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Swink
09-08-2012, 05:04 PM
So Im am doing a lot of hunting this year and I was wondering if there are any animals that you cant eat, I know of coarse about deer and turkey... the obvious animals are fine to eat, But what about animals used mostly for their fur? Like Coyote and Bobcat? Things people dont usually eat. I dont believe in wasting any part of the animal So If I kill a "Fur bearer" Like Coyote and Bobcat, Can I still eat the meat? My grandfather told me that you cant eat an animal that eats meat? But he is very religious and I think that's just against his belief, I however am NOT religious and I want to know if they are safe to eat?

Panzer
09-08-2012, 05:06 PM
Meat is meat, and you got to eat.

oldsoldier
09-08-2012, 05:11 PM
Any animal is edible, but not all taste good. And, some can also carry disease, particularly in organs. My suggestion is to do your research based on your areas you plan to hunt. To the best of my recollection, the only meat to stay from are from carrion eaters-vultures, hyenas, et al.

Using my galaxy s2 via tapatalk, because I am too lazy to find a computer

TaigaTreader
09-08-2012, 05:13 PM
There are parts of the country where certain game have certain diseases, and if they show signs, I wouldn't eat them. CWD, Whirling disease, worms,... I would not consider eating most predators unless I were in dire straits... lions, wolves, yotes, coons (though many will disagree with me on that) and possums, muskrat, bottom feeding fish...

Crazysanman
09-08-2012, 05:15 PM
Bottom feeding fish? Flounder and catfish are awesome!

BushTramp
09-08-2012, 05:17 PM
Well you are religious if you believe in using every part of the animal, just a different religion.if you are hungry enough you can eat just about any animal but I have no problem leaving the carcasses of fur bearers right where I killed them to feed the other animals.i have gone back within days and they are always gone.we were taught in trappers school that that was the ethical thing to do.This thought that you need to use every part is a native belief and not something I aspire to

TaigaTreader
09-08-2012, 05:17 PM
Depends on the source... I'm not going to eat a fish if I'm not sure it hasn't been eating metropolitan junk in some swill its entire life. There are even trout streams around here you don't eat out of...

GreyOne
09-08-2012, 05:22 PM
Old time hunters considered both cougar and bear good eating.

riverjoe
09-08-2012, 05:42 PM
Euell used to say anything with fur . I spose anything with feathers , but Id have a real hard time with a Turkey Buzzard . Ive seen lots of dogs being grown for meat in the orient and I saw a show recently of a guy in India whos job was to trap rats which is also how he fed his family .

Juice
09-08-2012, 06:01 PM
Bear does taste good. So does raccoon and opossem. Pigeons they say are good too. Sometimes people get hang ups about food. But if you think about it we all eat stuff that might be gross. Like pigs.

Swink
09-08-2012, 06:10 PM
Yes you are right... I am religious, But I am Pagan while my grandfather is VERY Christian... I tend to try and stick to traditional beliefs of hunting.
Well you are religious if you believe in using every part of the animal, just a different religion.if you are hungry enough you can eat just about any animal but I have no problem leaving the carcasses of fur bearers right where I killed them to feed the other animals.i have gone back within days and they are always gone.we were taught in trappers school that that was the ethical thing to do.This thought that you need to use every part is a native belief and not something I aspire to

J.M.
09-08-2012, 06:16 PM
Like the old timer used to say, iffn it dont eat you......eat it! I think you can eat almost any animal, but as noted above do some research for your area to see what diseases may be present in the local critters.

Ned
09-08-2012, 06:24 PM
Bear does taste good. So does raccoon and opossem. Pigeons they say are good too. Sometimes people get hang ups about food. But if you think about it we all eat stuff that might be gross. Like pigs.

Exactly! People have hangups about 'possum since they have that rat tail, but how much nastier is a hairless, dookie eating pig, which few have qualms about eating?

Personally, I've had lots of 'possum and love it. What easier prey is there than an animal who plays dead when it sees you? Lol! I'm sure bears love people who do that, too. Haha.

Youcantreadinthedark
09-08-2012, 06:37 PM
Our food sources are much more informed by cultural history than anything biological; the only animals I won't (or wouldn't) eat would be those, like some have mentioned, that have ingested synthetic food, herbicides, pesticides, et al. Muskrat is a delicacy around a lot of the Chesapeake, and I'm sure further north as well. Learn about CWD, whirling disease (which is really on the downslope these days), intestinal worms, botflies, etc before you eat anything at all in the wild. If you're squeamish, go read about what's in a big mac, and then decide if a free-range, organically fed 'possum doesn't sound a lot more appetizing than that. For that matter, read about any high-volume feed lot operation and see if you don't wince.
Traditionally, the entire Judaic and Islamic religions, along with others less well known, have qualms about eating pigs. Lots of culinary strictures are built into religions as disease-prevention failsafes.

Howie
09-08-2012, 06:43 PM
their all edible, just some is better than others.

One Eyed Mule
09-08-2012, 06:44 PM
Bear taste great, my favorite meat to eat. Most all meats carry different dangerous stuff, just need to understand how to cook it properly. Chicken and pork are some of the worse at carrying stuff.

66c10
09-08-2012, 06:58 PM
Yes you are right... I am religious, But I am Pagan while my grandfather is VERY Christian... I tend to try and stick to traditional beliefs of hunting.

I think ethics of killing animals has more to do with purpose. If I killed a deer for meat, my ethics would lead me to make an effort to harvest everything edible. I personally don't do leather work and unless I specifically know of someone that wants the hide, I have no problem leaving it there. I made a clean kill to harvest an animal for meat, I'm not going to figure a way to use the bones out of some misplaced guilt. If I spend the afternoon turning prairie dogs inside out with a 6mm Rem, because they were digging dangerous holes in a pasture, I'm not risking their fleas to figure out a way to make them taste good. Nature will see to it that nothing is wasted.

I also take exception to the idea of not wasting being a native one. Primitive societies didn't really have a choice. They had to make do with the resources provided. Shortly after acquiring horses, many American Indian tribes adopted a the "surround" method of hunting Bison. Used by the Cree, Cheyennes, Arapahoes, Sioux, Pawnees, Ornabas, and probably many other tribes. Whole herds were captured and slaughtered with much going to waste. Catlin documented "in the space of fifteen minutes resulted in the total destruction of the whole herd". Supposedly more than 50% rotted in that particular instance, because it was the easiest method.

OLD DOG
09-08-2012, 07:02 PM
I know a fellow who tried coyote - once. This guy isn't a bit fussy about what he eats, but he claims it can't be done. I've eaten cougar, and plenty of bear. Both are good. Never tried bobcat, but I've heard the Chinese make something out of it. Never tried coon or possum, but many a southern family was raised on it. I'm game to try just about anything, at least once.

Kentucky
09-08-2012, 07:06 PM
When it comes to wild meat bacon and Sweet taters' make everything taste good :32: Possum,groundhog,coon,mushrat, any of it..

chaindrivecharlie
09-08-2012, 07:16 PM
I growed up in Florida, we ate just about anything except, Buzzards!

tiny80022
09-08-2012, 07:21 PM
Mountain men said if it crawls, swims, or flies, eat it. They preferred mt. Lion the most, it's said to be nice and sweet.

santaman2000
09-08-2012, 07:27 PM
So Im am doing a lot of hunting this year and I was wondering if there are any animals that you cant eat, I know of coarse about deer and turkey... the obvious animals are fine to eat, But what about animals used mostly for their fur? Like Coyote and Bobcat? Things people dont usually eat. I dont believe in wasting any part of the animal So If I kill a "Fur bearer" Like Coyote and Bobcat, Can I still eat the meat? My grandfather told me that you cant eat an animal that eats meat? But he is very religious and I think that's just against his belief, I however am NOT religious and I want to know if they are safe to eat?

So your grandfather doesn't eat pork. Pigs eat lots of meat. And he doesn't eat chicken. Chickens eat lots og bugs and worms (at least free range chickens do)

Swink
09-08-2012, 07:29 PM
Well he does that doesn't make sense... All I know is he said was carnivores shouldn't have been eaten but I dont believe the same things he does.
So your grandfather doesn't eat pork. Pigs eat lots of meat. And he doesn't eat chicken. Chickens eat lots og bugs and worms (at least free range chickens do)

PMSteve
09-08-2012, 09:39 PM
I know a fellow who tried coyote - once. This guy isn't a bit fussy about what he eats, but he claims it can't be done. I've eaten cougar, and plenty of bear. Both are good. Never tried bobcat, but I've heard the Chinese make something out of it. Never tried coon or possum, but many a southern family was raised on it. I'm game to try just about anything, at least once.

