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View Full Version : Winter Hike and Camp Pack Loadout, ideas?



12G Slug
02-22-2013, 08:24 PM
set up now for cold weather.

MOLLE Riflemans Ruck

Tools-
Leatherman Surge
Cold Steel Trail Hawk
Condor Bushlore
Headlight w/ spare batts
Ruger GP 100 6' (30 rounds, 6 in cylinder, 24 on speed strips to hold them)
Take-down Recurve (60lb)
8 Arrows (assorted)
Digital Camera w/batts

Eating/Water-
2 1 Qt canteens
1 2 qt collapsable canteen
canteen cup w/ stove
Trangia alcohol burner w/ 1 refill
fork/spoon (dont like sporks prefer this)
Purification tabs
folded tin foil

Shelter/Sleep-
10x10 BCUSA Tarp w/ ridgeline (braided 550)
Military MSS
Foam lying pad
mylar blanket
extra fleece/wool socks/baclava

Fire-
Firesteel or flint & steel kit
Bic
cotton tinder

Food-
Bannock
Parched and spiced corn
jerky
maybe a bag of candy
coffee grounds

Other-
50ft 550 cord
First Aid kit (in grenade pouch)
Compass
Bandana
Tiolet paper
All-use soap (in airplane shot bottle)
Small Mirror
Light rain poncho
small roll of orange flagging (for trail marking)
braided jute rope (4ft)
Bible (mini)

about to take it on a winter hike and camp. i think it looks good personally but hey i want ideas thanks

Moondog55
02-22-2013, 08:52 PM
OK Hmmm? 20th century gear and 18th century food, I personally find that a strange mix. More food needed, sugar and fat BACON??
Only 2 ways of making fire, I'd add a second BIC or some matches and as firelighting in winter is not something to play with I would add some extra tinder and firelighters.
Will you need to melt snow? The mistake I keep picking up over here is people not taking a pot big enough to melt snow for drinking and cooking water. Mors K always recommends a pot of at least 2 liters ( 2 quarts) while I prefer one even larger ( after all you stuff them full of all your other gear so it doesn't actually take up much extra room0 and a big pot is just so much more efficient and iff you use an A-10 can costs nothing if you use aluminium foil for the lid and an old coat hanger for the bail
Depending on minimum temperature and snow cover a second half or 3/4 length pad would add safety and comfort at little weight and cost

Personally I don't see the need for all the extra ammunition unless you plan to practice

That sounds like a lot for an overnite but close to what I pack. What's the total weight?

MohaveGreen
02-22-2013, 09:13 PM
Seriously, looks pretty good to me. I'd also say maybe one more way to make fire - stash some matches or another bic somewhere. Maybe another canteen cup if you've got it, for melting snow if needed while you're drinking coffee out of the other one. I also didn't see a lid, but I presume that's what the tinfoil is for. I also like to eat, so maybe more food. I also tend to prefer bank line to paracord, but that's a small detail. I didn't notice, but do you have something to sit on? I carry a piece of gore-tex as a groundcloth in the summer, but a piece of closed-cell pad would be even better as insulation in the winter. I also like to carry a couple items for signalling, like a small mirror and a glowstick. But really, I think you've got it covered.

ETA: I see now you've got the mirror. So disregard that comment and carry on. But I'd also add a tube of carmex for obvious reasons, and to help with fire-starting if needed. A good multi-use item.

Keithcompton
02-22-2013, 09:47 PM
Since you asked, I'll offer a few ideas, although you look more than prepared:
1) a stuffsack or something that you can stuff unworn softgoods to make a pillow (I have a really hard time sleeping without some kind of pillow)
2) an extra flashlight or pocket LED lantern...it could get pretty dark if something happens to your headlight
3) A stove stand for the trangia burner - I assume that you have a potstand to support the canteen cup over the trangia burner, but didn't see anything listed
4) a small foam sit/kneeling pad, depending on what shape your knees are in :)
5) something to use as a groundcloth unless you plan to put the foam sleeping pad on the ground. It may not be necessary, but I like having an extra barrier to keep my sleeping pad clean and to keep ground moisture away from my sleeping gear. On the other hand, if your mylar blanket is the thicker casualty blanket type then you already have it.
6) a collapsible trowel for digging catholes, unless you plan to whittle a digging stick
7) lightweight aluminum stakes to stake down the tarp, unless you plan to whittle wooden pegs, and tieout lines for the tarp (unless you keep them attached)
8) a map of the area that you are hiking in
9) lightweight gloves or glove liners, depending on how cold it is. Cold fingers are no fun.

