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azbush
08-29-2012, 10:41 PM
don't know if this is where this post should go.

however down to the point. obviously gun oil and even wd40 are good for lubricating a blade and i've heard vegetable oil works as well. anyone know if olive oil is effective and safe?

Pat1973
08-29-2012, 10:46 PM
I use vegetable oil on my knives for a very long time,knives i know i might use with food,olive oil is natural,if its good for cooking,well its good for a knife!

66c10
08-29-2012, 10:48 PM
Olive oil will go rancid. Not an issue for an EDC blade that is constantly being used, washed and then oiled. Definitely an issue for a hunting or woods knife that doesn't see as much action. Mineral oil is your best non-toxic option that won't go bad.

Youcantreadinthedark
08-29-2012, 10:51 PM
I don't put anything on my knives that isn't food safe. I've been lubricating with olive oil for years, and never had a problem with it. I have heard, though, that it will go rancid, it will gum up a sheath fast, it emulsifies in hot conditions (that one seems to bend the laws of physics), and a lot of other negative things. But apparently they're all negative things that happen to other people. I wouldn't use vegetable oil - it's practically synthetic these days. That said, I have knives that are tools, and get trashed, washed, resharpened and re-oiled frequently. I'm not a collector or preserver of knives, I care nothing for resale value, and someone in that category may have a different and more professional opinion.
I build a lot of wood projects that must necessarily be food safe, and I don't like to put chemicals on things in general, and most people I know recommend sesame oil, tung oil, and walnut oil for wood projects. Of those three, sesame oil is the least likely to spoil, and if you're nervous about olive oil then open the sezmee.

Backcountry Patriot
08-29-2012, 11:01 PM
I use it all the time on my blades and have never had a problem with it. I carry it for that purpose, for cooking oil and other things of that nature and it works well for me. I say use it!

Ned
08-29-2012, 11:10 PM
It's certainly better than not oiling your blades at all but you could do a lot better than olive oil. Olive oil isn't even all that cheap anyways. You can get all sorts of machine oil cheap and plentiful, made for metal, like 3-in-1, sewing machine oil, turbine oil, etc. If you don't want to use mineral oil or gun oil (which are pretty much the same thing).

wls
08-29-2012, 11:10 PM
don't know if this is where this post should go.

however down to the point. obviously gun oil and even wd40 are good for lubricating a blade and i've heard vegetable oil works as well. anyone know if olive oil is effective and safe?

I know olive oil can get rancid. Never had any problem with mineral oil or WD-40.

azbush
08-29-2012, 11:35 PM
thanks to everyone for the good insight my blades will enjoy it :)

Bushcraftgeek
08-29-2012, 11:54 PM
One item that i've heard some use that works well is butcher block conditioner or butcher block oil. food safe and everything at times expensive but its good for knife blades and the knife handle if its wood. and if you happen to use wooden spoons or bowls or even make them itd work good. food grade natural waxes and mineral oil the oil itself don't have waxes but the conditioner does

karlhungusjr
08-30-2012, 12:27 AM
any type of oil that you use in the kitchen will work just fine.

Mudman
08-30-2012, 12:45 AM
Over oiling is usually when it goes rancid, this is what I've read for Dutch ovens at least. A lot of people use all types of cooking oil as well as mineral oil. Just make sure it's a super super thin coat.

Never had any issues with Olive oil. I basically coat the blade, and wipe with a towel. Only recently I've started using mineral oil. But the process is still the same.

GreyOne
08-30-2012, 04:33 AM
Olive oil works just fine for me, but I prefer mineral oil for general use on my metal tools. Not going rancid is one of its benefits, being non pest attractive is another, and as mentioned, it doesn't go rancid.

rdec
08-30-2012, 05:25 AM
I use mineral oil on hone stones (as opposed to diamond) so I usually have a small bottle anyhow so I use that to oil blades, too. You don't need a lot, a few drops on the corner of a paper towel does fine.

wingnuts
08-30-2012, 06:01 AM
thanks everyone just an FYI WD-40 is not a lube! it's a water displacer, yes it feels oily but offers little protection or lubrication

Two Bears
08-30-2012, 06:50 AM
In my 30 or 35 years I have never oild any of my knives except a folder at the joint and that was because it needed it from heavy constant use and crap in the joint, I have always kept my blades clean and sharp, use it, clean it, and sharpen if needed and it's good to go.

