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View Full Version : Wild Edibles that won't gag a maggot .



riverjoe
04-29-2012, 02:56 PM
Each week if possible or more often if I can but usually less often I've been trying to identify and eat a new wild edible . To me this skill more then any other marks a true bushman . By this I mean flora and fauna . Eventually I want to work my way up to insects but thats down the road a ways .
Of course Dandelions but they can be exceedingly bitter after spring . Recently found and identifyed Winter Cress . Same thing bitter bitter .
The vine Greenbrier not bad at all but not real common .
Garlic mustard bitter after the flowers form .
So most stuff bitter right off the plant . Cattail shoots not bitter and pretty tasty to me . Recently ate a bunch of the little Maple beans inside the helicopters and they werr fine . The Silver Maple are huge compared to others ( about the size of a Soy bean )
Any way Im excited about this weeks experiment . the root of the Solomans Seal . These are everywhere in the Eastern woodlands and here is about 10 minutes gathering . The roots are actually a bit sweet and the closest thing I can think of is Parsnips . So a great survival food til the Acorns and Hickory come and fill in after the greens all turn bitter .
http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/solomansseal/IMG_1279_2.jpg

http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/solomansseal/IMG_1281.jpg

Edit . What is shown is actually False Solomons Seal which have a plume like flower at the end of the stalk , unlike Solomons seal which have small bell like flowers suspended below the stalk . Rhizomes still edible but it is reccomended to dig them sparingly since they grow slowly . I still think you could locate 20 or 30 patches of these on a days hike and just levy a small edible tax on each patch .

Zig
04-29-2012, 03:01 PM
Nice work. This summer I really want to get on top of my hunting/gathering/fishing skills. I'll be sure to keep my eye out for these guys next time I'm in the woods!

xj35s
04-29-2012, 03:05 PM
I too want to do this. especially since I got a great book with pics and explanations as well as usage/prep procedures. Please keep posting you're finds and all the details. I appreciate it.

kgd
04-29-2012, 03:22 PM
Nice shot of those roots. I believe the plant pictured is false solomon's seal rather than true because the flower is at the end of the leaf rather than hanging under the leaves from the middle part of the stem.

Apparently, eaten in quantity the roots are also a laxative. Would you say a good handfull is enough to take effect or perhaps a bit more needed :D :D :D

Thanks for the excellent pictures. I always love wild edible threads.

riverjoe
04-29-2012, 03:33 PM
Nice shot of those roots. I believe the plant pictured is false solomon's seal rather than true because the flower is at the end of the leaf rather than hanging under the leaves from the middle part of the stem.

Apparently, eaten in quantity the roots are also a laxative. Would you say a good handfull is enough to take effect or perhaps a bit more needed :D :D :D

Thanks for the excellent pictures. I always love wild edible threads.

Good eye KGD I was busy editing my original photo before Edible Plant Guy came around and you already spotted the little plume . I did not read the laxative part . I think I'll monitor my activity after consuming that handfull .
Im not sure Im a good experimental candidate tho cause somebody told me drinking Maple Sap was a laxative too and nothing happened . If it does work tho that will lead right into my next useful plant the Basswood .

J
04-29-2012, 03:50 PM
Great pics riverjoe!! Ive been on a plant kick lately too. I just scored a copy of Thayers Natures Harvest to add to the plant book library after some good feedback from guys I trust. Spring is good times for plant walks. Anyways thanks for sharing.

riverjoe
04-29-2012, 04:14 PM
Great pics riverjoe!! Ive been on a plant kick lately too. I just scored a copy of Thayers Natures Harvest to add to the plant book library after some good feedback from guys I trust. Spring is good times for plant walks. Anyways thanks for sharing.


My library is weak right now I think . Ive got Ewels books which are entertaining for sure , Ive got Edible Wild Plants , which is more for recipes and the Audubon guide to Wildflowers which is good 1 month of the year and then weak the other 11 months .
On line stuff is great but I need it in the field . I'll check out your Thayers book maybe that will be helpful .
What I really want is photos like Audabun or a real definitive guide like Petersons . The recipes I can always look up later ,first I need to identify that puppy and also anything that looks remotely like it .that can kill me or make me sick .
Im thinking of Purple Angelica ( which edible plant guy identifyed ) and water Hemlock which has a very vague resemblance .

riverjoe
04-29-2012, 04:16 PM
Great pics riverjoe!! Ive been on a plant kick lately too. I just scored a copy of Thayers Natures Harvest to add to the plant book library after some good feedback from guys I trust. Spring is good times for plant walks. Anyways thanks for sharing.