A guy I worked with would bring a bunch of homemade jerky to work and everyone would eat it and leave him very little.

A few weeks later he found a road killed Coyote that was fairly fresh. He made jerky from that and set it out on his desk. Most everyone in the office ate some and raved about the taste. No one got sick until he told a few what it was - then it was just the thought of eating road-kill that they objected to.

Any fur-bearing animal is okay to eat. Just make sure any non-game animal meat is thoroughly cooked.

Steve

Keyser Söze
09-08-2012, 09:55 PM
You can Only eat dead animals
:20:
Road Kill deer sausage , made by Knight , he told us before he cooked them that is road kill deer....best sausage i had in a long time...

http://i636.photobucket.com/albums/uu90/gagalmg/BC-USA%202010%20Missouri%20meet/DSCN0293.jpg

http://i636.photobucket.com/albums/uu90/gagalmg/BC-USA%202010%20Missouri%20meet/DSCN0298.jpg

draco
09-08-2012, 10:01 PM
As far as I know only some amphibians and fish are actually poisonous and those are mostly in the tropics. As a kid I ate pretty much anything. Snakes are okay. Opossum and coon sucks IMO. Woodchucks are great. Crow sucks. Pigeons are great. Turtles are great. I'm not a fan of frog legs but many people seem to like them. I can't think of anything else that was not the normal game I have eaten.

cootdude
09-08-2012, 11:27 PM
so I have eaten: Peacock,guinea hen,bear,frog legs,rattle snake,raccoon and Coyote which was quite good. None were bad.

briarbrow
09-08-2012, 11:42 PM
I could make a fairly long list of ones i feel squimish toward but then still occasionally eat at mcdonalds- it is a character flaw

Ned
09-08-2012, 11:49 PM
I could make a fairly long list of ones i feel squimish toward but then still occasionally eat at mcdonalds- it is a character flaw

Ah so you eat worm meat then, huh?

briarbrow
09-09-2012, 12:05 AM
im sure that is the least of it Ned

jack459
09-09-2012, 12:58 AM
I know some guys who swear that coyote backstraps are better than venison..Got to have my catfish, bottomfeeder or not.

Blueraja
09-09-2012, 01:11 AM
Euell used to say anything with fur . I spose anything with feathers , but Id have a real hard time with a Turkey Buzzard . Ive seen lots of dogs being grown for meat in the orient and I saw a show recently of a guy in India whos job was to trap rats which is also how he fed his family .

Hey! I saw that show too! Didn't he smoke them out of their holes?

Blueraja
09-09-2012, 01:20 AM
Alligator is good, and so is fish. Both eat meat. I've heard that we (humans) are to mainly eat animals with hooves.

Blueraja
09-09-2012, 01:21 AM
You can Only eat dead animals
:20:
Road Kill deer sausage , made by Knight , he told us before he cooked them that is road kill deer....best sausage i had in a long time...

http://i636.photobucket.com/albums/uu90/gagalmg/BC-USA%202010%20Missouri%20meet/DSCN0293.jpg

http://i636.photobucket.com/albums/uu90/gagalmg/BC-USA%202010%20Missouri%20meet/DSCN0298.jpg

I would totally eat that.

bigcknott88
09-09-2012, 01:40 AM
I grew up on raodkill deer. I actually aasked my wife tonight if she would ever eat fresh roadkill. I thought she was gonna be sick. I told the guys I work with about eating mountain oysters thought they were gonna be sick. I've eaten gator, snake, possum coon deer elk bison never had frog. I'm willing to try anything once sometimes twice. Meat is meat although I don't eat chicken and only wild hog unless its hotdog.

Blueraja
09-09-2012, 02:18 AM
I grew up on raodkill deer. I actually aasked my wife tonight if she would ever eat fresh roadkill. I thought she was gonna be sick. I told the guys I work with about eating mountain oysters thought they were gonna be sick. I've eaten gator, snake, possum coon deer elk bison never had frog. I'm willing to try anything once sometimes twice. Meat is meat although I don't eat chicken and only wild hog unless its hotdog.

My first experience with ground venison was from a coworker's husband that had a freshly hit deer processed. Of course, she failed to mention that until after I ate it! However, it was very tasty, and wouldn't hesitate to eat it again.

Frog legs are really good! They're like chicken wings, but just a tad more chewy. I let the sit in saltwater in the fridge overnight, then dredge them in Andy's Cajun seasoning, and fry them. Very good!

snappydog357
09-09-2012, 03:17 AM
If you can kill it eat it. I have found Racoon to be very good. It's a little greasy but tastes alot like roast beef. squirrel, deer, beaver, rabbit, dove , quail, and pheasant are all real good. I have not had coyote. It is in the canine family but health wise I don't see any reason why you could not eat it.

Juice
09-09-2012, 07:12 AM
A guy I worked with would bring a bunch of homemade jerky to work and everyone would eat it and leave him very little.

A few weeks later he found a road killed Coyote that was fairly fresh. He made jerky from that and set it out on his desk. Most everyone in the office ate some and raved about the taste. No one got sick until he told a few what it was - then it was just the thought of eating road-kill that they objected to.

Any fur-bearing animal is okay to eat. Just make sure any non-game animal meat is thoroughly cooked.

Steve

I think that is the ticket, thoroughly cooked. If it is cooked all the way, and the meat is fresh I think most of the time there will be no problem.

Panzer
09-09-2012, 07:50 AM
Swink, how much hunting have you done? I ask because the question you ask indicates you have not been around hunting much. If that's the case then I encourage you to study your states hunting laws and even enroll in a hunter safety course. Even the hunting magazine have good basic info, or better yet pick up some vintage hunting books. Good luck!

cobbsteve14
09-09-2012, 09:50 AM
As long as you bring the internal temp up to 160 degrees or 180 degrees at anything above 6000 ft you will kill anything in it. Like my old bumper sticker use to say "I believe theres a place in the world for all of God's creatures. Right next to the mashed potato's and gravy."

Swink
09-09-2012, 09:55 AM
This will be my first year hunting and yes I have taken the coarse, Ive been around hunting my whole life just this is my first year, I have everything to go and I am legal with my orange card and license
Swink, how much hunting have you done? I ask because the question you ask indicates you have not been around hunting much. If that's the case then I encourage you to study your states hunting laws and even enroll in a hunter safety course. Even the hunting magazine have good basic info, or better yet pick up some vintage hunting books. Good luck!

cobra
09-09-2012, 10:03 AM
I believe theres a place in the world for all of God's creatures. Right next to the mashed potato's and gravy.

+10 - this is epic.

-Jeremy

Shnick
09-09-2012, 10:04 AM
Strangest thing I've eaten would be Porcupine. Come complete with toothpicks...LOL

Mostly anything you can eat, of course it has to be a healthy animal and you'll have to get over the gag factor.
Anything that feeds on carrion should be avoided...
ya never know

Bjorno
09-09-2012, 10:30 AM
Pretty much anything that is alive is edible, save for the obvious, but whether or not you want to eat it depends on many factors. Being a meat eater does not mean you should not eat the animal... You eat fish all the time and most that are large enough to eat also eat other fish.

Biomagnification is the biggest concern I would have with consuming predatory animals, other than disease. Depending on the diet, many animals could have large doses of harmful substances in their system from eating a large amount of smaller organisms that are contaminated with things like Mercury and other toxic metals. This is more prevalent in fish than other animals

Ideally, you are going to want to be aware of what their diet is and what the diet of their diet is... so on and so forth. That takes a lot of research, which is why you see people who tend to eat only herbivores because there is just too much you need to know when eating carnivores if you intend to eat a lot of them

If you are eating a meat eater from a nature preserve, or somewhere where the concern for contamination of their food source is unlikely, then I see no reason why you should not eat them as long as they show no signs of illness or parasites.

Carrion eaters... Catfish are technically carrion eaters and they are mighty tasty. But I can't imagine a buzzard tasting good.

riverjoe
09-09-2012, 10:30 AM
Lets not forget the Donner Party .