Have fun!


set up now for cold weather.

MOLLE Riflemans Ruck

Tools-
Leatherman Surge
Cold Steel Trail Hawk
Condor Bushlore
Headlight w/ spare batts
Ruger GP 100 6' (30 rounds, 6 in cylinder, 24 on speed strips to hold them)
Take-down Recurve (60lb)
8 Arrows (assorted)
Digital Camera w/batts

Eating/Water-
2 1 Qt canteens
1 2 qt collapsable canteen
canteen cup w/ stove
Trangia alcohol burner w/ 1 refill
fork/spoon (dont like sporks prefer this)
Purification tabs
folded tin foil

Shelter/Sleep-
10x10 BCUSA Tarp w/ ridgeline (braided 550)
Military MSS
Foam lying pad
mylar blanket
extra fleece/wool socks/baclava

Fire-
Firesteel or flint & steel kit
Bic
cotton tinder

Food-
Bannock
Parched and spiced corn
jerky
maybe a bag of candy
coffee grounds

Other-
50ft 550 cord
First Aid kit (in grenade pouch)
Compass
Bandana
Tiolet paper
All-use soap (in airplane shot bottle)
Small Mirror
Light rain poncho
small roll of orange flagging (for trail marking)
braided jute rope (4ft)
Bible (mini)

about to take it on a winter hike and camp. i think it looks good personally but hey i want ideas thanks

Seeker
02-22-2013, 09:53 PM
the baclava needs to be moved to the "food" section. and you need to add a balaclava to your "hat and clothes" section. :D

seriously, it looks good enough. you'll figure out what you're missing while you're out, and will then decide if it's worth bringing next time, since you got along fine without it. i have learned more from things i forgot than from things i remembered to bring. however, i would definitely add another lighter, and i'll echo the comments about a larger pot. making drinking water from snow is a long task, and more efficient over a fire than the alcohol stove. might want to carry a little more than one "shot" of that. i use a little 8oz water bottle for my alcohol. works good as a firestarter too. in my opinion, there's nothing wrong with using every advantage to start a fire in the winter.

edit: i'm assuming you're only listing your 'pack' stuff, and will be wearing proper footwear, clothing, layers, gloves, and headgear.

Jin
02-22-2013, 10:09 PM
How far out ya going? Watch the weight, it adds up quick! Maybe not so much ammo. Definitely more food, and maybe a novel with the bible. Gets dark quick, and gets boring staring at the fire and nothing else after the first 5 hrs. I like to have a couple different reading items when I'm out.

I like the thought of 3 different firestarters, and definitely some man made tinder...for the "damn it nothing is working" moment :)

Pillow/sack to make a pillow is always nice, but you can lay something over your boots and sleep on that if anything. For sitting pad you can always use some pine boughs or inside of some bark.

Looks good though and like others have said, you'll find out what you need after a few trips out. Have fun!

Foilist
02-22-2013, 10:18 PM
I'd add more food and warm shelter/insulation materials, and ditch the weapons (unless hunting or target shooting is the point of the outing). Is there snow in your area? I was out today for a wander, and I really wished I had a pair of snow shoes.

12G Slug
02-22-2013, 10:23 PM
OK Hmmm? 20th century gear and 18th century food, I personally find that a strange mix. More food needed, sugar and fat BACON??
Only 2 ways of making fire, I'd add a second BIC or some matches and as firelighting in winter is not something to play with I would add some extra tinder and firelighters.
Will you need to melt snow? The mistake I keep picking up over here is people not taking a pot big enough to melt snow for drinking and cooking water. Mors K always recommends a pot of at least 2 liters ( 2 quarts) while I prefer one even larger ( after all you stuff them full of all your other gear so it doesn't actually take up much extra room0 and a big pot is just so much more efficient and iff you use an A-10 can costs nothing if you use aluminium foil for the lid and an old coat hanger for the bail
Depending on minimum temperature and snow cover a second half or 3/4 length pad would add safety and comfort at little weight and cost

Personally I don't see the need for all the extra ammunition unless you plan to practice

That sounds like a lot for an overnite but close to what I pack. What's the total weight?

dont see why my food matters...and i did not list amounts. i have enough. i just like trying out different things. good change up from spam and ramen.

im good with the fire thing its not my first time out, seems like most of this is preference. iv not had problems before with melting enough snow, but the larger pot is a good idea.

rodger on the ammo.