BushMetal
08-30-2012, 07:09 AM
Only use food grade stuff here, but Not usually mineral oil(a petroleum distillate)

Coconut oil does very well, wont rancid, 100% natural

swoody126
08-30-2012, 07:30 AM
Olive oil will go rancid. Not an issue for an EDC blade that is constantly being used, washed and then oiled. Definitely an issue for a hunting or woods knife that doesn't see as much action. Mineral oil is your best non-toxic option that won't go bad.

mineral oil has been the choice of cutting board makers for many years, NON TOXIC & DOESN'T SPOIL

if you use a thin coating of olive oil & it does get/go rancid, just give the tool a nice warm sudzy bath, dry completely & re-apply

could use a petroleum based oil for long term storage, wash well & coat w/ olive oil during the season of use

2, cha-ching

sw

DomC
08-30-2012, 08:25 AM
I use mineral oil bought from Wal Mart...
DomC

TreekillerX
08-30-2012, 08:38 AM
From a cabinetmaker's point of view, I would recommend camellia or jojoba oil. Both have a long history of protecting blades and iron tools, are natural and non-toxic and pretty inexpensive for a specialty item. Here's a couple of links for some more information:
http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/camelliaoilspray240ml.aspx

And a handy applicator that is kit friendly: http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/aburatsubotooloiler.aspx

wildernessnerd
08-30-2012, 08:49 AM
I use mineral that I buy from a drug store that's labeled as a laxative. I give it to my children when there having stomach problems. So I know it's non-toxic. I also use the same mineral oil on all the cutting boards I have to keep them conditioned.

http://www.walgreens.com/store/c/walgreens-mineral-oil-intestinal-lubricant/ID=prod5593964-product

rdec
08-30-2012, 10:18 AM
Jojoba oil has one interesting feature, it doesn't "crawl". Watchmakers used to use sperm whale oil in timepieces because it does move from where it was placed. Whale oil has long been N/A in these parts but it turns out the jojoba oil has the same characteristics.

Matrix
08-30-2012, 05:38 PM
I didn't know olive oil could go bad, we've had some in a bottle a long time as well as vegetable oil.
I got a .5oz. contact cleanser dropper bottle and put some olive oil in it not long ago and put a drop on either side of my Clipper and smear with with my finger. I use it for cutting food too so I don't want WD40 or other that's not food grade.
I also use olive oil on my sharpening stone and you can also put a few drops on a cotton ball for fire making.

spyder1958
08-30-2012, 07:23 PM
I use walnut oil on all my wooden handle kitchen knives and outdoor knives. Never a problem

bourbon&bisquits
08-30-2012, 07:35 PM
Coconut oil----naturally antibacterial and antifungal & very stable at room temp

http://coconutoilcooking.com/coconut-oil-blog-posts/top-10-household-uses-for-coconut-oil/

if you are going to use coconut oil for knives and healthy cooking/living--- look for an organic cold pressed extra virgin product like Nutiva

Wanderlost
08-30-2012, 08:01 PM
any type of oil that you use in the kitchen will work just fine.

This is spot on for any blade that is going to be used to cut foodstuffs.... whether that be your BK17 or Mora
or whatever....
When you talk of mineral oil, I assume you are talking engine oil, then that is a no-no as far as using on a
blade that will be used on foodstuff....
WD40 is a solvent-based oil, which is GREAT for cleaning up rusted metal or otherwise corroded/seized components,
but it will evaporate after use (in time) - leaving your dearly-beloved metal implement at the mercy of the elements...
In other words - corrode..!!
If you use WD40 to clean or free something you hold dear to you, then always use a good quality oil or preservative
for protection afterwards....

rdec
08-30-2012, 08:29 PM
"When you talk of mineral oil, I assume you are talking engine oil, then that is a no-no as far as using on a
blade that will be used on foodstuff...."