HeavyMetals9
09-09-2012, 10:41 AM
Oh man that looks great. Made me hungry just seeing the pic. I personally am up to try anything once, maybe twice lol. Cook it correctly and thoroughly. Most people say animals cant be eaten cuz it may taste funny or bad to them. To each their own.

You can Only eat dead animals
:20:
Road Kill deer sausage , made by Knight , he told us before he cooked them that is road kill deer....best sausage i had in a long time...

http://i636.photobucket.com/albums/uu90/gagalmg/BC-USA%202010%20Missouri%20meet/DSCN0293.jpg

http://i636.photobucket.com/albums/uu90/gagalmg/BC-USA%202010%20Missouri%20meet/DSCN0298.jpg

Newt
09-09-2012, 11:13 AM
There *are* examples of things you cannot eat.

Sealife has several on the inedible menu...for example Fugu. It contains a neurotoxin that *will* kill you if you eat certain parts of them. Even when prepared by very highly trained and licensed specialists, one of the thrills of eating it is the numbing effect on the lips and tongue.

As for land critters, Polar Bear liver contains extremely high levels of vitamin A...in fact, toxic levels to humans.

Stick with common stuff until you are more experienced. Some parasites and diseases can be almost impossible to recognize.

FWIW, I have even eaten domestic dog (it's a long story that occurred overseas a long time ago.

Swink
09-09-2012, 11:29 AM
TI have even eaten domestic dog (it's a long story that occurred overseas a long time ago.

Was it tasty? I'm a prepper and you never know what annoying neighborhood animals will make a tasty dinner

Jakuka
09-09-2012, 11:42 AM
Okay guys this thread has the potential to be very helpful. However, I am still hearing a continuing theme of mixed messages that often leaves me more confused than when I first started looking for answers. Some say you can eat anything that moves as long as it's thoroughly cooked. Others say you need to be careful about diseases, parasites, and worms- or is this just a difference between what may be someone's personal preference on what they consider acceptable table fare versus what can actually be eaten without consequences to your health afterwards. To give an example, there are many in my area that hunt and eat coons, while there are others that say the high percentage of rabies infection in our local populations make it a risky thing to consume. I am fully knowledgeable about anything that swims but I could definitely use clarification on some of these other critters. Thanks for your help!

zero40484
09-09-2012, 11:48 AM
Just don't start eating "long pig" and every think will be cool


I'm sorry just ignore me I couldn't keep that out burst in

bharen
09-09-2012, 12:19 PM
Personally I think the advice to stick to eating the major game animals in the US is good. Sure there's lots of uncommon stuff that may be quite tasty - muskrat, woodchuck, cougar, beaver, porcupine, etc. - but the major game animal kills (deer, turkey, wild boar, rabbit, squirrel, etc.) are regularly tested for disease by most state game agencies. This doesn't mean the game is disease free, just that the common pathogens are well known and safe handling, processing and cooking procedures are established and understood.

PMSteve
09-09-2012, 01:06 PM
Just recalled...

When I was in Viet Nam I and a bunch of other guys were invited to eat at this one villiage. The main (and only) course was what we called "Rats and Rice" with nukmam. MMMmmmmm!

Nukmam is a fish sauce that is made by stuffing fish bits (heads, guts, scales, tails) into a glass bottle and left in the sun for a month or so until it all liquifies and ferments. It's NOT ketchup by any means. Westerners can't keep it down for very long.

Steve

riverjoe
09-09-2012, 01:58 PM
Just recalled...

When I was in Viet Nam I and a bunch of other guys were invited to eat at this one villiage. The main (and only) course was what we called "Rats and Rice" with nukmam. MMMmmmmm!

Nukmam is a fish sauce that is made by stuffing fish bits (heads, guts, scales, tails) into a glass bottle and left in the sun for a month or so until it all liquifies and ferments. It's NOT ketchup by any means. Westerners can't keep it down for very long.

Steve

Remember the giant bird eating centipedes . I saw a show recently with a Viet guy stir frying those 12 inch dudes and wolfing em down . Yes I said 12 inch the books lie when they say 8 or 9 inch .

Ed
09-09-2012, 02:25 PM
I saw the title and thought: "Whichever ones get close enough to me"

I've eaten just about every game animal and furbearer you can think of from starlings to buffalo. Only thing I didn't like was coon. I've heard that coon can be quite good if you cook it right, but I guess I didn't cook it right LOL

Ed

draco
09-09-2012, 04:56 PM
Okay guys this thread has the potential to be very helpful. However, I am still hearing a continuing theme of mixed messages that often leaves me more confused than when I first started looking for answers. Some say you can eat anything that moves as long as it's thoroughly cooked. Others say you need to be careful about diseases, parasites, and worms- or is this just a difference between what may be someone's personal preference on what they consider acceptable table fare versus what can actually be eaten without consequences to your health afterwards. To give an example, there are many in my area that hunt and eat coons, while there are others that say the high percentage of rabies infection in our local populations make it a risky thing to consume. I am fully knowledgeable about anything that swims but I could definitely use clarification on some of these other critters. Thanks for your help!

To actually answer your question if the meat is FULLY cooked rabies and parasites will be killed and not a problem. I don't know of any fur bearing animal that can not be eaten (even the cute ones.) But remember if you come into contact with even a dead rabies infected animals saliva you could also get rabies. I would not want to take that chance myself. If an animal is foaming from the mouth and acting crazy I would kill it but not touch it.

One other thing to be aware of right now is Bubonic plague. You get that from fleas of mostly small rodents so I would not deal with squirrels or other rodents if I lived in a place like Colorado. At least not during the summer months.

But with that said infections from animals like that are extremely rare and are not really anything I concern myself much with.

Grey Ranger
09-09-2012, 05:45 PM
Here is article from Wikipedia about poisonous mammals. There are a few animals that are dangerous to eat because they are venomous, but i dont believe there is any mammal in the world whose actual meaty flesh is poisonous.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Venomous_mammals

Doubletap
09-09-2012, 06:12 PM
I have also had dog and cat wasnt bad both kinda stringy my favorite meet is horse. I was in a restaurant in GRand Cayman that served all kind of exotic animals from Graffias to lion meat it kinda all taste like what you season it with



Was it tasty? I'm a prepper and you never know what annoying neighborhood animals will make a tasty dinner

Tennesseeminer
09-09-2012, 07:09 PM
Any thing that walks or crawls or fly's:

Shnick
09-09-2012, 07:36 PM
Here is article from Wikipedia about poisonous mammals. There are a few animals that are dangerous to eat because they are venomous, but i dont believe there is any mammal in the world whose actual meaty flesh is poisonous.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Venomous_mammals

The egg sacs from Gar can make you sick, if not outright poisonous.
Various internet sources say they contain a tetrodotoxin.
Not sure what that is but it don't sound too good.
The rest is OK to eat, I just stick with the backstraps...

barnes3126
09-09-2012, 07:42 PM
If-in it wern't ment to eat;
It wouldn't be made of meat;

I draw the line at cats and possum.

nothinghead
09-09-2012, 07:59 PM
Only deer I got last year was a road kill. Nothing wrong with that for sure, as long as you are smart about it.


You can Only eat dead animals
:20:
Road Kill deer sausage , made by Knight , he told us before he cooked them that is road kill deer....best sausage i had in a long time...

http://i636.photobucket.com/albums/uu90/gagalmg/BC-USA%202010%20Missouri%20meet/DSCN0293.jpg

http://i636.photobucket.com/albums/uu90/gagalmg/BC-USA%202010%20Missouri%20meet/DSCN0298.jpg

Wyndigo
09-09-2012, 10:37 PM
I've eaten a variety of animals and fish over the years, IF I were hungry enough I'd probably eat cat/dog/etc.
Thing is,here in the USA we made pets of alot of animals that people in third world countries think nothing of eating.
Just a state of mind is all :)

bearhunter2
09-09-2012, 11:25 PM
Mountain men said if it crawls, swims, or flies, eat it. They preferred mt. Lion the most, it's said to be nice and sweet.
There are a lot of lion hunters out here that say mountain lion is some of the best, sweetest meat anyone could ever eat. I have seen many lions, but have never eaten them.
I sure would though if I get the chance.

I had porcupine jerky once. It was actually very good. The meat was almost white.