12G Slug
02-22-2013, 10:28 PM
the baclava needs to be moved to the "food" section. and you need to add a balaclava to your "hat and clothes" section. :D

seriously, it looks good enough. you'll figure out what you're missing while you're out, and will then decide if it's worth bringing next time, since you got along fine without it. i have learned more from things i forgot than from things i remembered to bring. however, i would definitely add another lighter, and i'll echo the comments about a larger pot. making drinking water from snow is a long task, and more efficient over a fire than the alcohol stove. might want to carry a little more than one "shot" of that. i use a little 8oz water bottle for my alcohol. works good as a firestarter too. in my opinion, there's nothing wrong with using every advantage to start a fire in the winter.

edit: i'm assuming you're only listing your 'pack' stuff, and will be wearing proper footwear, clothing, layers, gloves, and headgear.
i ment balaclava lol....must be hungry

the alcohol burner is for fun mostly, i plan on doing everything by wood fire.

and yes this is just pack

How far out ya going? Watch the weight, it adds up quick! Maybe not so much ammo. Definitely more food, and maybe a novel with the bible. Gets dark quick, and gets boring staring at the fire and nothing else after the first 5 hrs. I like to have a couple different reading items when I'm out.

I like the thought of 3 different firestarters, and definitely some man made tinder...for the "damn it nothing is working" moment :)

Pillow/sack to make a pillow is always nice, but you can lay something over your boots and sleep on that if anything. For sitting pad you can always use some pine boughs or inside of some bark.

Looks good though and like others have said, you'll find out what you need after a few trips out. Have fun!
i have tinder, cotton balls and vasline. i like to whittle fire side so ill plenty to work on in the "down time".

im going about 2 miles in. the weight is fine for me, or at least has been in the past.

I'd add more food and warm shelter/insulation materials, and ditch the weapons (unless hunting or target shooting is the point of the outing). Is there snow in your area? I was out today for a wander, and I really wished I had a pair of snow shoes.

yea weapons are to practice with. we have about 2 inchs of snow, it keeps warming up and melting. its 34F right now.

Jin
02-22-2013, 10:30 PM
dont see why my food matters...and i did not list amounts. i have enough

i good with the fire thing its not my first time out, seems like most of this is preference. iv not had problems before with melting enough snow, but the larger pot is a good idea.

rodger on the ammo.

I suggest more food just cause lol. I like to eat when I'm out, tend to get more hungry after making shelters, trudging through snow, being cold, just chilling by fire and want something to snack on. But more importantly is if I can't make it back on time. A little extra hearty food never hurts is all.

12G Slug
02-22-2013, 10:33 PM
Since you asked, I'll offer a few ideas, although you look more than prepared:
1) a stuffsack or something that you can stuff unworn softgoods to make a pillow (I have a really hard time sleeping without some kind of pillow)
2) an extra flashlight or pocket LED lantern...it could get pretty dark if something happens to your headlight
3) A stove stand for the trangia burner - I assume that you have a potstand to support the canteen cup over the trangia burner, but didn't see anything listed
4) a small foam sit/kneeling pad, depending on what shape your knees are in :)
5) something to use as a groundcloth unless you plan to put the foam sleeping pad on the ground. It may not be necessary, but I like having an extra barrier to keep my sleeping pad clean and to keep ground moisture away from my sleeping gear. On the other hand, if your mylar blanket is the thicker casualty blanket type then you already have it.
6) a collapsible trowel for digging catholes, unless you plan to whittle a digging stick
7) lightweight aluminum stakes to stake down the tarp, unless you plan to whittle wooden pegs, and tieout lines for the tarp (unless you keep them attached)
8) a map of the area that you are hiking in
9) lightweight gloves or glove liners, depending on how cold it is. Cold fingers are no fun.