My library is weak right now I think . Ive got Ewels books which are entertaining for sure , Ive got Edible Wild Plants , which is more for recipes and the Audubon guide to Wildflowers which is good 1 month of the year and then weak the other 11 months .
On line stuff is great but I need it in the field http://bushcraftusa.com/forum/showthread.php?t=62636 . I'll check out your Thayers book maybe that will be helpful .
What I really want is photos like Audabun or a real definitive guide like Petersons . The recipes I can always look up later ,first I need to identify that puppy and also anything that looks remotely like it .that can kill me or make me sick .
Im thinking of Purple Angelica ( which edible plant guy identifyed ) and water Hemlock which has a very vague resemblance .

mainewoods
04-29-2012, 06:16 PM
Nice info. riverjoe. Thanks Great for a upset stomach and itching or a rash.

riverjoe
04-30-2012, 10:30 AM
Its like my buddy told me AFTER I invested heavily in his brother in laws Mexican gold mine . You should do your own research Joe . LOL

riverjoe
04-30-2012, 11:38 AM
So went down in the bottom looking for true Solomans seal . Difficult to tell the differance if not in bloom . Supposedly the true leaf stalk breaks off the rhizome leaving a scar that looks like Solomans seal . That is a little circle . I believe the true SS has a whiter and less fibrous rhizome .
While down there I picked a Jack in the Pulpit which is also called Indian Turnip but the turnip has expended all its energy making Jack this time of year . Do not try tasting one of these without cooking you will never try another .
Also found anohter Greenbriar vine . Only vine with thorns and tendrils . Leaves are distinctive also. Our kind has little wimpy thorns unlike some others . I think these are one of the best salad greens ie the tender new leaves and tendrils .
While down there encountered these rare Ladyslippers not edible but purdy .

http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/solomansseal/IMG_1283.jpg

http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/solomansseal/IMG_1289.jpg

http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/solomansseal/IMG_1288.jpg

http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/solomansseal/IMG_1290.jpg

http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/solomansseal/IMG_1284.jpg

J
04-30-2012, 12:33 PM
Ive always heard Jack in a pulpit is toxic, however Ive read the roots can be edible if they are dried for a few months before cooking and eating, and it has medicinal value for sore throats etc. The fruit and seeds im unsure about. I tend to stay away from plants that info is sketchy on toxic or no, and what parts are toxic and not, and cooking vs stages of ripeness for toxicity. What do they taste like when prepared right?

Cool pics Joe. I dont think Ive ever seen em around here. Saw em in IA and Indiana though.

riverjoe
04-30-2012, 12:52 PM
I've never had them prepared right . Prepared wrong there is a chemical burn probabley a lot like Drano . I have read that after drying etc there is almost a chocalate flavor .
Quite a few books and blurbs just say they need to be cooked . The problem with them is by the time you've spotted them the turnip is kind of used up . If you would take note and then harvest in the fall would be the thing I think .

As is my habit I read the first paragraph of some description that said Jack in the Pulpit may have a hot flavor or something like that so I took a big bite of a raw one once . It was the most unpleasant oral sensation I ever had . ( well maybe a root canal) .

MtnManJoe
04-30-2012, 12:57 PM
We have False SolomonSeal here in the PNW (as well as the several other varieties)
I think that the flowers of the FSS (at just the right time of year) is one of the most aromatic of all the woods-plants.
The sorrels (wood sorrel and sheep sorrel) are pretty yummy.
Both of the 'Miners Lettuce" varieties are good.
Many lily 'bulbs' are pretty good (be careful with identification here)
Most of the Thistles are pretty good.
Fire Weed (pith) - Yummy
... Lots of good 'munchies' out there

Zig
04-30-2012, 01:12 PM
Great pics riverjoe!! Ive been on a plant kick lately too. I just scored a copy of Thayers Natures Harvest to add to the plant book library after some good feedback from guys I trust. Spring is good times for plant walks. Anyways thanks for sharing.

+1 on the Thayer books. I've got both and they are not only very informative, but also entertaining to read. You can tell that he genuinely lives the gathering lifestyle.