DeriusT
09-10-2012, 01:22 AM
All NA birds are edible, and really anything that bears fur, and a fair amount of bugs, grubs, worms, larva, ect. I have eaten some things that a vast majority of people would find very disturbing in my day.

I would caution that you read up on diseases that fur bearers carry, and educate yourself on the other "unconventional" options I mentioned, as some are poisonous. You are safe with all birds and fur bearers though, barring disease.
(and most diseases and parasites are negated through proper cooking)

Ned
09-10-2012, 02:55 AM
FWIW, I have even eaten domestic dog (it's a long story that occurred overseas a long time ago.

Was it tasty? I'm a prepper and you never know what annoying neighborhood animals will make a tasty dinner

Dude, I live in Chinatown. They've found dogs on the meat hooks of our favorite restaurants. Tastes just like the rest of the meat they serve.

Ned
09-10-2012, 02:57 AM
All NA birds are edible, and really anything that bears fur, and a fair amount of bugs, grubs, worms, larva, ect. I have eaten some things that a vast majority of people would find very disturbing in my day.


I'm not big on eating most bugs (especially not grubs or larva!) but I do love a good grasshopper or cricket, or a big beetle. I like 'em crisp and juicy.

In other countries I've had plates piled full of roast crickets. Good eatin'!

But the real beauty of 'em is that they're just as good eaten live and squirming. No preparation necessary, and they keep themselves very clean. If you're quick with your hands you can just grab and eat. I've surprised people while standing in conversation then snatching a big grasshopper off the wall beside them and chomping down without skipping a beat. Of course I would never do that to anyone who doesn't know me really well and are like-minded survivalists, lol!

If you can get past the psychological block of eating a live bug, you'll find that they have a very sweet, delicious taste (at least the ones I'm familiar with, like grasshoppers and beetles). The soft squishy ones are still too much for me to stomach (even though I swallow raw oysters - go figure, right?), so I have no clue what things like worms (besides eating at McDonalds) or grubs taste like. Oh, but they do catch delicious fish... ;)

Newt
09-10-2012, 05:34 AM
lol...I can't believe how many folks here go all out about water purification yet even after I posted factual information about the toxicity of polar bear livers, continued to talk about "all good with enough gravy".

If there is even one solid example of toxic food, one would think it would prompt serious thought about what else needs to be learned.

Be very careful about what you choose to believe on the internet.


ps: The dog meat was sweet.

bearhunter2
09-10-2012, 10:11 AM
On of my best friends is married to a Korean gal, she grew up eating dogs and cats, which is very common there.
When they come to visit I jokingly tell her not to get any ideals about our beagles :D

Ned
09-10-2012, 10:26 AM
lol...I can't believe how many folks here go all out about water purification yet even after I posted factual information about the toxicity of polar bear livers, continued to talk about "all good with enough gravy".

If there is even one solid example of toxic food, one would think it would prompt serious thought about what else needs to be learned.

Be very careful about what you choose to believe on the internet.

Another one to be careful with is jackrabbit (cottontails are great!) in many areas, as they can carry worms.

leaf and lightning
09-11-2012, 10:10 AM
I have inadvertently eaten dog(didn't know what I was ordering), and though I felt sick once I found out what I had eaten, I will say it didn't taste bad at all... the nausea was purely a psychological reaction, not a physical one... I imagine that coyote and fox would be about the same, though I still think I would have to be real hungry to consciously overcome that psychological barrier... but I don't hunt those species, so not an issue...

Keyser Söze
09-11-2012, 10:19 AM
their all edible, just some is better than others.

i might ad...well done meat-ad salt pepper-and garlic ,if you like garlic then all meat will taste like garlic , salt and garlic will act as a beneficial bacteria shield in your stomach , also charcoal -is good for Ya !

268bull
09-11-2012, 10:48 AM
Back in '72 - '73 I was on a detail with the Navy in a place we weren't on the best of terms with. The indigenous weren't, apparently, on the best of terms with there country either. We ate a lot of what the locals ate. I don't know what exactly that was most of the time, but it was meat, they seasoned it well, and it went and stayed down good. Like many have already said, you have to eat. I too, though would stay away ffrom the lower predatory forms, coyote, possum', skunk. My policy since has been, unless it's showing obvious signs of being sick or rabid, if I'm not planning on eating it, why shoot it? I did know a local family, when I was a young boy, that would stay in the woods all day with a box of 50, .22 shorts, and go home with a sack full of chipmunks. I never accepted a dinner invite to their table, but they were in a tough spot in life, so they made due!! Bear are omnivourous ( diet of either herbaceous or meat, hogs are also, but we eat pork ). ( think of that, wild boar your hunting not only recognize you as a predator, but you, as a possible meal for them! )

EdD270
09-11-2012, 04:19 PM
Nearly all animals can be eaten and all birds can be eaten. That means if you eat them they will give you nourishment and not poison you, It does not mean they taste good.
Lewis & Clark found the best tasting meat to be cats (mountain lions, bobcats, lynx, etc.) and dog (wolf, coyote, etc.). Their men liked them better than deer or elk or sheep. Squirrel, rabbit, mouse, rat, gopher, beaver, otter, muskrat, marmot or groundhog, racoon, possum, bear, and many other animals are very good to eat, and usually easier to bag than larger animals like deer and elk. Actually, for bushcrafting and survival, smaller animals are better since they take less work to catch and process and cook, and there's no large "left over" carcass to attract large predators, like bear and lion.

Wyndigo
09-12-2012, 10:28 PM
by the way, you florida people (my home state) that fish, if you catch what most call mudfish, EAT them, they are great!

DeriusT
09-12-2012, 10:39 PM
I'm not big on eating most bugs (especially not grubs or larva!) but I do love a good grasshopper or cricket, or a big beetle. I like 'em crisp and juicy.

In other countries I've had plates piled full of roast crickets. Good eatin'!

But the real beauty of 'em is that they're just as good eaten live and squirming. No preparation necessary, and they keep themselves very clean. If you're quick with your hands you can just grab and eat. I've surprised people while standing in conversation then snatching a big grasshopper off the wall beside them and chomping down without skipping a beat. Of course I would never do that to anyone who doesn't know me really well and are like-minded survivalists, lol!

If you can get past the psychological block of eating a live bug, you'll find that they have a very sweet, delicious taste (at least the ones I'm familiar with, like grasshoppers and beetles). The soft squishy ones are still too much for me to stomach (even though I swallow raw oysters - go figure, right?), so I have no clue what things like worms (besides eating at McDonalds) or grubs taste like. Oh, but they do catch delicious fish... ;)

Wow that's cool! I had heard that all grasshoppers had to be cooked due to the parasites they carry in their intestines? I guess that's not true?

harvester-red
09-12-2012, 10:52 PM
if it's got four legs and is slower / stupider than me it is edible

santa
09-12-2012, 11:24 PM
grandfather came home from the first world war, 30 or so years later he started to talk about it. as a six or seven year old i learned about trench cuisine listening from around the corner as the adults talked. learned that eating rats can keep you alive and the offerings in german pow camps make for some culturally unacceptible choices. since then i've eaten most every thing mentioned in this thread. preparation, preparation. cook it well, keep clean, stay healthy. if you have doubts - don't

Keyser Söze
09-12-2012, 11:29 PM
if it's got four legs and is slower / stupider than me it is edible

so you like :Turtle ? lmao

harvester-red
09-12-2012, 11:32 PM
makes a good stew!

mahaney
09-18-2012, 08:50 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CMNry4PE93Y



so does he....

J

Swamplife
09-19-2012, 09:53 PM
The only animals in the mammal/bird/reptile/fish category that aren't really edible are mustelids (weasel family), vulpines (foxes), sea ducks-mergansers-loons, too many fish to name. I don't know of anyone who has tried skunk, but I know that dogs won't even eat weasels and foxes. Cats, coyotes, wolves, domestic dog are all good to go, as are raccoons if cooked right. Large male wild boar aren't too good, I don't know why all these yahoos shoot them all the time. And they stink, bad.

Ned
09-19-2012, 10:04 PM
I don't know of anyone who has tried skunk

I haven't myself but know many who have. As long as you know how to take their scent glands out, they're supposed to be good eatin'!

I accidentally snared one once by mistake. I had a hell of a time releasing him from the snare! Yes, I got sprayed. I can't remember how I eventually got him loose, or how I managed to get cleaned off. I just remember it was a big hassle.

thewildroseforever
09-19-2012, 11:21 PM
Bottom feeding fish? Flounder and catfish are awesome!

