eggs camping and they seem to do fine without being kept cold forma couple days but I haven't tried longer.

GreyOne
10-09-2011, 09:50 PM
Boaters used to use "waterglass" silica solution to do the same thing, for extended trips.

LukeDeBee
10-09-2011, 10:13 PM
Boaters used to use "waterglass" silica solution to do the same thing, for extended trips.

Some time ago I researched this subject to learn how farmers and homesteaders did this. Here is what I learned: This works best with fresh eggs. What I mean is eggs taken from under the chicken and before they are refrigerated. Coat them / paint them with waterglass. Then store them in egg cartons, or sraw leaving them undisurbed at a stable room temperature. Old farmers used to place the coated eggs in root cellars or in dumbwaiters. Eggs treated this way often lasted for months.

Waterglass can also be used as an adhesive. I found some at a hardware store I used the waterglass to reline an old steamer truck with a new cloth liner. The waterglass was a thick clear liquid. When it dried the fabric stuck to the inside of the trunk like it had been epoxied.

Luke DeBee

wyatt
10-09-2011, 10:39 PM
Grand Maw used to mix 20 Mule Team Borax with lard and cover the eggs with the mixture in layers in a Crock. I remember the eggs lasted a long time. Several months at least.

barnes3126
10-09-2011, 10:58 PM
Found this on the net.
Chinese eat thousand-year old eggs. They are not really a thousand years old. They are made by preserving duck eggs in ash and salt for one-hundred days. This turns the white of the egg a darkish gray color, giving the eggs an ancient appearance. Definitely an acquired taste, thousand-year old eggs have a strong salty flavor.

TheNihilist
10-10-2011, 04:07 AM
Eggs are sold without refrigeration here, they usually have 3 weeks best before from the shops getting them and having to sell them.

However we most folk i know keep eggs for at least 2 weeks after there best before date without refrigeration and they don't seem to deteriorate at all.

Eggs from your own hens are different from shop bought eggs though.

randyt
10-10-2011, 05:45 AM
here's a can of waterglass that was used for sealing the end of reloaded shotgun shells. Several years ago I acquired a 16 ga and my father fixed me up with the equipment for reloading the 16 ga.

http://i257.photobucket.com/albums/hh227/randytlee/016-1.jpg

ElectriCains
10-10-2011, 07:48 AM
You can see if an egg is still good by submerging it in water. If it floats it is no good.

Sent from my DROIDX

santaman2000
10-10-2011, 08:22 AM
Some time ago I researched this subject to learn how farmers and homesteaders did this...

I gotta ask; why would a farmer or homesteader care? I grew up in the country and near my grandmother's farm. She and all the other farmers just gathered the eggs and kept them in a basket or bowl on the counter-top without any refrigeration. They were eaten within a few days of being laid. Most small farms (there/then) rarely had more than 6-10 eggs laid per day anyway.

I wouldn't trust them for more that a couple of weeks but so what? After all, it IS a FARM. The hens are a permanent part of the farm and they're gonna lay more eggs tomorrow.

santaman2000
10-10-2011, 08:32 AM
Eggs are sold without refrigeration here, they usually have 3 weeks best before from the shops getting them and having to sell them.

However we most folk i know keep eggs for at least 2 weeks after there best before date without refrigeration and they don't seem to deteriorate at all...

As I remember, most of Europe does it this way also. Eggs really don't need refrigeration for less than a few weeks; and after that they really aren't fit to eat no matter what you do to them. They may be safe to eat (but that ain't the same thing)

Tomm Swift
10-10-2011, 08:48 AM
If you get eggs straight from the chicken coop, they'll keep for six weeks without refrigeration. As long as you don't wash them until you're ready to use them. When washed the protective coating is lost and this is why store bought eggs should be coated or just kept refrigerated.

br79
10-10-2011, 08:55 AM
If you get eggs straight from the chicken coop, they'll keep for six weeks without refrigeration. As long as you don't wash them until you're ready to use them. When washed the protective coating is lost and this is why store bought eggs should be coated or just kept refrigerated.

This ^ exactly. This is also why hardcooked eggs wont last long at room temp, you have removed the natural protection nature puts on the egg shell.

thesilence
10-10-2011, 10:54 AM
I spent the summer in Costa Rica working with a mission organization, we had a bunch of chickens and a few turkeys. We never refrigerated the eggs or coated them and they kept for several weeks and they tasted better than any eggs we get here in the States. Fresh from the hen eggs have a natural protective coating on them. Also, none of the stores refrigerated eggs.

Ahnkochee
10-10-2011, 01:54 PM
Okay, why is there no such thing as half an egg?


Because the egg always comes out of the hen's butt whole. :18:

1Jesster
10-10-2011, 02:04 PM
Okay, why is there no such thing as half an egg?


