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View Full Version : Best oil to prevent a carbon steel blade from rusting?



photobear
04-06-2013, 02:49 PM
So which oil do you use to keep a carbon steel blade from rusting? Can I use WD40, or is that not a good thing to do?

WisconsinEric
04-06-2013, 02:53 PM
It smells terrible, but it should work fine... I believe the "WD" in WD-40 is for Water Displacer..... I think the 40 part is for 40 uses. Sometimes I use Rem oil, sometimes olive oil, or peanut oil, or even knife honing oil.... made for sharpening knives.

Sides
04-06-2013, 03:03 PM
That depends on if the knife is used for food. If it is, I would use some kind of cooking oil. If not I use LPS 3. LPS 3 also works good for long term storage. I use it on firearms stored in my safe too.
WD-40 does a lot of things, but it does nothing well. That is what happens when you try to do a one thing does everything. If that is all you have, by all means use it.

Desert Drifter
04-06-2013, 03:34 PM
Right here...this is the best stuff for keeping carbon blades or carbon steel firearms from rusting.

Smells great...I've used it for years. It is frightfully expensive though.

http://www.theruststore.com/Renaissance-Wax-P235C80.aspx

'drif

Bax 40
04-06-2013, 03:43 PM
Food grade mineral oil is very good and cheap, mainly just wipe your knife dry and do not leave any blood on it.

I have used nose oil on my pocket knioves too when I was a kid.
Lots of old timers did that as there was not any good stainless in pocket knives back then.


Larry

PERRO
04-06-2013, 03:45 PM
I don't know if it's the best.. But,.. short of using nothing, I'm currently using " Food Grade Mineral Oil ".

Wally Mart Brand:
http://www.walmart.com/ip/Mineral-Oil-for-Cutting-Board/20590112

p.s: I recently bought some pure " Lanolin " & might give it a shot ?
http://i80.photobucket.com/albums/j161/A-PAPI/IMG_0718_zpsf297e6eb.jpg
http://www.tkbtrading.com/item.php?item_id=295

Tundra
04-06-2013, 03:45 PM
WD40 is not food grade. Just make sure you don't cut food with the knife if you go that route.
Olive oil spoils.
Renaissance is good.

Best way is to keep your blade dry and oil on occasion. I use mineral oil.

Winterhorse
04-06-2013, 03:53 PM
Okay I know this sounds nuts but if you don't ever use it for food or skinning then used engine oil works great. My grand dad always used it on his farm equipment between seasons. He tested used oil against new oil on a couple of disk harrows and used oil won hands down. You don't need much, as a mater of fact he would wipe it all off so that it seemed dry but there was probably a very thin coat left on the equipment. He also had a metal box filled with oily sand that he'd run his hoes through and stab his shovel into to clean them after he used them. I still use his tricks and everything is shiny and clean.

K Williams
04-06-2013, 03:56 PM
Eezox.

Boroffski
04-06-2013, 03:57 PM
One more for mineral oil, the laxative type. Dirt cheap, can be found at any store and won't spoil. Works good for leather sheaths as well.

wilderness
04-06-2013, 04:00 PM
I just wipe mine off and have never had a problem. I dunno!

blackhawkhunter
04-06-2013, 04:09 PM
I use Crisco.

223coyote
04-06-2013, 04:20 PM
i use coconut oil
jim

badger claw
04-06-2013, 04:57 PM
im so disappointed no has mentioned the number one choice....9 out of 10 Bushrafters agree.... bacon fat!! :36:

Thaddius Bickerton
04-06-2013, 05:02 PM
im so disappointed no has mentioned the number one choice....9 out of 10 Bushrafters agree.... bacon fat!! :36:

Ya beat me to it lol, was gonna say bacon grease.

But truth be told any cooking oil will do.

Or just keep it nice and dry if you use it regular. as a patina develops it seems to not rust. JMTC < YMMV

NorthernFrontiersman
04-06-2013, 05:03 PM
I like olive oil since it is thick like motor oil and lasts long but is all natural

Chazzle
04-06-2013, 05:25 PM
I use Bore Butter. Its food grade and consists of vegetable shortening and beeswax. I take a patch and wipe my carbon blades down if I'm not using it for an extended period of time.

Like the above poster said, using them keeps the rust off. In Peru they didn't appear to have any stainless steel knives in use down there. The fish knives, meat/game knives, and machetes I saw had a patina on it, and a shiny cutting edge from constant daily use, even near the ocean.