I beg to differ
I don't like flounder at all! by the time we cleaned them which seems to take a heck of a lot longer than other fish (trout salmon) we didn't like the meat at all.

not trying to be a pain or anything I'm just giving my opinion

bearhunter2
09-19-2012, 11:25 PM
Ah man, flounder is delicious. I use to go down to the 'redneck Rivera' every summer and go 'floundering'.
We would fry those suckers up in beer batter... Delicious!

pap11y
09-19-2012, 11:55 PM
The most unusual foods I have eaten is grasshoppers, worms and moths.

I'll have a go at any meats.

I did see something mentioned about a disease in mice and rats intestines that is dangerous for humans. It was highlighted by a guy using stone drop traps and the pretty much flattened the mice.

I think they are fine if internals removed but can't remember the specifics.

I had also heard or read wild pig is iffy because of worms and other parasites... but I don't know how valid this is..

ppine
09-20-2012, 10:46 AM
You can eat almost anything, but some are better than others. In order of palatibility (highest first)- moose, elk, bison, sheep, caribou, bear, and deer. Some like mountain lion. Bears vary a lot depending on their diet. Porcupines, rabbits, rodents, and many others will do in a pinch.

A famous story told to me by a friend that was a wildlife biologist working in the Yakutat Delta of Alaska. They were hired to do some waterfowl surveys one summer and ran into the US Fish and Wildlife agents many times. Around the campfire one night some agents showed up for a social call and they decided to have some fun. My friend asked his buddy "Have you ever tried owl in a stew?" "Yeah" he said. "It tastes a lot like eagle."

Swamplife
09-20-2012, 07:15 PM
You can eat almost anything, but some are better than others. In order of palatibility (highest first)- moose, elk, bison, sheep, caribou, bear, and deer. Some like mountain lion. Bears vary a lot depending on their diet. Porcupines, rabbits, rodents, and many others will do in a pinch.

A famous story told to me by a friend that was a wildlife biologist working in the Yakutat Delat of Alaska. They were hired to do some waterfowl surveys one summer and ran into the US Fish and Wildlife agents many times. Around the campfire one night some agents showed up for a social call and they decided to have some fun. My friend asked his buddy "Have you ever tried owl in a stew?" "Yeah" he said. "It tastes a lot like eagle."

Porcupine is pretty good if you cook it "right". I used to put it in the barrel stove after the fire was down to just coals. Rabbit is always good, except for jackrabbits. NEVER waste your time with owls, they are all feathers with the body of a small grouse in there somewhere.

ppine
10-05-2012, 12:45 PM
Swamp,
I met a guy last week that was part Ojibwa from the UP of Michigan. He mentioned an old guy outside of town that was a Cree. He ate 'big-eyed chicks" fairly often but said they weren't very good. It is still illegal to kill pocupines in the Far North because they are one of the few animals a man can kill with a stick in a survival situation.

crookedknife
10-05-2012, 02:10 PM
I just finished reading the journals of Alexander Mackenzie - they ate fox, wolves and even eagles. I've eaten some sea birds that tasted like really old fish - can't imagine what an eagle would taste like.

IKE_SC
10-05-2012, 02:23 PM
squirrel and rabbit are always great!

Atkins72
10-05-2012, 03:15 PM
My take on it is simple:
Genesis 9:2-3

"The fear and dread of you will fall on all the beasts of the earth, and on all the birds in the sky, on every creature that moves along the ground, and on all the fish in the sea; they are given into your hands. 3 Everything that lives and moves about will be food for you. Just as I gave you the green plants, I now give you everything."

Swamplife
10-05-2012, 06:35 PM
Swamp,
I met a guy last week that was part Ojibwa from the UP of Michigan. He mentioned an old guy outside of town that was a Cree. He ate 'big-eyed chicks" fairly often but said they weren't very good. It is still illegal to kill pocupines in the Far North because they are one of the few animals a man can kill with a stick in a survival situation.

Never heard of that, I have shot at least ten of them (porc's) for food in AK. Like Spruce grouse, they taste better when it is not winter.

riverjoe
10-05-2012, 09:01 PM
I know in the 1800s they sold song birds at the groceries . Every time I go down in the woods in the fall the Robins sure do act like game birds . They flock up down there and then flush just as if they think of themselves as edible . When you think about it there not really much smaller then a Timberdoodle or a Snipe . But no , that would be wrong even tho there are thousands of them around here .

WindWalker
10-05-2012, 11:21 PM
NEVER waste your time with owls, they are all feathers with the body of a small grouse in there somewhere.
Some of our Owls up here are of a very good size with large slabs of white breast meat. Guess it just depends on where you live and which specie are available.
Best Wishes

Jonathan Cooke
10-05-2012, 11:33 PM
I have ate raw beaver liver and heart before right after a kill. I must say not to bad.

Keyser Söze
10-06-2012, 12:14 AM
i have eaten Escargots a la Bourguignonne many times, also frog legs many many times -very good stuff , also ate carp caviar Tarama Krinos , gold fish , pigeons -very good --, nutria -sausage- is the bomb , cow stomach stew is tha bomb, horse meat is super duper in salamis , my granpa ate dog and cat in wwII

Bad Hand
10-06-2012, 12:17 AM
I have eaten lion and it is great. I wouldn't even try to eat a coyote they smell real bad even fresh skinned.

Fangofthedead
10-06-2012, 02:34 AM
In my experience, bear is delicious. In a roast with veggies you have a hard time telling it from high dollar beef.


Old time hunters considered both cougar and bear good eating.

riverjoe
10-06-2012, 06:48 AM
i have eaten Escargots a la Bourguignonne many times, also frog legs many many times -very good stuff , also ate carp caviar Tarama Krinos , gold fish , pigeons -very good --, nutria -sausage- is the bomb , cow stomach stew is tha bomb, horse meat is super duper in salamis , my granpa ate dog and cat in wwII

No Gar eggs ?

dogonlynose
10-06-2012, 10:13 AM
Any of the SC folks know if they still have the chitlin strut? Once......only once. I swear it's just one step below balut though.

ppine
10-08-2012, 10:22 AM
Swamplife,
Glad to hear from Alaskans. It may only be in Canada that the porcupine law is in effect, Yukon, BC, and NWT.

The real answer to this thread is "How hungry are you?"

all feng no shui
12-17-2012, 10:33 PM
I think ethics of killing animals has more to do with purpose. If I killed a deer for meat, my ethics would lead me to make an effort to harvest everything edible. I personally don't do leather work and unless I specifically know of someone that wants the hide, I have no problem leaving it there. I made a clean kill to harvest an animal for meat, I'm not going to figure a way to use the bones out of some misplaced guilt. If I spend the afternoon turning prairie dogs inside out with a 6mm Rem, because they were digging dangerous holes in a pasture, I'm not risking their fleas to figure out a way to make them taste good. Nature will see to it that nothing is wasted.

I also take exception to the idea of not wasting being a native one. Primitive societies didn't really have a choice. They had to make do with the resources provided. Shortly after acquiring horses, many American Indian tribes adopted a the "surround" method of hunting Bison. Used by the Cree, Cheyennes, Arapahoes, Sioux, Pawnees, Ornabas, and probably many other tribes. Whole herds were captured and slaughtered with much going to waste. Catlin documented "in the space of fifteen minutes resulted in the total destruction of the whole herd". Supposedly more than 50% rotted in that particular instance, because it was the easiest method.

No culture is more efficient at total use of the animal than the current American culture. Every part of an animal produced for food in this country is used. If not for food than for protein for other animals in the supply chain. The "noble savage" has been mythologized to such an extent in the US while most of the "myth" is unsubstantiated. DG

Loogaroo
12-17-2012, 10:45 PM
I was told Polar bear is a bad idea to eat. Something about the vitamin K, A, D, and E overdose makes you go blind. Some sources say it's just the liver though.

mongo
12-17-2012, 11:05 PM
Another one to be careful with is jackrabbit (cottontails are great!) in many areas, as they can carry worms.

The main thing to worry about with rabbits is Tularemia. Caused by a bacteria, Fransciella tularensis, I believe. (It's been a long time since I needed to know that...) If the liver is spotted, do not eat it. In fact, I have heard that you should dress rabbits out wearing gloves because of this.