Because the egg always comes out of the hen's butt whole. :18:

Your a twissted man.........I like that about you

zippy
10-10-2011, 02:07 PM
old link
http://bushcraftusa.com/forum/showthread.php?t=8902&page=12

Illini Warrior
10-10-2011, 04:44 PM
experts recommend a water glass solution and something like a crock or the modern version, like a pop cooler, to store fresh eggs ...... storing in a dark cool basement or root cellar can keep eggs for a year ......

OregonDave
10-10-2011, 06:18 PM
Very interesting thread.
:33:
OD

santaman2000
10-10-2011, 06:24 PM
This ^ exactly. This is also why hardcooked eggs wont last long at room temp, you have removed the natural protection nature puts on the egg shell.

When I was a kid it took us days to eat all our Easter eggs (obviously hard boiled) Never refrigerated them and never had any problems.

For that matter, we never refrigerated mayonnaise back then either though; despite all the FDA warnings now-a-days.

santaman2000
10-10-2011, 06:26 PM
Okay, why is there no such thing as half an egg?


Because the egg always comes out of the hen's butt whole. :18:

But IIRC one of the fast food companies came up with a "square egg" a few years ago. LOL.

mischief
10-10-2011, 06:45 PM
experts recommend a water glass solution and something like a crock or the modern version, like a pop cooler, to store fresh eggs ...... storing in a dark cool basement or root cellar can keep eggs for a year ......

Please define "expert" and is that a EGG expert?
Note, I'm not trying to pick a fight or start anything evil, just want specifics as to the statement experts

woodsmith
10-10-2011, 07:42 PM
I gotta ask; why would a farmer or homesteader care? I grew up in the country and near my grandmother's farm. She and all the other farmers just gathered the eggs and kept them in a basket or bowl on the counter-top without any refrigeration. They were eaten within a few days of being laid. Most small farms (there/then) rarely had more than 6-10 eggs laid per day anyway.

I wouldn't trust them for more that a couple of weeks but so what? After all, it IS a FARM. The hens are a permanent part of the farm and they're gonna lay more eggs tomorrow.

Just a guess, but brooding hens don't lay. So if you've got a small flock there might have been times when you'd want to lay in a store of eggs before you let Mr. Rooster visit the girls.

santaman2000
10-10-2011, 09:01 PM
Just a guess, but brooding hens don't lay. So if you've got a small flock there might have been times when you'd want to lay in a store of eggs before you let Mr. Rooster visit the girls.

Maybe. I don't really know for sure. Just what I remember from my childhood. As best I remember though the brooding hens were kept separate from the laying hens.

I do remember for certain that they never "stored" eggs. I remember occasionally getting pickled eggs though.

Malamute
10-10-2011, 09:55 PM
I read on another forum that they experimented with various old time ways of keeping eggs, and did refrigerated and room temp. Even room temp were ok for a couple months.

I think I found it,

http://www.motherearthnews.com/Sustainable-Farming/1977-11-01/Fresh-Eggs.aspx

Ahnkochee
10-10-2011, 11:57 PM
But IIRC one of the fast food companies came up with a "square egg" a few years ago. LOL.

Several years ago we used to have a square egg mold. You insert a just boiled hot egg in the mold and press down then let cool several seconds to retain the shape. I guess they're still available. ;)
http://www.amazon.com/Egg-Cuber-Square-Press/dp/B002C8ZDQE
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51NEw-tY2jL.jpghttp://www.slipperybrick.com/wp-content/uploads/2006/12/egg-cuber.jpg

harvey_birdman
10-11-2011, 03:22 AM
Please define "expert" and is that a EGG expert?
Note, I'm not trying to pick a fight or start anything evil, just want specifics as to the statement experts

Maybe they were eggsperts:39::39:! LOL!

Sorry I just couldn't resist.:16:

WestrnBushcrft
10-11-2011, 03:33 AM
Sounds interesting never tried it my self...

Kona1
10-11-2011, 05:30 AM
I have read of sailors coating their eggs with vaseline to preserve them on voyages.

Illini Warrior
10-11-2011, 07:40 AM
Please define "expert" and is that a EGG expert?
Note, I'm not trying to pick a fight or start anything evil, just want specifics as to the statement experts


I've been somewhat associated with the food packaging industry for 30+ years ..... I only accept FDA backed research findings from a PHd food guru .....

don't ever accept, at face value, the absolute crap posted by some of these food/frugal blog sites ...... good many are just re-posting "old wive's tales" and food site rumours

santaman2000
10-11-2011, 09:28 AM
I've been somewhat associated with the food packaging industry for 30+ years ..... I only accept FDA backed research findings from a PHd food guru .....


LOL. And only half of them!

Old Philosopher
10-11-2011, 10:38 AM
old link
http://bushcraftusa.com/forum/showthread.php?t=8902&page=12
Washed and refrigerated, my hen's eggs are good for 6 months without any treatment. The easiest coating for fresh eggs is mineral oil. Cheap and available. It can extend their refrigeration time another 6 weeks.