--
Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk so please forgive any typos.

J
04-30-2012, 01:23 PM
I've never had them prepared right . Prepared wrong there is a chemical burn probabley a lot like Drano . I have read that after drying etc there is almost a chocalate flavor .
Quite a few books and blurbs just say they need to be cooked . The problem with them is by the time you've spotted them the turnip is kind of used up . If you would take note and then harvest in the fall would be the thing I think .

As is my habit I read the first paragraph of some description that said Jack in the Pulpit may have a hot flavor or something like that so I took a big bite of a raw one once . It was the most unpleasant oral sensation I ever had . ( well maybe a root canal) .

Sorry joe, I accidentaly hit edit post instead of reply when I replied to your last post. Hence why it says I edited your post. lol


Interesting stuff. I always like the plant threads.

Chem burn in the mouth cant be fun. lol

J
04-30-2012, 01:26 PM
+1 on the Thayer books. I've got both and they are not only very informative, but also entertaining to read. You can tell that he genuinely lives the gathering lifestyle.


--
Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk so please forgive any typos.

Yeah I just bought it at barnes and noble on friday night, but Ive read about 30 pages in it so far. Its a great read. Not many plants in it, but its very informative on several differant species. Not written like a field guide makes it easy to absorb the info. Great book.

Some others I use are Wild Berries and Fruits of IL, IA and MO, and Trees of Missouri. Specific to my area, but they would be good books for most anywhere. Really well done field guides.

riverjoe
04-30-2012, 01:51 PM
I see Peterson makes a field guide to wild edibles . Thinking that might be the most bang for the buck if its like their trees and shrubs . Lots of differant species with no nonsense ID .
Anybody own one ?

GeorgeHedgepeth
04-30-2012, 02:44 PM
Yes- it is very broad, insufficiently deep. Seriously, it is so limited that I rarely use it except as an id guide in the field. Sam Thayer's books are the way to go.He is instructing at an event I am helping to put on this August.

J
04-30-2012, 02:47 PM
I have it too, and the color photos are slim. Its good as a backup to look up plants you think you have a positive ID on, and for additional info on species you have looked up in other books.

smokejumper
04-30-2012, 04:16 PM
Nice post riverjoe. I didn't know maple seeds were edible. I've got one about 10 steps away right now (silver) in the back yard that I'm fixing to test.

Zig
04-30-2012, 05:15 PM
I feel like the Peterson's guide is useful especially in the field for ID practice and for reference on plants you've already learned to ID and process from a book like Thayer's.


--
Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk so please forgive any typos.

riverjoe
04-30-2012, 05:40 PM
Nice post riverjoe. I didn't know maple seeds were edible. I've got one about 10 steps away right now (silver) in the back yard that I'm fixing to test.

Those Silver are really prolific and they're big enough to make your labor worhwhile . My native american buddy likes to parch them in a hot skillet .

lonetracker
05-01-2012, 09:23 PM
+on thayers books.less overall plants in them but many pictures and tons of info on each plant.i have petersons as well.i like it ,it was the first i got and i am the most familiar with it so i tend to reach for it first.it has few pictures,mostly drawings and just a short description of each plant.
my advise is to leave those jack in the pulpit corms alone.i dug a bunch once and cut some thin and dried them by the fire till they were almost crumbly and i still got the burnt mouth and a burbly stomach the next day.i brought the rest home sliced them dried them in the oven,left them air dry a few more days and they still burnt my mouth.i think i read the only way to get rid of the calcium oxilate,(the stuff that burns your mouth) is by thorough drying(really,really thorough i guess).cooking or boiling does not remove it.
i also like those solomons seal roots.primrose root is also good.burdock root is ok,better roasted

riverjoe
05-01-2012, 10:16 PM
Never heard about the primrose roots . Have to try those . I guess I'm going to bite the bullet and get both books , might be able to save on shipping anyway .
Found some Milkweed down by the bridge and guess I'll give that a try . I would like to find enough stuff around here on the 40 or 50 acres that surround me to sustain a person if it were necessary . Probabley on the good years a guy could come up with couple hundred pounds of Acorns but most are Red Oak which take just too much leaching I am on a mission to identify and find the White Oaks . Also lots of Hickory but many have grubs ,which I guess are nutricious enoght but I'm just not committed enough yet .
Also plan to convert my primitive dugout with fire cave into a smoker for carp and sucker . The bass , bluegill and rockbass Im just gonna eat .