With pigs, the big one to worry about is Trichina worm. This is why the meat needs to be cooked thoroughly in pork. All domestic pork is/should be free of this, but wild may be another story.

I tend to stay away from organ meats and anything to do with the central nervous system (brain, spinal cord), as these can be sources of some rather nasty stuff. There was two courses in my educational past that scared the heck out of me: parasitology and public health. There are things that I will never eat, and places that I will never visit!

Tactical Retreat
12-17-2012, 11:16 PM
Another one to be careful with is jackrabbit (cottontails are great!) in many areas, as they can carry worms.

Being a desert rat, I have dined on many a Jack. The tapeworm is only present in it's coernal state in Jacks, and it is an easily spotted giant water filled sac in the muscle tissue. Just cut around it and you're golden. The jackrabbit is a integral part of the tapeworm's life cycle in the desert. The worm actually requires two animals to complete the cycle. The rabbit ingests the eggs on grass, and the larvae travels through the blood stream into the muscular tissue. A coernus is formed containing the "pupae." When a coyote eats the rabbit, the sac bursts, and the worm develops in the coyote's digestive tract. The coerni can be thought of as a sort of crygenic chamber, as they can keep the worm's reproductive cycle in stasis for years until the rabbit dies and is scavenged. As with any parasite, thorough cooking will render it harmless.

racetrack
12-17-2012, 11:22 PM
Mountain lion is as good as it gets, especially the loins and tenderloins. Beats mule deer and elk any day. Bear are ok in the fall around here if we get a decent acorn crop and you get a young one. I know, everyone wants a big boar and then they wonder why he tastes like he smells. Old timers that didn't have lard were glad to get bear grease and used it on everything. Carnivore, herbivore, doesn't matter. Younger is better, take care of the meat as good as you can and cook it well.

Ahnkochee
12-17-2012, 11:24 PM
My take on it is simple:
Genesis 9:2-3

"The fear and dread of you will fall on all the beasts of the earth, and on all the birds in the sky, on every creature that moves along the ground, and on all the fish in the sea; they are given into your hands. 3 Everything that lives and moves about will be food for you. Just as I gave you the green plants, I now give you everything."

You left out the most important part: Genesis 9:4 "Only flesh with its soul—its blood—YOU must not eat."
I personally don't eat the blood of any animal. :58:

sticker
12-17-2012, 11:43 PM
I don't remember the name of the show I was watching..It was some where in Africa. There was this guy talking to the village chief, and he was told they had recently killed a lion that had attacked the village. He asked what they did with it, and the chief said we ate him. Then he was asked if it was good. The chief looked at him like he was stupid and said it was Meat so yes it was good!!
Those of us that have access to all sorts of food forget the simple reality of life outside our comfort zone. Its been some time since I saw that show, but the chiefs words still stick with me.

driggs5454
12-18-2012, 01:10 AM
Everything tastes good if you put enough season-all and cayenne on it

Survival Jeff
12-18-2012, 01:17 AM
I grew up eating bear, deer, moose, all are great. Coon, possum, squirrel, snapping turtles, rattle snakes, alligator,muskrat, beaver, all good if done right. The only thing I wouldnt eat ever again is coyote, worst meat I ever had. Like eating burnt rubber from an old boot.

misplacedmike
12-18-2012, 03:15 AM
I've been told not not to eat the heart or liver of a meat eater didn't ask why just took his word on it

cucumberfly
12-18-2012, 05:40 AM
Do you guys wear gloves when processing game? I know I don't but is that a problem? anyone get sick from cleaning their game?

cucumberfly
12-18-2012, 05:44 AM
No Gar eggs ?

Aren't those poisonous?

bone collector 85
12-18-2012, 07:52 AM
Me ill try anything once ive eaten bear deer elk moose rabbit squirrel gator ostrich boar geese duck pheasant quail woodcock caribou and all sorts of fish its all great if prepared right my fav meat is elk and deer and fish would be striper and trout

NGshooter17
12-22-2012, 11:05 PM
I just finished reading the journals of Alexander Mackenzie - they ate fox, wolves and even eagles. I've eaten some sea birds that tasted like really old fish - can't imagine what an eagle would taste like.

Did you see the eagle that recently wondered what a baby might taste like? Some scarry stuff.

NGshooter17
12-22-2012, 11:06 PM
Personally, I dont eat pork. I think pigs are disgusting animals.

Gator meat is mighty tasty though :4:

tree-ratsniper
12-22-2012, 11:07 PM
"Did you see the eagle that recently wondered what a baby might taste like? Some scarry stuff."

Bald eagles taste like chicken (or so I've been told)! :3:

JRwhite
12-23-2012, 12:00 AM
Haha I saw that eagle video. I wish that was me. That was sweet.
I recommend not raring skunk obviously. All frogs are edible. Some are poisonous unless you remove the skin. Don't eat toads. And don't eat box turtles. All other turtles I believe are fine.

DBX
12-23-2012, 12:02 AM
Did you see the eagle that recently wondered what a baby might taste like? Some scarry stuff.

That video was computer generated. NOT REAL. It was done for a grade in a CGI class.

NGshooter17
12-23-2012, 01:03 PM
That video was computer generated. NOT REAL. It was done for a grade in a CGI class.

oh, they did a good job. lol. A Golden Eagle is more than capable of doing that though. They have taken much larger things before.

Ahnkochee
12-23-2012, 01:28 PM
oh, they did a good job. lol. A Golden Eagle is more than capable of doing that though. They have taken much larger things before.

Amen, Mongols train Golden Eagles to kill wolves. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TItHEUOXCeI

Ahnkochee
12-23-2012, 01:32 PM
I wouldn't eat a skunk (or drink pee). :4: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GkZCayKC5eE

NGshooter17
12-23-2012, 06:24 PM
I wouldn't eat a skunk (or drink pee). :4: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GkZCayKC5eE

There is a certain Bear know to drink pee. lol

Nightside_Eclipse
12-24-2012, 01:32 PM
Aren't those poisonous?

Yes, gar roe and artic animal livers are the only N American meats you can't eat.

YTSESoldier
12-24-2012, 02:22 PM
Bear does taste good. So does raccoon and opossem. Pigeons they say are good too. Sometimes people get hang ups about food. But if you think about it we all eat stuff that might be gross. Like pigs.

Yup, just watch Food, Inc. to see how most of the food you get from a supermarket gets there....anything you hunt is likely to be cleaner/better for you that store bought mass produced stuff unless its free range/organnic....just mind prevalent diseases in your area as mentioned earlier. One I learned about in microbiology this year is bear....cook it thoroughly wherever you kill it....trust me.

Knighthorse
12-24-2012, 08:14 PM
For personal belief reasons I would not eat Equine, Cervine, or Ovine. (horses/donkeys/mules Deer/elk or Sheep.
I've tried buffalo, gator, grasshopper (pull the head that takes the stomach and poop with it) ants, (buttery) striper, (Hybrid caught here 15" long) catfish, and haddock.
I just completed the home study for hunter education, and have an appt for the field day section to have the small game hunting license. I fish, and its just a few dollars more to have the hunting part also. Even if I don't hunt small game, the money goes to the conservation department.
From what I know, polar bear liver is toxic to consume. Raccoon is very nice when barbequed. (others opinion around here) Seems to me that it mostly depends on proper cooking to well done in almost all cases. (for standard muscle meats, not entrails) All mammals are supposed to be edible, but some don't taste very good. I read that there are no poisonous freshwater fish. Also, all snakes are edible. Rattlesnake poison is rendered harmless by cooking. (study done supposedly to see if a snake biting itself during capture or killing would contaminate the meat) I'd whack the snake, remove the head, and immediately bury the head. THEN proceed. Your results may vary, contact your attorney for details, point away from face when opening, etc.
sorry for the ramble.

Lamewolf
01-16-2013, 11:08 AM
Any animal is edible, but not all taste good. And, some can also carry disease, particularly in organs. My suggestion is to do your research based on your areas you plan to hunt. To the best of my recollection, the only meat to stay from are from carrion eaters-vultures, hyenas, et al.

Using my galaxy s2 via tapatalk, because I am too lazy to find a computer

Not quite true (not calling you a liar), some frogs and fish are toxic - do your homework first. But most furbearers with 4 legs are edible as are most insects (6 legs).

Gii shi kan dug
01-16-2013, 12:39 PM
The only ones you can not eat are the ones that eat you first!

