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Brainchild
05-16-2013, 12:58 PM
So I know a lot of people use the sand paper and strop method to sharpen their knives but over time sandpaper loses its functionality. My question is (and I'm not a prepper per say) if you WERE to be stranded out in the wilderness what would you have to sharpen your knife in a long term situation?:6:

I'm assuming the best answer is a small wet sharpening stone?

BlakeW5
05-16-2013, 01:08 PM
So, I can have anything?

Well, I'd have to go with my DMT diamond stone. It goes against my penchant for "old-timey" methods, but I think it's the best bet. It's not the smallest thing, and wouldn't ride in a pocket well, but it's got plenty going for it.

-Doesn't need oil, and can be used dry
-Lightweight plastic core, doubt it'll shatter like a stone would if I dropped it
-It's truly flat and should stay that way
-If it clogs up, just rinse it in water

About the only issue I can think of would be the diamond abrasive eventually wearing off and that would probably take so long to happen I'd either be dead or could have found a replacement. Even then, the metal plate it's attached to should work as a rudimentary sharpener. Pick up a medium grit (around 600) and you've got the best of both worlds. Can repair a heavily damaged edge in a decent amount of time, and can hone a finished edge just enough to keep it respectably sharp.

I resisted diamond stones for a long time, but now that I've picked up a few quality ones I'm definitely loving them

demonfurbie
05-16-2013, 01:09 PM
i prefer diamond to stone for long term ... the stones can brake if dropped

like a diamond rod or a double grit diamond strop

http://www.amazon.com/DMT-FWFC-Double-Diafold-Sharpener/dp/B00004WFTW/ref=pd_sim_hi_3

Bax 40
05-16-2013, 01:15 PM
You could use the same thing they used in the old days, any stone you can find, a boot for honing etc.


Larry

Vanitas
05-16-2013, 01:15 PM
hrm, keep a stash of coffee cups imo. If you are prepping then you can drink your coffee then sharpen your knife! Ceramic tile that hasn't been sealed will work and you can cut it to the size you want. Umm, you could buy bench stones also. Any of those would work... hell you can sharpen your knife on concrete and cardboard if you are truly desperate.

Brainchild
05-16-2013, 01:25 PM
Thanks guys. I'll look into a diamond stone.

Bruce_A
05-16-2013, 02:46 PM
I use a Smith diamond sharpener. It has both a coarse and fine side and is small enough to carry in my pocket or backpack.

http://www.swords-n-stuff.com/swords/sword-care/sharpeners/smith-s-diamond-combination-knife-and-tool-sharpener.html

64duracraft
05-16-2013, 03:25 PM
Another vote for the DMT Diafold. They're light, small, and go up to an insanely high grit count.

The only thing I don't like about them is if you have a long knife they're a little short. Like a really long kitchen knife. Works great on anything else.

BlakeW5
05-16-2013, 03:42 PM
I use a Smith diamond sharpener. It has both a coarse and fine side and is small enough to carry in my pocket or backpack.

http://www.swords-n-stuff.com/swords/sword-care/sharpeners/smith-s-diamond-combination-knife-and-tool-sharpener.html

That was my first foray into diamond stones. Not sure if it's the same model, but you can pick up one like that at walmart for $15, has a coarse (325) and fine (600) side, with a "sheath" that protects the stones. Great stone for the money, I still use it for the coarse side for roughing out new bevels on knives I don't like the grind on.

megabit
05-16-2013, 03:47 PM
I sure like my spyderco dublestuff ceramic pocket stone.

http://www.walmart.com/ip/20753139?wmlspartner=wlpa&adid=22222222227000000000&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=&wl3=21486607510&wl4=&wl5=pla&veh=sem

556mp
05-16-2013, 03:49 PM
Like Larry said. You can get a knive very sharp with a stone from a stream or washout. Ive been meaning to do a video on this for a while now...

ED-E
05-16-2013, 04:02 PM
My question is (and I'm not a prepper per say) if you WERE to be stranded out in the wilderness what would you have to sharpen your knife in a long term situation?:6:
Spyderco Ceramics. Without a doubt. Large Benchstones, Sharpmaker.. or the large Fallkniven DC521.

If you're looking for a small stone: Fallkniven DC3/DC4 or the Spyderco Double Stuff Pocket Stone or both in combination (or just the Double Stuff with the DC3/4's coarse diamond side - they sell them as Fallkniven D3/D4)

In combination they should fit the bill very well and will last you for decades. From reprofiling a blade and sharpening out a chip to a hair-popping sharp edge.

Over time, even the high quality diamond stones will wear out from the diamonds fracturing or breaking loose from the matrix. Be sure to not put much pressure on your diamonds.

55dougie
05-16-2013, 05:36 PM
DC4 stone

Pekane
05-16-2013, 06:24 PM
I've experimented with using slate and bricks as water stones, and the results are pretty decent.

bushwolf
05-16-2013, 06:37 PM
DMT Diafold is a good choice for throwing in your pack.

Any flatish relatively smooth rock can be used to sharpen a convex edge, but will require a bit more skill in selection and use.

Holmesmade
05-16-2013, 06:59 PM
DMT diafold is the best bet, but I've honed several edges with a smooth rock and the edge of my car window, then stropped on my belt.

Two Bears
05-16-2013, 09:36 PM
Diamond is the only way to go for a sharpener that will last for years. Use water they will last longer.

clc79092
05-16-2013, 09:38 PM
the bottom of a ceramic coffee cup works great.

Paul Caruso
05-16-2013, 09:43 PM
I like to keep knives sharp by stropping them and not letting them get to the point that they need to be put to a stone.

I find a cheap ceramic rod takes a knife from dull to shaving sharp.

For a strop I find strop fungus works as good as anything else.

amusin
05-16-2013, 09:58 PM
any river or shoreline will provide a number of stones that'll work fine just feel them till you find one you like the grit of and use it like an axe puck.

woodsghost
05-16-2013, 10:35 PM
For a BoB, a diamond plate sharpener would be my first choice. They are flatter than a DMT stone, and made completely of metal. https://www.ragweedforge.com/SharpeningCatalog.html

For really long term, I would use a stone from the woods/creek. To get them flat, rub two relatively flat ones together, and add water to wash away the resulting powder and keep the surface soft.

If you are using a stone from the woods/creek, you will have better results if you are using carbon steel, though you can sharpen stainless this way. If you have some sort of special composite super-steel, diamond and/or ceramic may be your only real choices.

Keyser Söze
05-16-2013, 10:38 PM
http://www.bushcraftoutfitters.com/Arkansas-45-Ceramic-Sharpening-Rod-ceramic-rod-45.htm

http://www.bushcraftoutfitters.com/images/ceramic%20rod%204.5%20in.jpg Click To Enlarge


Arkansas 4.5" ceramic rod. No handle provided.
These rods are great for quick touch-ups to your knife, axe or machete. They can be placed anywhere that you may need it, and are inexpensive enough to buy several. One for your vehicle, one for the tackle box, for the backpack, saddle bags, EDC, etc.
There is no reason to not have a sharpening rod handy.






Item #: ceramic_rod_4.5

bigcknott88
05-17-2013, 05:26 AM
I use my beard

Nih
05-17-2013, 09:21 AM
Once you get proficient at freehand sharpening you can use just about anything abrasive to get a usable edge. I normally have a diamond rod with me but if I was to lose it or something I have no qualms about finding a rock to use.

Lamewolf
05-17-2013, 09:44 AM
I've carried my Lansky diamond rod for about 25 years and sharpended everything from drill bits to machetes with it !

borego
05-17-2013, 10:03 AM
i use a smith diamond sharpener. It has both a coarse and fine side and is small enough to carry in my pocket or backpack.

http://www.swords-n-stuff.com/swords/sword-care/sharpeners/smith-s-diamond-combination-knife-and-tool-sharpener.html

it's the not the best but it will work and it wont break if you drop it.