Chazzle

blackhawkhunter
04-06-2013, 05:36 PM
Double Tap

lucky67
04-06-2013, 05:52 PM
Almost all my knives are carbon steel, never used any rust preventative on them, never had rust on one of my knives, just keep them dry and at home out of the sheath.

Send by mobile device,grtz, Jurgen.

klammer
04-06-2013, 06:05 PM
Ballistols is great stuff. Surprised no one mentions boiled linseed oil. I use it on my fixed blades and axes, well also my anvil, swage, post vises, on and on. it drys and forms a hard layer on the surface. Great stuff needing minimal touch up...plus its also good for all your woods.

PikeMonger
04-06-2013, 06:09 PM
Canola

photobear
04-06-2013, 07:07 PM
Thanks all!

wilderness
04-06-2013, 07:14 PM
Almost all my knives are carbon steel, never used any rust preventative on them, never had rust on one of my knives, just keep them dry and at home out of the sheath.

Send by mobile device,grtz, Jurgen.

Same here ;)

grelcar
04-06-2013, 08:29 PM
A natural patina also protects the blade. Look good too.

TuhonBillMcg
04-06-2013, 08:48 PM
I don't know if it's the best.. But,.. short of using nothing, I'm currently using " Food Grade Mineral Oil ".

Wally Mart Brand:
http://www.walmart.com/ip/Mineral-Oil-for-Cutting-Board/20590112

p.s: I recently bought some pure " Lanolin " & might give it a shot ?
http://i80.photobucket.com/albums/j161/A-PAPI/IMG_0718_zpsf297e6eb.jpg
http://www.tkbtrading.com/item.php?item_id=295

I remember a magazine article many years ago on this subject, which included testing different oils and waxes. The winner was lanolin. An interesting side note was that the Vikings used to line their sword sheaths with sheep fleece to prevent rusting, the reason given in the article was that the lanolin from the wool would protect the steel.

Regards,
Bill McGrath

Avogadro
04-06-2013, 09:30 PM
Another one for mineral oil. It has little if any smell and doesn't seem to have a negative effect to my leather sheaths like petroleum based stuff. Cheap, works, no smell, compatible, food safe....not sure why I would keep looking for another solution.

S.Gossman
04-06-2013, 09:55 PM
I thought the best stuff is called elbow grease..
That is just keep the tool in use !

This does work. When not in use, I use Break Free. Leave it out of the sheath.
Scott

Mr.LCV
04-06-2013, 09:59 PM
I use to use rem oil but I have discovered, tuf-glide and whoa this stuff is for real

photobear
04-06-2013, 10:03 PM
Looks like mineral will be all I need. Thanks!

Good to know the other alternatives you've all mentioned as well.

itsKoit
04-06-2013, 10:12 PM
Call me a simpleton, but I love just plain food-grade mineral oil. I've tried different gun oils and the like, but I keep going back to that same old bottle of mineral oil.

DomC
04-10-2013, 11:09 AM
So which oil do you use to keep a carbon steel blade from rusting? Can I use WD40, or is that not a good thing to do?
I'm a fan of Renaissance Wax...expensive but very effective. Mineral oil is a more inexpensive alternative and it can also be used as honing oil for an Arkansas stone.

DomC :) ;)

wolfnotsheep
04-10-2013, 12:04 PM
I like using boiled linseed oil, as it dries up in a day or two into almost a lacquer on the blade. It's also great for oiling leather and wood.

rdec
04-10-2013, 12:27 PM
Mineral oil is food grade, cheap and sold in any drug store. Use for oiling any knife used for food prep, oiling any woodenware ditto, as well as a lubricant for hones. Useful stuff.

A trick used by ship's carpenters of old, constantly bedeviled by rust due to exposure to salt water humidity was to put block camphor in the tool chest. Many drugstores stock this since it is also used to kill moths as well as medicinal uses. It usually comes in blocks about 2" square x 1/2" thick, tightly wrapped in plastic. Make a very small slit in the plastic to let the camphor evaporate. The fumes fill the tool chest and coat everything within. Very effective. The problem, of course, is that it smells like camphor. I don't mind the smell but some do. If you are going to store tools for some period store them in a chest with a tight-fitting lid and a block or two in the bottom. Note use only camphor, not moth balls or anything less than pure camphor and be sure to wipe any moisture from the tools. I first encountered this in Rhode Island, a seafaring state, where camphor is sold in drugstore and ship's chandlers.

Another oil that can be used is jojoba oil, usually sold as a hair dressing. Jojoba oil shares a trait with sperm whale oil, it doesn't "crawl" so it stays wherever you put it and, since it is a plant, you don't have to kill whales to get it. It is also pretty inexpensive.

mountain joe
04-10-2013, 12:37 PM
I use Birch bark Oil that I extract myself

Durham
04-10-2013, 12:38 PM
Linn seed oil.

Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

Tundra
04-10-2013, 12:40 PM
I just ordered some camellia oil... will try it out.

rusty stove
04-10-2013, 12:52 PM
grape seed oil.

beacon
04-10-2013, 12:55 PM
I use this, available from Home Depot

http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/productImages/300/73/73737bb8-5d1a-41df-9204-fc45637e463f_300.jpg

KURGAN44
04-10-2013, 01:20 PM
+3 for mineral oil. I don't have to worry about contamination of foods if I use it for food prep or game prep. And like stated above, it never goes bad. Had a bottle in my fridge for 10 years at least.

vakman
04-10-2013, 02:19 PM
WD-40...hell no. Leave that in the garage with the duct tape and zip ties.

If don't use the tool every day, use linseed oil, as it will form a lasting protective coating. If you are using the tool once a day and for food, then +1 to mineral oil. If you use it multiple times per day and for food, then just use whatever fat you're cooking with, be it pork fat, olive oil, butter, etc. All works.

PERRO
04-10-2013, 02:56 PM
I know lots of folks use " Bacon Fat ", and everything had to be utilized in the past.

However, Bacon normally contains lots of " Salt " as a preservative. Unsalted Lard/Rendered Fat, might a be better option.

I personally love to eat & use " Bacon / Bacon Fat & Lard ". :4:

Lamewolf
04-10-2013, 03:17 PM
Almost all my knives are carbon steel, never used any rust preventative on them, never had rust on one of my knives, just keep them dry and at home out of the sheath.

Send by mobile device,grtz, Jurgen.

Same here except mine are kept in their sheaths. With time, carbon steel develops a natural patina and the patina protects it from rusting. I just clean and dry mine after each use.

Oh yeah, bacon fat would have salt in it that could cause rust.

altovintner
04-10-2013, 03:48 PM
Food grade mineral oil is very good and cheap, mainly just wipe your knife dry and do not leave any blood on it.

I have used nose oil on my pocket knioves too when I was a kid.
Lots of old timers did that as there was not any good stainless in pocket knives back then.


Larry

+1 for mineral oil

Sent from my Galaxy Nexus using Tapatalk 2

Tripper Harrison
04-10-2013, 04:12 PM
I use Crisco.

Bingo. Now you're cooking with peanut oil.:53:

Caper86
04-10-2013, 04:33 PM
Interesting topic.
This got me to thinking:
Could you 'season' a knife blade like you would a cast iron / carbon steel pot? I'd think it could be done during the initial heat treat while the blade is being manufactured, as I know it would have to be brought to 300-400 degrees for an hour or more.

Birch
04-10-2013, 04:35 PM
a high polish or a patina will also help prevent against rust. I opt for the patina seeing as it requires less maintenance and im a fan of the old school effect.

Boroffski
04-10-2013, 05:15 PM
Interesting topic.
This got me to thinking:
Could you 'season' a knife blade like you would a cast iron / carbon steel pot? I'd think it could be done during the initial heat treat while the blade is being manufactured, as I know it would have to be brought to 300-400 degrees for an hour or more.

Those temps would anneal the hardness and compromise the blade if done after heat treat. And heat treat would burn all of the seasoning out if done before.

The mora was a forced patina with cherry tomatoes, the BK-2 I'm going to let nature run its course.
77033

TomNickell
04-10-2013, 09:45 PM
Okay I know this sounds nuts but if you don't ever use it for food or skinning then used engine oil works great. My grand dad always used it on his farm equipment between seasons. He tested used oil against new oil on a couple of disk harrows and used oil won hands down. You don't need much, as a mater of fact he would wipe it all off so that it seemed dry but there was probably a very thin coat left on the equipment. He also had a metal box filled with oily sand that he'd run his hoes through and stab his shovel into to clean them after he used them. I still use his tricks and everything is shiny and clean.

My Grandfather did the same thing with his tools. Wipe or wash off the dirt, dry the tool, plunge into a box of sand soaked with used motor oil, and then wipe off with the special rag set aside to be used only for wiping the sand and excess oil off of the tools. He didn't use it for his knives though. And neither would I.

Durham
04-11-2013, 06:42 PM
I didn't have any honing oil to use while sharpining my axe yesterday so I mixed some rem oil with some mink oil and it worked great.

Stainz
04-12-2013, 08:53 AM
Still use mineral oil. Remember: One man's patina is another man's rust!

Stainz