Joe Willson
01-16-2013, 03:22 PM
This is a quote from the Nova web site and an article about eating insects.

"*Warning: Although many insects are edible, entomophagy poses some risks. If you are allergic to shrimp, shellfish, dust, or chocolate, never eat an insect. Even the non-allergic, unless in a survival situation, should never eat a raw insect. Certain insects store compounds that make some people sick; some are poisonous; others may be carcinogenic. Be as cautious with insects as you would be if you were gathering mushrooms. Know your insects!"

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/ants/bugs-nf.html

EdD270
01-16-2013, 03:30 PM
For personal belief reasons I would not eat Equine, Cervine, or Ovine. (horses/donkeys/mules Deer/elk or Sheep.
I've tried buffalo, gator, grasshopper (pull the head that takes the stomach and poop with it) ants, (buttery) striper, (Hybrid caught here 15" long) catfish, and haddock.
I just completed the home study for hunter education, and have an appt for the field day section to have the small game hunting license. I fish, and its just a few dollars more to have the hunting part also. Even if I don't hunt small game, the money goes to the conservation department.
From what I know, polar bear liver is toxic to consume. Raccoon is very nice when barbequed. (others opinion around here) Seems to me that it mostly depends on proper cooking to well done in almost all cases. (for standard muscle meats, not entrails) All mammals are supposed to be edible, but some don't taste very good. I read that there are no poisonous freshwater fish. Also, all snakes are edible. Rattlesnake poison is rendered harmless by cooking. (study done supposedly to see if a snake biting itself during capture or killing would contaminate the meat) I'd whack the snake, remove the head, and immediately bury the head. THEN proceed. Your results may vary, contact your attorney for details, point away from face when opening, etc.
sorry for the ramble.

Just to clarify the above quote. The rattlesnake's venom glands are in it's head, just behind the jaw, and are easily removed when you sever the head from the body. When preparing rattlesnake for eating, the first thing you need to do after killing the snake is to remove it's head and bury it. If you do not remove it's head and properly dispose of it, it may still bite you and envenomate you even several hours after it's dead.

Tactical Retreat
01-16-2013, 08:08 PM
Just to clarify the above quote. The rattlesnake's venom glands are in it's head, just behind the jaw, and are easily removed when you sever the head from the body. When preparing rattlesnake for eating, the first thing you need to do after killing the snake is to remove it's head and bury it. If you do not remove it's head and properly dispose of it, it may still bite you and envenomate you even several hours after it's dead.


I can back that the venom is deactivated by cooking. I gut shot a rabbit with a pellet gun a few years back and it ran right into a big southern pacific rattler on an embankment. The snake bit the hell out of it and it dropped after another few yards. I went and bagged the rabbit, thanked the snake, then shot it too, lol. Knowing the venom is a protein and not an actual toxin, I cooked both the snake and the rabbit up and ate 'em. Didn't get sick at all, and no noticeable taste difference.

Knighthorse
07-19-2013, 12:51 PM
Suppose I should've posted BURY THE HEAD FIRST, in all caps instead of my original post lower case. :)
It is weird to see the head, with no body, biting at air. (in that case someone else whacked the snake, I was very young, and just a witness. no snake-steak for me then)

perdidochas
07-19-2013, 12:56 PM
Was it tasty? I'm a prepper and you never know what annoying neighborhood animals will make a tasty dinner
The problem with eating pets is that some of the medicines used in pets is not approved for usage with food animals.

OldMan
07-19-2013, 01:44 PM
Most meat can be eaten, just be careful with the preparation and learn a few things about the wildlife in your area. Most of us are aware of trichinosis from eating pork that is not fully cooked. A polar bear's liver shouldn't be eaten due to it containing more vitamin A than the human body can handle. (See Hypervitaminosis A (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypervitaminosis_A) ) From that article here's a quote: "While liver is often eaten, the vitamin A content of the liver of certain animals—including the polar bear, seal,[12] walrus,[13] moose,[14] and husky—is highly hazardous." Note that this is in reference to the liver, not the rest of the animal. the rest of the meat of the bear, walrus, and of course moose, is completely edible.

When you examine your catch/kill one of the things you're looking for is signs of disease in the fur and internal organs. The last three raccoons I've caught had visible worm infestations throughout their digestive tract, including liver and heart...so the meat was something I deemed unusable, even with cooking. Perhaps in an extreme survival situation while on the verge of starvation from not having eaten in weeks and cook it until there is no doubt that it is cooked well done, but not under conditions deemed normal or even survival related. Raccoons, squirrels and opossum are major carriers of rabies in my area, so again I am careful in the catch, cleaning, and preparation of these animals.

Personally, while I will eat them, I don't care for opossum, it's not only very fatty but to me I don't care for the taste, but I still eat it, aside from the fact that t looks like a large rat. I've rendered their fat for tallow as well as for soap making along with wood ash. Bobcat, Lynx, Coyote are okay to eat for their meat, but again I avoid their livers, kidneys and hearts.

Rats, while known as the primary cause of the spread plagues in Europe, can be eaten if cooked well. Aboard the sailing ships of old during long voyages - when food supplies were running low - midshipmen often caught and cooked rats and sold them to the crew. The nickname for the cooked rats was "Millers". It was caught and killed as a rat, cooked and served as a miller.

Basically it's that similar facts about wild plants are also true with wild animals. Not all parts of an edible plant can always be consumed safely all of the time and not all parts of a fur bearing animal can be consumed safely.

Edit: As a side note for the religious aspect (any religion), the taboos on certain animals often have roots in the ancient times regarding preparation, cooking and storage. For instance, Leviticus tells us not to consume pork as it's unclean, while several thousand years later James is given the vision that all animals are fit to eat. While one could surmise that pork was somehow divinely transformed, it is more likely that over a few thousand years people developed better cooking methods and/or learned to cook it thoroughly. Pigs also aren't the cleanest looking of animals either and I'm sure that had a lot to do with it as well.

Food storage wasn't great in those days, no refrigeration and all. Smoking and drying were used for preservation, but some foods just aren't conducive to that. Shellfish for instance, don't last well during a drying process and go bad. One of the things we look for today when gathering certain shellfish close to shore is whether water runs clear through them or is greenish and we only consume the ones that run clear. In a region where the gene for shellfish allergies run high, combined with an area where coastal red tides and other phenomenon that can cause shellfish to become diseased then you have a basis for a religious taboo upon eating shellfish, and once it is passed on in the religion, it is a habit hard to break, even if the religion is carried forward to areas that don't have the issue with shellfish.

Ralph
07-19-2013, 04:50 PM
Having smelled 'yote when skinned I do not think I could. Beyond that meat is meat; cook it good (read enough to kill tricanous) and you are good. I have maintained that the Old Testament rules against pig is the way it spoils if not refrigerated. Some will not eat catfish because it is a trash eater (consumes the stuff that is waste) as are shrimp. I eat all three pig, catfish and shrimp. I would just suggest checking to see what the disease issues are with the meat and deal with those.

HoboTree
07-19-2013, 04:52 PM
All flesh is edible. Some just needs more salt and pepper than others. About to try some ground kangaroo meat my ol' lady found at the whole food market. I've eaten a couple roadkilled deer before too...Just fine as long as the eyes arent foggy and its been cold out.

SemperFiHunter
07-19-2013, 06:03 PM
Having smelled 'yote when skinned I do not think I could. Beyond that meat is meat; cook it good (read enough to kill tricanous) and you are good. I have maintained that the Old Testament rules against pig is the way it spoils if not refrigerated. Some will not eat catfish because it is a trash eater (consumes the stuff that is waste) as are shrimp. I eat all three pig, catfish and shrimp. I would just suggest checking to see what the disease issues are with the meat and deal with those.

Being a champion of the Flathead Catfish, aka Opelousas, Op, Shovelhead, Yellow Cat,
I must clarify the fact that a mature Flathead is almost purely a predator of other live fish.
Sometimes you may catch them on crawfish, cutbait, or deadbait, but they are like a largemouth bass on steroids.
If you are targeting Flatheads, and know what you are doing, you are using healthy native panfish or chubs.
Maybe even small carp or suckers. My favorite bait for large Flatheads is the hardy Bullhead. They will literally live for days on a trotline.