Good grip and easy to keep in you bag or pocket

DBX
05-17-2013, 11:36 AM
You could use the same thing they used in the old days, any stone you can find, a boot for honing etc.


Larry

+1 on this.

Anything that will dull your blade, will also sharpen your blade.

Takes longer to sharpen it than to dull it, though. :confused:

Sending 2 seconds from... Now!

MoxemDeliph
05-17-2013, 02:24 PM
I've had no need for bringing a sharpening stone of any kind for some time now. I'll take stick about 1" to 1.5" wide and split it, rub dirt into the grain, let it dry and then strop with it. Comes out on average to about 800 grit. I will tell you though, be sure to have no clumps of dirt or mud, just rub it into the grain and wipe away the excess. Also, let it dry for full effect...takes about a minute on a nice day. It just puts the right amount of tooth on the edge for the kind of work I do.

If theres any doubt whether its working or not, check the stick. It will load up like a natural stone and look grey and shiny as if you didn't use oil. Works great even on S30V.

For reference, I own and use a Lansky 8" fine diamond benchstone (which has lasted four years of real, consistent use as a knife maker and user), two Spyderco Sharpmakers, a Spyderco DoubleStuff, and three excellent novaculite stones from Dan's Whetstones in Arkansas. I like all of them and use them all, but for travel its the stick and mud.

Vantramp
05-17-2013, 07:09 PM
I have been pretty happy with the Fallkniven DC3. Of course it isn't a requirement given all the other possible ways to sharpen(autoglass, mugs, river rocks, boots etc), but it is nice and compact and does a great job on both SS and CS blades as well as being pretty durable.

-Mike

Pastor Chris
05-17-2013, 07:50 PM
+1 on the Fallkniven dc3. I have been obsessed with sharp for a long time and used many different methods and materials. The dc3 is really well made and combines diamond on one side and ceramic on the other. The main down side is the price. Not cheap but worth it in my opinion.

Zvire
05-17-2013, 08:04 PM
DMT Diafold !!! love those things

StoneHopper
07-23-2013, 07:39 AM
Living just a couple of miles from Smith's headquarters and having known one of the older of the Smith's when I was a teenager, guess I'm a little partial to their products. But I do use the diamond from WalMart as It gets the job done quickly.

MakeDo
07-23-2013, 07:49 AM
+1 for Smiths. I have a course/fine diamond travel sharpener that I found at Lowes. Great tool and not too big. I still prefer a stone for finishing and carry a pocket stone in my pack as well.

Fiddlehead
07-23-2013, 08:07 AM
I use the fine DMT diamond stone. The quality of the DMT's is superior and results in a fine edge. They clean with water and last a very long time.

Lamewolf
07-23-2013, 08:25 AM
My Lansky Tactical diamond rod sharpener has served me well for several years already, so I'll go with that !

Dave-the-rave
07-23-2013, 09:22 AM
I like carbon steel that'll sharpen on a rock.

Vanitas
07-23-2013, 11:31 AM
OK to add to this... fortytwoblades has there awesome little ceramic sharpening stones for only $3. Now I don't really want to tell you all because I'd like to buy more before they are gone (I already have 2) but my conscious wont allow me to be silent. They are about 1K grit according to the website. Get them while you can.

APRock
07-23-2013, 12:10 PM
In the absence of anything manufactured, river/ stream stones as mentioned by others as well as some of that fine silty mud found near these stones smeared on my pant legs makes a fine sand paper/strop alternative. Once you got it sharp enough, take a 3 or 4 inch diameter stick, split it in half and smooth the flat as best you can and smear the mud on that to make a stone alternative.

Joash
07-23-2013, 12:14 PM
Like Larry said. You can get a knive very sharp with a stone from a stream or washout. Ive been meaning to do a video on this for a while now...

Do it.