Have fun!
thanks. yea i have a pot stand forgot to list that. i tuck the tarp under where i sleep for the ground cover.

i plan to whittle pegs and stakes for shelter.

12G Slug
02-22-2013, 10:42 PM
i will be adding a big pot

Moondog55
02-22-2013, 11:05 PM
Don't get me wrong please. my comment was just that, noting that the foods you were taking were more traditional then your gear. My comments also were to do with the "Oh Crap' moment when you find yourself just aching for a bacon sandwich at 3 AckEmma to go with your coffee.
I find almost everything is personal and depends on level of fitness and experience, the 1/2 pad I suggest I also use as a sit pad.

12G Slug
02-23-2013, 12:04 AM
Don't get me wrong please. my comment was just that, noting that the foods you were taking were more traditional then your gear. My comments also were to do with the "Oh Crap' moment when you find yourself just aching for a bacon sandwich at 3 AckEmma to go with your coffee.
I find almost everything is personal and depends on level of fitness and experience, the 1/2 pad I suggest I also use as a sit pad.

i understand and was quick to jump to defense, mu apologise.

i went out and bought a 1lb a bacon to take as well lol

12G Slug
02-23-2013, 12:09 AM
is it unhealthy to cook food in a #10 food can? i thought it was bad to heat those up and eat from it. i know it can be done, but its kinda like the whole microwaving your food in plastic tupperwear thing to me.

if im mistaken then i have a can ready to go!

Moondog55
02-23-2013, 01:14 AM
I have been using them to boil water for years, I think years ago there were some that had a zinc lining inside, those were toxic, mostly I use ones that had tomatoes in them or coffee, that is an epoxy lining usually and good for a few boils, real tin is as safe as anything we use and was why we called them tin cans in the first place. Even the zinc coating is OK to boil water in, just don't ever cook in a zinc coated container, food acids dissolve the zinc and produce quite a toxic brew.
When the coating wears off they then become hobo stoves.
My medium sized billy (2 liters) fits inside an A-10 can ( 3.110 liters) and I find I can light small fire and boil the billy practically anywhere with the absolute minimum of fuel.

I keep telling the uber ultra-lite people that skimping on your pot size may work in good weather but bite you in the backside in winter/snow especially
Enjoy your trip
I am waiting and preparing for winter here

12G Slug
02-23-2013, 02:10 PM
I have been using them to boil water for years, I think years ago there were some that had a zinc lining inside, those were toxic, mostly I use ones that had tomatoes in them or coffee, that is an epoxy lining usually and good for a few boils, real tin is as safe as anything we use and was why we called them tin cans in the first place. Even the zinc coating is OK to boil water in, just don't ever cook in a zinc coated container, food acids dissolve the zinc and produce quite a toxic brew.
When the coating wears off they then become hobo stoves.
My medium sized billy (2 liters) fits inside an A-10 can ( 3.110 liters) and I find I can light small fire and boil the billy practically anywhere with the absolute minimum of fuel.

I keep telling the uber ultra-lite people that skimping on your pot size may work in good weather but bite you in the backside in winter/snow especially
Enjoy your trip
I am waiting and preparing for winter here

adding a coffee can then. thanks again

Moondog55
02-24-2013, 05:33 AM
Comments and thoughts when you come back please. Hard to critique your own choices but I would appreciate any you care to share

Panzer
02-24-2013, 07:20 AM
Yes, food really is important especially during the winter. Nothing wrong with the menu at all. That's up to you. Just make sure you have enough. Hot liquids at night before bed will help you sleep warmer. I think you got it all covered. Pics on your trip please! :)

12G Slug
02-24-2013, 06:53 PM
ill post up pics when i go. still waiting for the all clear. wont be till later this week or maybe next week but i hope not lthat long

Seniorman
02-24-2013, 07:22 PM
I'm wondering which State you'll be setting up your cold weather camp?

S.M.

12G Slug
02-25-2013, 01:15 PM
I'm wondering which State you'll be setting up your cold weather camp?

S.M.