One thing I did see concerning insect consumption was a youtube by Ray Mears in which he throws a big ant hill onto a poncho and then leaves part of it folded over . The workers all take the eggs to the shaded part and concentrate them for him .He then just dumps the eggs into a hot skillet . THings ever get rough enough on the trail up there in the north country for that ?

pure_mahem
05-01-2012, 11:43 PM
I'ld love to learn edible plants but I'm not jumping in with out a Hands On Course in my Area. Pretty cool what your doing though, be careful though some plants don't have cures, I do know that!

GeorgeHedgepeth
05-02-2012, 09:09 AM
Try burdock roots shaved and panfried into hash browns... pretty good!

Scott Allen
05-02-2012, 11:27 AM
Never heard about the primrose roots . Have to try those . I guess I'm going to bite the bullet and get both books , might be able to save on shipping anyway .
Found some Milkweed down by the bridge and guess I'll give that a try .

Joe, I don't know your level of plant knowledge, but be careful that it is truely milkweed. Dogbane looks a whole lot like milkweed, but is highly poisonous. I can't remember now all the ways to tell, but one is that milkweed has more fuzz on the underside of the leaf and stem.

Scott

mountain girl
05-02-2012, 12:21 PM
Have you guys ever tried stinging nettle? I love it! It isn't bitter at all, and you don't get stung if you boil it like greens. Of course, like with all greens they are much better when they are just coming up in the spring time. You really only need to snap off the tops, and then you don't have to deal with stems and the plant lives. I've put it in eggs, cooked kale, and on pizza too.

Stinging Nettle is one of the most nutritious wild foods. It is high in iron, calcium, potassium, manganese and Vitamins A, C and D. It promotes elimination of uric acid in joints, and the iron content makes a good blood builder and the presence of Vitamin C aids in the iron absorption. So, it's an excellent plant for anemia and fatigue. As well as being tastey. :)

bearkat
05-02-2012, 01:51 PM
+1 FOR Thayers books. The petersons manuals aren't bad.

Thayer talks about some of the other manuals in his books and how they have mistakes. I've found a few pictures labeled wrong in the Petersons books. I wouldn't have even noticed it if I hadn't read Thayer’s books first and was aware of the possibility of a misprint.

I also like "Identifying and Harvesting Edible and Medicinal Plants in Wild (and Not So Wild) Places" by Steve Brill

woodsmith
05-02-2012, 02:11 PM
I feel like the Peterson's guide is useful especially in the field for ID practice and for reference on plants you've already learned to ID and process from a book like Thayer's.


I'm a newb, but that's my experience so far. Peterson guide for field ID backed up with cross-referencing Elias and Dykeman's "Edible Wild Plants", the Thayer Books, and other local/regional guides once I get home.

I've taken a couple of classes (one regional, one local) and that helped a lot. My method for ID works like this when I'm out on my own:

*concentrate on one species/family generally (right now I'm on the hunt for stinging nettle, for example)
*use the Peterson guide for field ID.
*collect sample of plant (where appropriate, if it's only a single plant I won't pick it I'll just do photos, if there are plenty I will try to collect 1 complete plant including roots)
*bring home to cross reference in other books and reliable web sources.
*double check ID
*triple check ID
*check for poisonous "look-a-likes"
*quadruple check ID
*collect small amount of plant to prepare and taste
*prepare it
*taste it
*make sure I don't have an allergic reaction (I live along, I generally tell someone I'm trying a new plant, that way if they don't hear from me they know to call 911). I'm probably overly paranoid, but it's not fun to be on your own and struggling to get help!

Then if I like it I'll add it in to my repetoire of plants I know I can eat.

Kind of an involved process, but poisoning is no fun.

It's been hard to find things beyond berries that are palatable. Curly dock is abundant but the local variety tastes awful no matter how I prepare it. I've tried young leaves and slightly older.

Pepper grass/shepards purse is my current favorite, I really like the mustardy/peppery flavor. Unfortunately I live in an urban environment and the only abundant stands I've found are next to roads in areas where I know the soil is contaminated with heavy metals....still looking for a "safe" patch I can harvest from!

riverjoe
05-03-2012, 09:27 AM
I wish I could just copy this guys websight in color . Its got a great mix of identifying characeristics and info on toxic look alikes . I just wish it were in a small book to carry along .

http://www.foragingtexas.com/

PineMartyn
05-08-2012, 08:00 AM
My wife and I love foraging for wild edible plants on our hikes and camping trips. While we have tried a lot of the 'survival foods', just so we'll know what they are, how to harvest them and what they taste like, we concentrate on wild edibles that are actually tasty.