I also fish for blue cat, mostly with fresh cut shad.
And have been known to drag out the stinkbait to catch a mess
Of them nasty ol' channel cats from time to time

But after eating bullheads a time or two as a kid, they are relegated to the role of bait.

Oohhhhh, and I would have to be MUCHO HAMBRE to eat a stinkin yote, or a possum!!!


SFH

Walnutwoodman
07-19-2013, 06:28 PM
I've ate a lot of different wildlife coon , possum, snake, turtle, the only advice I have is if it's funky don't eat it, otherwise I make sure it's well cooked. Funky meaning diseased (mange, rabies, gang green). I know gang green sounds odd but, my dad shot a deer and when we dressed it we found an arrow inside that the wound had healed but the infection was from the front legs to the start of the back.

Carcajou
07-19-2013, 06:52 PM
We hunt mountain lion here and give the meat to the local indians. Say it tastes like - you guessed it - chicken!

Fish N Chips
07-19-2013, 06:53 PM
I'm not big on eating most bugs (especially not grubs or larva!) but I do love a good grasshopper or cricket, or a big beetle. I like 'em crisp and juicy.

In other countries I've had plates piled full of roast crickets. Good eatin'!

But the real beauty of 'em is that they're just as good eaten live and squirming. No preparation necessary, and they keep themselves very clean. If you're quick with your hands you can just grab and eat. I've surprised people while standing in conversation then snatching a big grasshopper off the wall beside them and chomping down without skipping a beat. Of course I would never do that to anyone who doesn't know me really well and are like-minded survivalists, lol!

If you can get past the psychological block of eating a live bug, you'll find that they have a very sweet, delicious taste (at least the ones I'm familiar with, like grasshoppers and beetles). The soft squishy ones are still too much for me to stomach (even though I swallow raw oysters - go figure, right?), so I have no clue what things like worms (besides eating at McDonalds) or grubs taste like. Oh, but they do catch delicious fish... ;)

Careful eating those grasshoppers raw Ned. They can carry tapeworms and other parasites. So do crickets; it is much better to cook them.

Ralph
07-19-2013, 07:08 PM
We hunt mountain lion here and give the meat to the local indians. Say it tastes like - you guessed it - chicken!

Then me thinkst I'll eat chicken!!

OldMan
07-19-2013, 08:05 PM
We hunt mountain lion here and give the meat to the local indians. Say it tastes like - you guessed it - chicken!


Or is it the reverse? Could it be that chicken tastes like mountain lion?

medic68
07-19-2013, 08:19 PM
I would totally eat that.
I would be glad to bring the beer for a feast that looked that good!

Jon308
07-19-2013, 08:52 PM
cat fish cooked right is great, coon is greasy and tough, beaver is good,, people eat a lot of chicken and chickens will eat anything they are one filthy animal but taste great. pigeon is good, but really small. Squirrel is just like a rat, I wont eat dog or horse un ethical in my book. Other than that I will at least taste it. But not crave it like a good steak or cheese burger.

Pikaru
07-19-2013, 09:03 PM
Flounder are not a bottom feeding fish. They're more of a predator. They hide on the bottom, looking up and striking fast. They're definately not like alge eaters.

bone collector 85
07-19-2013, 09:12 PM
Going ground hog hunting in am if I get one with my recurve ill be trying it thinking if making it like pulled pork ill let everyone know how they taste

Mr.Black
07-19-2013, 09:25 PM
"You can eat anything... some things only once"

OldMan
07-19-2013, 09:44 PM
Going ground hog hunting in am if I get one with my recurve ill be trying it thinking if making it like pulled pork ill let everyone know how they taste

Groundhog is great stuff! Enjoy!

When I was 5 years old and dad was sent overseas in the military, my mom and I stayed the 18 months at my grandparent's house. Grandpa was a hobo during the depression then turned coal miner; and mom and her brothers and sister were raised in the coal mining towns in West Virginia. I learned a lot about where our food comes from while living on the farm, and remember well one day when grandpa drove up to the farm house on the tractor (he'd been in the fields since breakfast) for lunch. Behind the tractor was tied a groundhog he'd shot and he showed me when I ran out to greet him. When we got into the house he told my mom to go skin it and we'd all have it for supper.

Being a military family, we always lived farthest of any of the family members from my grandparents, so going up to visit during spring break and one week during summer was always a treat, and there was always work to do. I learned early on that the pillows were filled with feathers from the ducks; that eggs came from the hen house and not the store; and that tomato sauce came from the garden's tomatoes, not from a can.

Wow, thanks a huge bunch for bringing back these memories. Grandpa died in '84 and due to family squabbles over the property, I haven't been back to the farm since other than to drive pass it in '99.

Keyser Söze
07-19-2013, 10:04 PM
but my preferred meat of them all IS LAMB

jake lewis
07-19-2013, 10:07 PM
When i was 18 i use to work with a state trapper an coyote is not a good choice they carry a lot if nastys bobcat would be a better choice makes a good stew. id stay away from the canine family.

Bartnmax
07-19-2013, 10:09 PM
I have one very particular rule when it comes to dinner - eat nothing with 3 eyes, 5 legs or that glows in the dark.
Seiously though, I have a mate that used to make damned good money selling red foxes to a certain sector of the asian community over here (like $100 each).
They reckon the red dogs were great to eat, although after smelling em I don't think I could ever hold any down for very long.
Also, whilst I have eaten, & quite like, a good tender, young kid goat, I do draw trhe line at 'ol' stinky' - them big ol' billys that so much enjoy p _ _ing all overt 'emselves to attract the girls.

SpankyMA1971
08-04-2013, 06:51 PM
We have a fair amount of woodchucks around my home. How much meat would a typical woodchuck yield?

jorg0370
08-04-2013, 08:20 PM
I wish I remembered where I read that a polar bear's liver was not good to eat since it has a lethal dose of vitamin A. Not that I run into polar bears often, it just surprised me.

amusin
08-04-2013, 08:28 PM
I'd avoid the liver and kidney of any predator. Things have a tendency to accumulate up the food chain and in the organ meats.
Eating the organs of a predator is double concentration.
*Missing one clue and a pile of self motivation, if you've seen either of these items please contact me*

amusin
08-04-2013, 08:29 PM
We have a fair amount of woodchucks around my home. How much meat would a typical woodchuck yield?

Use one per diner in soup or stew.

*Missing one clue and a pile of self motivation, if you've seen either of these items please contact me*

Chazzle
08-04-2013, 09:17 PM
I tell people that I'm a member of P.E.T.A. (People Eating Tasty Animals)

9dawgs
08-05-2013, 09:27 AM
Actually with the right preparation you can eat just about any animal. As stated in previous posts I would stay away from any organ meats though and just eat the muscle.

iscariot
08-06-2013, 06:24 AM
bears can carry some really nasty parasites same with boars,i read somwhere that people hunted them during winter back in the day and let the meat freeze until summer ( 6 months or so) to kill off alot of the nasty stuff,then just cook it really well.
Local laws here demand boar and bear meat is inspected if your going to sell it because of the serious health risks it has.

Personally i wouldnt eat animals or fish from urban areas though,they must taste horrible since they eat garbage and god knows what nasty chemicals are in them.
Ive personally seen the crap spewed out into the water from industrial areas where i live with people fishing like 30 meters downstream :26:

Morlog
08-06-2013, 08:49 AM
Armadillos are the only species other than man that can be a carrier for leprosy. I would not recommend eating that particular critter. As for Coyote, I was watching a show a couple of years ago on the Military Channel, it was the USMC Winter Survival school. Interesting show. The first test before they even go into the field, they have to harvest a rabbit and eat its eyes. That is not why I mention it here though. Part of the training was to create and set a snare. The students all set their snares, and out of twenty or thirty, one actually wound up with a coyote in it. The instructors took the coyote to the end of the day's hike, and buried in the snow. First letting the students think that even though they had succeeded, they were not going to reap the fruits of their labor, then giving them a reprieve. It was an interesting two part show. The relevance to this thread is that they did eat coyote.

Paul Foreman
08-06-2013, 10:33 AM
yep, flatheads be gamefish ... :)

Meat Hunter
08-12-2013, 08:36 PM
Hell ya can eat anything. Some may be just more palatable than others. I've had coon, bear, chipmunk, ground squirrel, snake amongst other critters over the years.
Even bald eagle cooks up pretty good, taste almost like spotted owl :11: