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bcmolcb
06-10-2012, 02:58 PM
Hey there, I was just wondering if anyone had any knowledge on how to add draw weight to a simple recurve. It's at about 35* I'd like to get it to 50-70*

bclark
06-10-2012, 03:04 PM
probably not what you want to here, but i would just get a new bow in the poundage you want. i have never heard of adding poundage to a bow, but then again a bowyer i am not. beware of any easy solution or it might blow up in your face... literally.

Keyser Söze
06-10-2012, 03:14 PM
get another bow ,lol

NJWHN95
06-10-2012, 03:25 PM
What bow is it? The only thing that I can think of (although I am not expert) is that you MIGHT be able to add weight if it is a takedown bow because you could get different limbs. Of course, as others said, your best bet is to just get a new bow. If money is an issue then you could look at some used bows or something, or even try to make your own if you have the ability (I have a friend than made one, and while it isn't perfect it is incredibly cool that he made it himself).

ineffableone
06-10-2012, 04:31 PM
As mentioned the only real way to add # to a bow is if it is a Take Down bow and you buy new limbs with a heavier #. There are small increases in performance from different strings. For example I got a string that made me have to increase the spine weight of my arrows. Making my 50# bow shoot 55-60 spined arrows. However this is not an actual # increase.

If your looking at having to buy a new bow, you might consider the Samick Sage TD recurve. It is what I have, and if you look around you will see it is an inexpensive but great shooting bow. It has a wise range of limbs you can buy with different # and you can even switch back and forth easily if you want to practice with lighter weight limbs for your normal practice.

mjh
06-10-2012, 04:38 PM
Don't know what type of bow you have but as other suggested new limbs or new bow in the weight you want would be your best best If you don't mind destroying the bow you have you could expirement with adding layers of fiberglass cloth epoxied down until you get the proper weight. Would need to experiement I would think, helmet and safty glasses when testing too......trading up is not a bad way to go either.....

stronghorse
06-10-2012, 04:41 PM
Have you considered some type of backing or laminate?

riverjoe
06-10-2012, 04:44 PM
According to the Bowyers Bible you can shorten it to add draw weight at least on a long bow . Trickier on a recurve I'm sure .

riverjoe
06-10-2012, 04:46 PM
According to the Bowyers Bible you can shorten it to add draw weight at least on a long bow . Trickier on a recurve I'm sure . Probabley ruin it .

tree-ratsniper
06-10-2012, 10:43 PM
Rawhide or snakeskin backing is a common method, but will only add a few pounds. You may have to glue up another lamination.

I have read that some folks have added some weight by using veneer edging (the kind for fixing particle board furniture). I bought a Cedan "real wood" brand red oak roll that is 2" x 8' at the local menards. I'm sure any building box store will carry some.

Hope this helps...

K Harris
06-10-2012, 11:04 PM
a longbow can be shortened to increase draw weight. However, It is almost exclusively done on self bows. It is impossible to do that with a recurve because of the geometry of the working limb, and the fact the the whole thing is glued up under pressure using a specific formula. About the only thing you can add after it is tillered is a backing like snake skin. However, This will not noticably increase the draw weight. You can reduce the draw weight on them by thining the limbs, but even then you are limited to about 5 pounds.

zero40484
06-11-2012, 12:28 AM
Maby use a shorter string, and if the bow is 35lbs at say 26" draw then drawing it at 28-29" will add something like 3lbs/inch. You may not get to 55-60 lbs but you will get more umph.

Fred bear used a 45 lb pull bow to kill just about everything on this continent and africa

mpeace13
06-11-2012, 12:41 AM
I've never done this myself so take it for what it's worth, but I've read about cordage backed bows. I don't know if it's applicable to recurves but you basically increase the draw weight with cordage on the back. Google it and you'll find some interesting reading. Some of them look pretty amazing too.

pedro
06-11-2012, 06:35 AM
OP plainly stated that bow in question is simple recurve. It is NOT a selfbow! He would gain nothing by trying to back it, and would ruin the bow.

bcmolcb, use the 35# to work on your form. As someone else mentioned, the Samick Sage has a great reputation. I am curious about your desire to jump 15-25 lbs in draw weight. That's a big jump. You could easily find yourself overbowed.

JEB
06-11-2012, 08:43 AM
Like most everyone said, pick up another bow. You may want to check with members of archery clubs in your area. The trad guys may have bows you can try out before you invest. If you lived in Michigan and near me I have many bows you could try.

Stop at yard sales and ask for archery equipment even if its not out. I picked up a Browning Wasp, 47# last thursday by just asking. And I paid $5.00 for it and its an 8 out of 10 in condition. Made a new string and its a real shooter.

Check on Tradgang and stickbow and see where there is a club is near you.

bcmolcb
06-11-2012, 02:27 PM
thank you all i appreciate it greatly

mpeace13
06-11-2012, 04:24 PM
There are methods of cordage backing that require no gluing or anything. It wouldn't ruin a bow.

tree-ratsniper
06-11-2012, 09:09 PM
There are methods of cordage backing that require no gluing or anything. It wouldn't ruin a bow.

Agreed, & I have handled many modern production laminate recurves and longbows that have been snakeskin or rawhide backed, none of which have been ruined. I would encourage you to talk to an expert like Mike Yancy of Pine Hollow Longbows. Mike makes a living selling backing materials & bow making supplies:
http://www.pinehollowlongbows.com

bootstrap
07-08-2012, 10:35 PM
I would jusy get a nice take down bow. Then you can get new limbs for whatever situation.

The Hunter
07-09-2012, 07:38 AM
Hey there, I was just wondering if anyone had any knowledge on how to add draw weight to a simple recurve. It's at about 35* I'd like to get it to 50-70*

I am a designer and bowyer and the honest truth is simply that its not going to happen. If it were a longbow the tips could be spikes a bit to add weight but to spike one enough to add that much weight would take so much of the performance away it would not be useful as a bow.

If you spiked a recurve the performance would drop significantly and would not be close to the desired weight.

There is no backing you can put on it and even on self bows the backing needs to be weighed against how much you add vs the limbs mass or again it will preform so poorly its not worth it.

Bottom line here is get another bow in the poundage you want or purchase a take down and buy multiple sets of limbs but be remember the price of limbs can be as much as halt to 2/3's the price of the bow itself with commercial td's being cheaper.