NO! Mineral oil is a pharmaceutical commonly used as a laxative and is completely non-toxic and safe to use around food (you can't put enough on a knife to have a laxative effect).

"Because of its properties that prevent water absorption, combined with its lack of flavor and odor, food grade mineral oil is a popular preservative for wooden cutting boards, salad bowls and utensils. Rubbing a small amount of mineral oil into a wooden kitchen item periodically will prevent absorption of food odors and ease cleaning, as well as maintain the integrity of the wood, which is otherwise subjected to repeated wetting and drying in the course of use. The oil fills small surface cracks that may otherwise harbor bacteria." - excerpt from Wilipedia.

mohd
08-30-2012, 09:22 PM
.. I don't put anything on my knives that isn't food safe ..
The same here!
Normally I apply clove oil/olive oil/coconut oil/palm oil or a mix of clove oil with any one of them to my knives and then I wipe it to a near clean before storing them back.
One thing I like the aroma of clove oil on my knives.
I never try camellia oil and jojoba oil simply because both are not easily available here in my place.

mohd

tikkidaddy
08-30-2012, 09:27 PM
BALLISTOL while not edible works great on knives. Mineral oil based, it is bio-degradable once out of the can. Great for guns (not nickel finish though!), fishing reels etc...I use it on high carbon steel in leather where petroleum jelly is less desirable.
Leather "additives" like Lexol can petina carbon steel while knives are in the sheath overnight!

Ballistol and PJ wont do that. PJ can be applied in a medium coat, knife installed in leather and this treats parts of leather you cant see. Use Ballistol to remove buildup. BOTH have multiple survival/bushcraft uses...

tikkidaddy
08-30-2012, 09:38 PM
The same here!
Normally I apply clove oil/olive oil/coconut oil/palm oil or a mix of clove oil with any one of them to my knives and then I wipe it to a near clean before storing them back.
One thing I like the aroma of clove oil on my knives.
I never try camellia oil and jojoba oil simply because both are not easily available here in my place.

mohd

Didnt the ancient Japanese use clove oil on katanas? It is anti-bacterial...when u cut folks up, i bet germs could get involved....heh,heh,heh!

rdec
08-31-2012, 05:13 AM
While I'm thinking about it an old trick used by ship's carpenters of old to keep their tools from rusting was to put a small block of camphor in their tool box. The camphor vapor spreads through the box and deposits a thin layer on all surfaces within. It does work - the downside is that everything smells of camphor. If you live in a chronically humid area it is worth a try and a sight easier than cleaning surface rust every few days.

Some pharmacies sell block camphor - usually 2" x 2" x 1/2". Nowadays it comes wrapped in plastic. To use put a small cut in the wrapper and park in a corner. Replace when the wrapper is empty.

Scott Allen
08-31-2012, 06:52 AM
Food safe mineral oil is what I use on carbon steel knives and cast iron cookware. It won't go rancid.

Scott

MarcoMontana
08-31-2012, 07:27 AM
I filled the tiny oil bottle you get with a new razor with olive oil and keep it in my pack.

snapper
08-31-2012, 10:02 AM
I too have used olive oil but to be honest, cutting a lot of pepperoni works just as well and gives me something to eat! Nothing wrong with killing two birds with one stone; as the saying goes.

That's all for now. Take care and until next time...Be well.

snapper

MarcoMontana
08-31-2012, 10:14 AM
Great idea with pepperoni! Yummy too.....:20:

creature7
01-15-2014, 06:18 PM
frog lube

I'm wondering what could be a source for lube in the field? That's what I was searching for when finding this thread. Figured I'd mention frog lube as it's edible and made for metal.

jdm61
01-15-2014, 06:33 PM
From my experience with kitchen knives, most of the plant based oils that we commonly use, olive oil included, with go gummy and rancid after a while. Food grade mineral oil will not.

freebirdfb
01-15-2014, 06:43 PM
I use olive oil on my neck knife at least once a week. I like the idea of using food grade oils on knives that will be used for food. It is usually the easiest thing to grab instead of digging out vegetable oil. Anyways it performs as expected. I end up with a clean blade and a towel that is a little dirty.