TheDoctorWho
07-23-2013, 03:38 PM
Without a doubt a (edited). I have carried mine with my everyday for over 10 years. Still have the same one. It will still put a great edge on all my knives. I have gotten it wet, it has gotten frozen in the car, it has been dropped and banged around more than any stone could ever hope to survive. It would and is my workhorse sharpener when I am in the field.

Joash
07-23-2013, 04:34 PM
Without a doubt a Gatco 60016 Tri-Seps. I have carried mine with my everyday for over 10 years. Still have the same one. It will still put a great edge on all my knives. I have gotten it wet, it has gotten frozen in the car, it has been dropped and banged around more than any stone could ever hope to survive. It would and is my workhorse sharpener when I am in the field.

What do you use when you are not in the field?

TheDoctorWho
07-23-2013, 05:33 PM
My regular 4000/8000 water stones and my oil stone. I also have an old Japanese stone that I only use for touchups on my straight razors. Nothing fancy but they get the job done.

Sent from my HTC One X using Tapatalk 4 Beta

Hiwa
07-23-2013, 06:03 PM
Eze-Lap Model M diamond rod in brass case and DC4 does every edged tool I own on a constant basis. Major work , it's the benchstones ( DMT diamond and Spyderco Ceramics) I've bought multiples of that Eze-Lap diamond rod , but still haven't wore out my first I bought a long time ago with extremely heavy use. Best 0n-the-fly sharpener for knives I've ever used . I found out they use monocrystalline and polycrystalline diamonds , and that's probably why they last so long and work with different pressures well. I can't recommend it enough.http://i657.photobucket.com/albums/uu297/ketodad/WolfLakeAug2011058-1.jpg (http://s657.photobucket.com/user/ketodad/media/WolfLakeAug2011058-1.jpg.html)

FortyTwoBlades
07-23-2013, 06:11 PM
For a field sharpener, I would saw a coarse/extra coarse (blue/black) combo DMT Diafold. My usual field sharpener is a coarse/fine (blue/red) one, but for long-term use you're much more likely to need to repair edge damage and the regular coarse is still too fine to repair an "oh $&*@" moment handily. I mean, what happens when you accidentally smash your edge into a rock? I actually wish they made and extra coarse/fine combo for that kind of purpose. Barring that I'd go with a combination of my Friedrich Dick Balkan "Rifle" steel and a coarse/medium Norton India stone. The steel does a surprisingly good job at restoring minor dings or rolls while producing a nearly shaving sharp edge and the Norton would take care of more serious damage. Both are packable in a pinch.

Joash
07-23-2013, 10:29 PM
Eze-Lap Model M diamond rod in brass case and DC4 does every edged tool I own on a constant basis. Major work , it's the benchstones ( DMT diamond and Spyderco Ceramics) I've bought multiples of that Eze-Lap diamond rod , but still haven't wore out my first I bought a long time ago with extremely heavy use. Best 0n-the-fly sharpener for knives I've ever used . I found out they use monocrystalline and polycrystalline diamonds , and that's probably why they last so long and work with different pressures well. I can't recommend it enough.http://i657.photobucket.com/albums/uu297/ketodad/WolfLakeAug2011058-1.jpg (http://s657.photobucket.com/user/ketodad/media/WolfLakeAug2011058-1.jpg.html)

That looks like the way to go, so simple.

BradGad
07-23-2013, 10:38 PM
It depends on what kind of sharps you use in the field... Scandi vs V-grind vs convex

Joash
07-23-2013, 11:10 PM
It depends on what kind of sharps you use in the field... Scandi vs V-grind vs convex

Mora

churro
07-23-2013, 11:47 PM
http://www.woodcraft.com/product/2004340/8629/dmt-credit-card-diamond-stone-extra-fine.aspx

I like these for field carry. You could mount them to something else easily enough, too.

haunted
07-24-2013, 03:44 AM
old brass handled diamond rod ezlap

Joash
07-24-2013, 11:47 AM
Eze-Lap Model M diamond rod in brass case and DC4 does every edged tool I own on a constant basis. Major work , it's the benchstones ( DMT diamond and Spyderco Ceramics) I've bought multiples of that Eze-Lap diamond rod , but still haven't wore out my first I bought a long time ago with extremely heavy use. Best 0n-the-fly sharpener for knives I've ever used . I found out they use monocrystalline and polycrystalline diamonds , and that's probably why they last so long and work with different pressures well. I can't recommend it enough.