Don't bother with store-bought eggs, since they are washed and re-coated at the processing plant. Most are several months old before you ever see them in the store.

I did a thread on making your own powdered eggs. I'm too lazy to find the link right now, but that's another way to preserve eggs for cooking and scrambling indefinitely.

The old myth of "floating eggs are bad" is just that, a myth. As the egg ages, internal gases fill the natural void in the egg. The more gas that's produced, the more buoyant the egg when floated in water. But just because an egg floats slightly doesn't mean it's bad.
I experimented with some 6-7 month old eggs, and cooked both the floaters, and the sinkers. Out of a dozen "floaters", only 2 were slightly cloudy. None were spoiled.
The best practice is to break an egg into a small bowl before adding it to a recipe/pan. That way you can check for cloudiness, or a green tinge to the albumin. If it's discolored, pitch it!

mischief
10-11-2011, 04:57 PM
I've been somewhat associated with the food packaging industry for 30+ years ..... I only accept FDA backed research findings from a PHd food guru .....

don't ever accept, at face value, the absolute crap posted by some of these food/frugal blog sites ...... good many are just re-posting "old wive's tales" and food site rumours

Would you please share those research findings with us. The reason I ask, I have never had a problem with storing fresh eggs when out and about in sand,swamp and muck.

What I do is break the shell and pore the entire egg (three large eggs) into a tall and small diameter, empty, washed olive bottle. I normally take two such containers of eggs and have 2 FRESH eggs for 3 morning eats. Each individual egg comes out of the container complete,ready for the pan.When out for more then 3 days I resort to hard shelled boil eggs after the fresh eggs are consumed(only because I have only 2 such containers now) ,and I might add with bacon.

Old Philosopher
10-11-2011, 05:59 PM
In my humble opinion, the folks who publish the FDA food handling "warnings" are the same ones who put the "Do Not Take by Mouth" warnings on Preparation H. :rolleyes:

Not to mention the "Caution! Flammable!" label on Ronson lighter fluid. :p

If you believe the FDA, all natural foods are just waiting to kill you. Be safe and only use synthetically derived pharmaceuticals, and GAO veggies! <he said, sarcastically>

santaman2000
10-11-2011, 06:30 PM
...If you believe the FDA, all natural foods are just waiting to kill you. Be safe and only use synthetically derived pharmaceuticals, and GAO veggies! <he said, sarcastically>

You may be right about the FDA; not really sure. I do remember 10 or 15 years ago though when it was an up and coming fad to eat "natural" foods cause they were supposedly healthier. I succumbed to the trend for a while myself until I started reading the obituaries; that's when I discovered that most people die of "natural" causes! That convinced me; only Spam and Ramen from now on! :9:

KCD1974
10-16-2011, 11:11 PM
The last time I went camping, store bought eggs, I just coated them in crisco and put them in a plastic camping egg holder and they were fine. I got the tip from a fellow camper that heads to the BWCA for long canoe trips.

Old Philosopher
10-17-2011, 12:05 AM
The last time I went camping, store bought eggs, I just coated them in crisco and put them in a plastic camping egg holder and they were fine. I got the tip from a fellow camper that heads to the BWCA for long canoe trips.
Any coating that blocks the pores in the shell will prolong their shelf life.
I found out the hard way that keeping fresh eggs in a "frost-free" refrigerator is a bad thing. Even in the main part of the 'fridge, the humidity is drastically reduced. The eggs actually started to dehydrate in the shell! The storage time, compared to an old style 'fridge was reduced by about a month!
These were un-coated eggs, but I'm thinking coating them with oil would have prevented the dehydration.

Edz
10-23-2011, 09:51 PM
Eggs can keep for weeks or even months without refrigeration and without any coating at all. They merely need to be turned once a day. They have very little air in them and if turned the whites continually re-coat and protect the shell from the inside and protect the egg from spoiling and from outside harm. In the old days they often kept eggs in wooden boxes stored in removable shelves. they could be slid out , turned over and slid back in. They did this for transport as well. The fresher the better (store bought eggs can be as much as 6-8 weeks old before they get to your fridge).
So packing eggs for camping trips is easy as they are constantly being turned as you hike. Just keep em from getting cracked and making a mess.

edz

Old Philosopher
10-23-2011, 11:19 PM
Eggs can keep for weeks or even months without refrigeration and without any coating at all. They merely need to be turned once a day. ...
I don't know about months, but another way to look at is that it takes 21 days for a hen to hatch her eggs. They are sitting in a 90F environment most of that time. After 24 days, it was either fertile, and hatched, or not. If it didn't hatch, it's still edible.
So...don't worry about fresh eggs, unless you're going to wait a month in the bush to eat them. ;)