Many of the wild edible plants people talk about are so unpalatable and bitter that they are emetic (vomit-inducing), which won't help you in serious situation. And there are regional differences to consider. For instance, my wife and I have been told that milkweed pods and flowers are too bitter...and they surely are in some places, but where we live, they are a choice, tasty edible. Soil and water conditions make a huge difference, so one just has to try these things at least once where one lives to discover if they are enjoyable.

But once you find the choice edibles in your area...what a pleasure it is to forage for, locate, harvest and eat them when you're out hiking or camping.
Here's a link to a vid we made a few weeks ago about the satisfactions of spring edibles.
Wild Edible Plants of Early Spring - YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bUSUOGlQRRg&feature=plcp)

Hope this helps,
-Martin

riverjoe
05-08-2012, 10:47 AM
Wonderful video guys . Trout Lilly blew me away , my woods is carpeted with those
. I remember reading of Spring Beauty years ago but have never identified them , Ill have to renew my efforts .
Euell mentions three boiling water changes for Milkweed , do you agree with that . Also he says the water must be in a rolling boil when you plunge in the plant .
Recently experimented with the Toothwort or pepper root . Very much like Horseradish so might be a good spice .
Look forward to more videos from you folks . Your hardwood forests look a lot like ours .

GeorgeHedgepeth
05-08-2012, 11:06 AM
Euell mentions three boiling water changes for Milkweed , do you agree with that

I NEVER do that- it is not necessary.

Skab
05-08-2012, 11:23 AM
Hell I don't even boil my milkweed. Takes some of the flavor away in my opinion. And on the Dog Bane thing. Once you have actually identified Dog bane and milkweed they really don't look that much alike once they get past the sprout/shoot stage.

I have an on going post on my adventures with milkweed here:

http://bushcraftusa.com/forum/showthread.php?t=14081&highlight=milkweed

riverjoe
05-08-2012, 02:26 PM
Hell I don't even boil my milkweed. Takes some of the flavor away in my opinion. And on the Dog Bane thing. Once you have actually identified Dog bane and milkweed they really don't look that much alike once they get past the sprout/shoot stage.

I have an on going post on my adventures with milkweed here:

http://bushcraftusa.com/forum/showthread.php?t=14081&highlight=milkweed
OK stir fry it is . I have been surrounded by Milkweed my whole life . Back in the country where I grew up we used the latex to stick stuff on paper or each other . we used the pods and seeds for all kind of kid things . Now when Im finaly aware of its edibiltiy I have to worry about Dogbane .
Never was aware of such a weed and I still have yet to identify him , but it is a mission now .

Blackhawk45hunter
05-08-2012, 05:22 PM
Dogbane has solid, white pith.
Milkweed is hollow.

Dogbane leaves have a very prominent central vein
Milkweed leaves have more subtle central veins

Dogbane branches out when I gets older
Milkweed does not branch out



It's a very healthy and tasty vegetable and I highly recommend it.
Just boil till its tender and enjoy with some salt and a little butter.
I tastes kind of like a combination of broccoli and asparagus.

PineMartyn
05-08-2012, 09:22 PM
Wonderful video guys . [...] Euell mentions three boiling water changes for Milkweed , do you agree with that . Also he says the water must be in a rolling boil when you plunge in the plant .


Thanks RiverJoe. That's very nice of you to say. We're delighted that you enjoyed the video.
As others have posted here, we don't bother boiling our milkweed at all, but this might be one of those regional differences. The flowers and pods of milkweeds in this part of Ontario seem to be positively mild and sweet and so boiling is not required.
As a counter-example, we have known people who've said that Water Lilly roots are fine once they are boiled, but 'round here, no matter how many times we boil them, we can't choke them down. They are just too bitter, no matter what time of year we've tried it, even as survival food. One just has to experiment to find out what will work. It's no use "knowing" what's edible in theory, when in practice, much of the food you think is available around you is inedible where you live.