Michigan

bodhran4me
02-25-2013, 05:02 PM
I like an extra pair of boot liners. Can dry a pair and have a dry pair in evening or at night.

Remember to try to keep your alcohol warm, cold alcohol is tough to light as I rediscovered at -15*C recently. A quick brew when your fire is out is a real beauty.

tburred
03-24-2013, 10:03 AM
Looks like a pretty good list.
The only thing I would consider adding if I were going out with it, would be a bucksaw blade.
If it has been freezing and thawing, a lot of the easy wood to gather might be damp.
If you don't mind whittling, all you would need to bring is the blade and a couple bolts.
Then you could process bigger logs and get to dry wood if it turned into a longer or colder stay than anticipated.

12G Slug
03-26-2013, 09:20 PM
looks like im finally going this friday. it will be mid 30's. didnt want you guys to think i bailed out. even though it will be warmer than 20F now.


i have decided to drop all weapons and add my BK9 for grass harvesting. and some better food like beans and franks. i also added a large billy can.

im also taking my medium alice out instead of the molle. im coming down with a nasty cold/sinus infection...hope that it does not get super bad. i have started medicating with my fish anti-biotics lol

ill post pics saturday!!

amusin
03-27-2013, 01:21 AM
one of the cheep plastic long tobogans can be more fun than a pack in snow, part of your shelter/sleep system, and bungee over your pack with minimum encumberance if you run into dry ground. Also makes gathering a heaping pile of firewood easy

12G Slug
03-28-2013, 02:15 PM
one of the cheep plastic long tobogans can be more fun than a pack in snow, part of your shelter/sleep system, and bungee over your pack with minimum encumberance if you run into dry ground. Also makes gathering a heaping pile of firewood easy

very good idea. but almost all the snow has melted :(

12G Slug
03-30-2013, 06:05 PM
well i did it. and it was awsome.


thanks for your help guys

http://bushcraftusa.com/forum/showthread.php/35146-(B)-5-Outings-for-Bushclassusa/page183

Moondog55
04-03-2013, 09:39 PM
well i did it. and it was awsome.


thanks for your help guys

http://bushcraftusa.com/forum/showthread.php/35146-(B)-5-Outings-for-Bushclassusa/page183

Now you need to critique your trip, report on your gear choices and use the experience to modify you pack-out load. We look for the write up soon. Critiquing your own experiences is hard but a good way to work and a very quick way to learn

12G Slug
04-06-2013, 02:03 PM
Now you need to critique your trip, report on your gear choices and use the experience to modify you pack-out load. We look for the write up soon. Critiquing your own experiences is hard but a good way to work and a very quick way to learn

yes you are 100% right. thanks for laying it out there for me. ill post it up soon

12G Slug
04-06-2013, 03:07 PM
After my first cold weather over-nighter-

i could have gotten away with a smaller pack (medium alice)

Could have used a hatchet more than large knife

dry grass makes great insulation

next time i will also go alone instead of with 3 others. i was the only 1 with a shelter and proper winter sleeping gear. because of this i let the others sleep closer to the fire, and had to sleep on the unprotected end of my crowded tarp. there was also issues over burning just sticks, or burning logs /split wood (they did not like that idea). i always burn logs star-fire style. o well.

it would have been nice to have pre-made para-cord tabs for the tarp also.


other than that, it went very well and i think i did pretty well.

OldManGlitch
05-17-2013, 09:53 AM
Great Recommendations. Thanks

OldManGlitch
05-17-2013, 09:58 AM
Slug, great that your comfortable with your skills. I've heard it said, the more you know and practice your skills the less you have to carry. Just a thought on producing water from snow. I saw on SKOGNIV's site, a snow generator. Basically an old blue jean pant leg (Cut Off) and tied at the ankle, Stuffed with snow and suspended from a tripod near a fire. As the snow would melt, it would drip into a container of any sort. What this did was create a much larger surface area exposed to the heat of the fire and allow for quicker production of water. Might look into it. A folded old blue jean leg is much lighter than an additional or even larger pot.

Dcycleman
12-23-2013, 05:35 AM
One thing that works really good for me is a section of a z lite pad to sit on. Super worth it. Then you can throw it under your other pad at night for extra warmth too