Why do you need both the diamond rod and the DC 4? What are the pros & cons of each? If you had to choose one, which one would you choose and why?

photobear
07-24-2013, 06:02 PM
That Eze-Lap looks nice, but I'd be afraid the threads would get crossed or stripped and then I wouldn't be able to open it if I needed to. Or if my hands were really cold. I always worry about stuff that uses threads, so I stick with the simplist things possible. The less that can go wrong, the better!

Hiwa
07-25-2013, 08:39 PM
Why do you need both the diamond rod and the DC 4? What are the pros & cons of each? If you had to choose one, which one would you choose and why? Sorry for the late reply. The DC4 works better for axes , final touch after the diamond rod if necessary with the ceramic , and doing scandi edges. The rod is awesome for quick touch up and secondary bevel maintenance. If I had to chose only one , it's the Eze-lap rod. It's fast , safer as your fingers are farther away , takes away metal faster than the DC4 diamond , can do serrations in a pinch , and is very good on recurve blades and non-straight edges. It is my field tool with the DC4 , but like I said earlier , for main sharpening/reprofiling etc. it's the big stones at home. No issues with the threads getting stripped or messed up. 4 turns and it's tight because of internal o- ring. I've opened and closed it every day for over a decade , no problem.

DBX
07-26-2013, 04:24 AM
Eze-Lap ... diamond rod in brass case

I've used one (not sure what model) for over two decades. It still works well. Seems to be much finer grit now, than it was when I got it.

IF I HAD to choose only one, that'd be it.



Lather Rinse Repeat

waterman308
07-26-2013, 05:00 AM
Coffee cup bottom does a nice job actually. I grab one all the time to touch up my kitchen knives before I use them. just convenient overhead in the cubboard.

and coffee cups are everywhere :) you'll be good in the apocalypse!

photobear
07-28-2013, 02:58 PM
Eze-Lap Model M diamond rod in brass case and DC4 does every edged tool I own on a constant basis. Major work , it's the benchstones ( DMT diamond and Spyderco Ceramics) I've bought multiples of that Eze-Lap diamond rod , but still haven't wore out my first I bought a long time ago with extremely heavy use. Best 0n-the-fly sharpener for knives I've ever used . I found out they use monocrystalline and polycrystalline diamonds , and that's probably why they last so long and work with different pressures well. I can't recommend it enough.http://i657.photobucket.com/albums/uu297/ketodad/WolfLakeAug2011058-1.jpg (http://s657.photobucket.com/user/ketodad/media/WolfLakeAug2011058-1.jpg.html)

You've convinced me! Now adding the EZE-Lap to my DC4. Does it matter which material? I see they offer it now in brass or aluminum. The aluminum would be lighter, but would it be any less sturdy? Threads just as durable?

FortyTwoBlades
07-28-2013, 05:13 PM
Aluminum threads are more likely to gall while brass is fairly self-lubricating.

Thump
09-06-2013, 02:06 AM
I use the DC4 in the field and the big brother DC521 when at home. I always strop afterwards.

Ulfgrim
09-06-2013, 03:16 AM
I have a whole host of "pocket" or "belt" stones, ranging from Arkansas noviculite, to Swedish slate, the slate one riding on my belt beside my sewing kit for EDC. I just got a DC4 in the mail after doing some talking with Wood Splitter on the subject, and despite my love for natural stones, it's already becoming a fast favorite. I resist diamond stones for the most part, but with what I have coming down the pipe, I needed something better suited to be paired with my Flexxx strop instead of a file.