A word about Trout Lillies, since you say they are plentiful where you live: Get them early. Most wild edibles start off fairly mild and succulent and grow in bitterness as they mature. In the case of Trout Lillies, by the time they have begun to flower and the leaves are big and deeply mottled, they are already much less appetizing, so if they have begun flowering, choose the smallest, late-sprouting (least mottled) leaves. And don't forget the corms. Yummy.

When it comes to Spring Beauty, I find that they don't get any worse with time. They have a really nice potato flavour with a slightly peppery aftertaste...and that's just the stem and flower. The corm is even more filling.

Happy foraging!
-Martin

sotramk
05-08-2012, 10:33 PM
+1 on Stinging and Wood Nettle for greens, broth and tea.
Mints are a favorite of mine both for tea and a refreshing pinch between cheek and gum.
sot

riverjoe
05-09-2012, 10:30 PM
Pretty sure I have found my Dogbane patch . I was up at the lake gathering willow shoots when I noticed these weird last year bean pods .

http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/swamp/IMG_1310.jpg

And these shoot coming up all around the dried up stalks .

http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/swamp/IMG_1313.jpg

Do not have hollow stems and no fine hairs on stalk or underside of leaves .

http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/swamp/IMG_1314.jpg

Blackhawk45hunter
05-10-2012, 08:24 AM
What are you gonna do with the dogbane? Make cordage?

riverjoe
05-10-2012, 08:32 AM
What are you gonna do with the dogbane? Make cordage?

Actually I have not thought past just identifying it . I wanted to be able to do that before sitting down to buffet of Dogbane thinking it was Milkweed .
If you harvest it before flowers and seed pods form it could easily be mistaken for Milkweed I think . Thanks for your tip about the stem that is a real good indicator I think .
The fine hairs on the Milkweed although present aren't readily visible to me without my glasses that is .

http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/swamp/IMG_1302.jpg

Blackhawk45hunter
05-10-2012, 09:03 AM
I've always thought the fine hairs are a deceptive indicator because they both have fine hairs on the bottom of their eaves and that could be taken as an indicator that it is milkweed when in fact it is dogbane. I always use the cut stem method, but once you get used to it, dogbane will stand out as dogbane and milkweed will start to look like milkweed.

If its hollow, it's dinner!
Enjoy man, let us know how you like it!

Blackhawk45hunter
05-11-2012, 07:55 PM
Another thing I should probably add... milkweed and dogbane CAN grow side by side, so just cause you ID dogbane, doesn't mean it's all dogbane. There might sill be some tasty milkweed in there. Just cut the stems to be sure and enjoy!

riverjoe
05-11-2012, 08:30 PM
Another member and I are going on a little overnighter this weekend and I know there are milkweed around up there at the campsight . Also hoping for some crawdads and hopefully a catfish for breakfast .
Lots of true Solomans Seal and thistle so should be enough for some serious edibles .
Actually we're installing a semi permanant latrine so not a lot of time for fishing and gathering .

Blackhawk45hunter
05-11-2012, 09:48 PM
Sounds good man! Post about it when you get back so we can hear all about it!

Easy_rider75
05-11-2012, 10:42 PM
Great pics riverjoe!! Ive been on a plant kick lately too. I just scored a copy of Thayers Natures Harvest to add to the plant book library after some good feedback from guys I trust. Spring is good times for plant walks. Anyways thanks for sharing.

Good post Joe


Just gonna be getting this book as payment for one of my carvings. Something I very much wanna get better knowledge of is wild edibles

riverjoe
05-13-2012, 08:49 PM
http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/forageing/IMG_1344.jpg

Primary mission . Thunderbox ...... Had to dig about a five foot deep hole and install water softener tank in same ( with bottom cut out ) so not a lot of time since we got started late Sat . and had to leave early Sun. Sorry about focus but who really cares about a thunderbox .
So this thistle was about 40 feet away from the campfire . Stripped the leaves down to these stems and the boiled them . I had so few I just added to this Ramen soup and it was a remarkable improvement . Kind of like cooked celery but maybe better .
http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/forageing/IMG_1328.jpg