W.Coulter45
01-15-2014, 06:54 PM
i use what ever cooking oil i have, mostly canola or peanut oil

Overgrown
01-15-2014, 06:56 PM
I use Olive oil on my kitchen knives including the Mora that I use in the kitchen.

Bush Otter
01-15-2014, 07:24 PM
I use a mix that I make of beeswax and food grade mineral oil .

Ranger John
01-15-2014, 07:29 PM
Try Ballistol oil. available at Rag Weed Forge. http://www.ragweedforge.com/SharpeningCatalog.html

Scratch4x4
01-15-2014, 07:35 PM
+1 for Balistol. I use it on all my knives, guns, and leather.

Sent from my SCH-I110 using Tapatalk 2

johnsonga
01-15-2014, 07:41 PM
Olive for axe handles /wood
Neatsfoot for sheaths /leather
Tuf Cloth for blades / metals
Brandy for self / friends

mangkukhan
01-15-2014, 07:49 PM
Mineral oil or wax only on my knives with the exception of one or two work specific blades like my leatherman which I'll use any oil sitting around at the moment I feel the need.

vdeal
01-15-2014, 09:02 PM
This whole idea of mineral oil being food safe is somewhat perplexing. I looked up mineral oil at Wikipedia and they state


A mineral oil is any of various colorless, odorless, light mixtures of alkanes in the C15 to C40 range from a non-vegetable (mineral) source, particularly a distillate of petroleum....Most often, mineral oil is a liquid by-product of the distillation of petroleum to produce gasoline and other petroleum-based products from crude oil. A mineral oil in this sense is a transparent, colorless oil composed mainly of alkanes and cyclic paraffins, related to petroleum jelly (also known as "white petrolatum"). It has a density of around 0.8 g/cm3. Mineral oil is a substance of relatively low value, and it is produced in very large quantities.

They also state:


The World Health Organization classifies untreated or mildly treated mineral oils as Group 1 carcinogens to humans; highly refined oils are classified as Group 3, meaning they are not suspected to be carcinogenic but available information is not sufficient to classify them as harmless.

And finally this:


Food grade mineral oil has an E number of E905a, although it is not approved in food products in the European Union, and incidental amounts in foods are carefully regulated. Because of its properties that prevent water absorption, combined with its lack of flavor and odor, food grade mineral oil is a popular preservative for wooden cutting boards, salad bowls and utensils. Rubbing a small amount of mineral oil into a wooden kitchen item periodically will prevent absorption of food odors and ease cleaning, as well as maintain the integrity of the wood, which is otherwise subjected to repeated wetting and drying in the course of use. The oil fills small surface cracks that may otherwise harbor bacteria.
Outside of the European Union, it is occasionally used in the food industry, particularly for candy. In this application, it is typically used for the glossy effect it produces, and to prevent the candy pieces from adhering to each other. It has been discouraged for use in children's foods, though it is still found in many candies, including Swedish Fish.

Doesn't really sound like something I want around food, period.

Shnick
01-15-2014, 09:06 PM
Yes olive oil is OK for knife blades.
You'd have to drink about 1000 gallons to worry about cancer from mineral oil...

vdeal
01-15-2014, 09:09 PM
Yes olive oil is OK for knife blades.
You'd have to drink about 1000 gallons to worry about cancer from mineral oil...

Ummm, source please. Sorry, but it's made from petroleum and I don't really like a side of gasoline by-products with my food.

Bush Hacker
01-15-2014, 09:44 PM
Personally, I'd worry more about dying from old age than a minute amount of mineral oil wiped on a blade. It works. A little goes a long way. Or just use your knife.