http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/forageing/IMG_1340.jpg

Saturday night just making a little stuff around the campfire so I threw my bell dingy pole in the river . Only about 10 feet away from the campfire .
Now this isn't really fishing in an active sense since the bullheads will pretty well hook themselves . I was using maple flavored bacon with a little blood potion squirted on it .
Now a lot of fisherman consider these the low hanging fruit of the fish family but if you are busy doing other things like surviving or installing latrines this is the way to forage fish .
My crawdad traps produced nothing which surprised m since the river is full of them .
Maybe some consider bullheads not such great eating but I bet they never had em out of a clean river , rolled in cornmeal fried fast and hard and served in a canteen cup .
http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/forageing/IMG_1347.jpg

http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/forageing/IMG_1348.jpg

http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/forageing/IMG_1349.jpg

http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/forageing/IMG_1350.jpg

lonetracker
05-13-2012, 10:06 PM
i would eat those bullheads.looks tasty.
similar meal.thistle,roma,and some brook trout.
http://i793.photobucket.com/albums/yy219/lonetracker/trips%202010/DSCN34110001.jpg

riverjoe
05-14-2012, 09:26 AM
That looks like the main stem . Illl have to try that . I think Brook Trout may be a little higher up the culinary scale , but they require more work I bet .:30:

Easy_rider75
05-14-2012, 10:48 AM
http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/forageing/IMG_1344.jpg

Primary mission . Thunderbox ...... Had to dig about a five foot deep hole and install water softener tank in same ( with bottom cut out ) so not a lot of time since we got started late Sat . and had to leave early Sun. Sorry about focus but who really cares about a thunderbox .
So this thistle was about 40 feet away from the campfire . Stripped the leaves down to these stems and the boiled them . I had so few I just added to this Ramen soup and it was a remarkable improvement . Kind of like cooked celery but maybe better .
http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/forageing/IMG_1328.jpg

http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/forageing/IMG_1340.jpg

Saturday night just making a little stuff around the campfire so I threw my bell dingy pole in the river . Only about 10 feet away from the campfire .
Now this isn't really fishing in an active sense since the bullheads will pretty well hook themselves . I was using maple flavored bacon with a little blood potion squirted on it .
Now a lot of fisherman consider these the low hanging fruit of the fish family but if you are busy doing other things like surviving or installing latrines this is the way to forage fish .
My crawdad traps produced nothing which surprised m since the river is full of them .
Maybe some consider bullheads not such great eating but I bet they never had em out of a clean river , rolled in cornmeal fried fast and hard and served in a canteen cup .
http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/forageing/IMG_1347.jpg

http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/forageing/IMG_1348.jpg

http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/forageing/IMG_1349.jpg

http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/forageing/IMG_1350.jpg


Hey Joe any chance of a close up of your pot rack ya got the fry pan sitting on?

riverjoe
05-14-2012, 11:34 AM
Hey Joe any chance of a close up of your pot rack ya got the fry pan sitting on?

Its just some number 9 wire doubled over and twisted . I just coil it up inside my big aluminum pot and then bend it to fit the fire . Not too great but better then nothing .

riverjoe
05-18-2012, 09:34 PM
Pokeweed week . I always remember Poke too late . I look around and they're about 2 feet high which is in the poison stage I guess . Well this year I remembered in time .
There is one right on the edge of the woods that I've made ink out of and I harvested some new leaves and gave them a try .

http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/forageing/IMG_1352.jpg

This is my little backyard setup .
Rolling boil for 10 minutes , throw away the water and then boil again.

http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/forageing/IMG_1354.jpg

http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/forageing/IMG_1356.jpg

Through in a couple of thistle stems for body . Very tasty similar to collard or mustard greens .

http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad289/riverjoe47/forageing/IMG_1357.jpg


Another thing I should probably add... milkweed and dogbane CAN grow side by side, so just cause you ID dogbane, doesn't mean it's all dogbane. There might sill be some tasty milkweed in there. Just cut the stems to be sure and enjoy!
This was good advice . Went back to Dogbane patch and found lots of Milkweed . Very tastey with just one quick boil . Little flowerettes like broccoli just great .

GeorgeHedgepeth
05-21-2012, 08:15 AM
We did an edible plants course and hike Saturday here in Michigan. We found a lot of stuff and had a nice meal, including many plants we forraged.

The meal had a saute of ramps (bulbs and tops), burdock root, nettle tops, Thistle Stems, and violet greens; packets of Day Lilly tubers roasted under the coals, skewers of deer steak seasones with wild ginger, and a nice small mouth that was fileted and cooked right on the coals.

Hard to spend a day better as far as I am concerned!