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Thread: Wool Blanket Anorak Extravaganza

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    Scout pik's Avatar
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    Default Wool Blanket Anorak Extravaganza

    Sources and new links (in rough order of similarity):
    Materials and approximate prices:
    • $60 = 4 Italian military blankets (Sportsman's Guide)
    • $16 = 8 sq ft 4 oz elkskin split (ebay)
    • $10 = outdoor thread, bootlaces for use with toggles
    • $3? = two used queen-sized sheets (flower pattern )



    Started off nice and easy with an outer layer based on Rick Marchand's anorak pattern (not really worth a picture, basically the same as his). I'm not exactly delighted with the result, but this step was time nevertheless well-spent in getting to know the wool and sewing machine. The machine's presser foot, in particular (old machine made for sewing tablecloths and bedsheets), wouldn't give me anything more than three layers of wool .


    Here's exercise #2, slightly more complicated, a hood design in the style of an old cotton/wool reversible anorak I saw online (pictures link to flickr; there are more pictures there):

    The two main seams are top-stitched by hand; all others are machine-sewn. (The extra seams come from fitting my design onto the scraps leftover from the Rick anorak.) I like this hood, if only because I made the design. It allows the head to turn nicely without pulling, and in general fits quite well. The only thing is that it doesn't lay nicely when it's off - kind of just retains its shape and sits awkwardly right behind the head (if it were to be attached to a jacket).


    Exercise #3 is edispilf's anorak pattern:

    This is a great pattern and tutorial from edispilf. Top-stitching makes all the difference, especially when you can do it on the machine. I extended the arms 3" and the body 2", and made the taller collar as found on edispilf's later models. I did sort of a double-top-stitch on the collar, so the wool collar is top-stitched on the outside, and the light fleece lining - cut from an old hat - is top-stitched on the inside (however, these were hand-sewn simultaneously). The result is that the seam and all related edges are hidden upward inside the collar, between the wool and fleece.


    I underestimated the strength of leather and am consequently stuck with this leather trimming thing. Perhaps 4 oz (thickness of a US quarter) wasn't necessary. My leather needle will only go through if I push it through on a board . So I'm thinking maybe poking holes with nails or something and then sewing normally using those holes. Any ideas?


    Better pictures &c. to come as this develops,
    E. Hammer
    Last edited by pik; 07-19-2012 at 10:30 PM. Reason: added new links


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    looks good mate I have to get of my ass and make one

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    Well look at you go!! Looks like an excellent start right off the bat. Lookin forward to your other posts and pics on it
    Nie pogrywaj ze mna

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    Mora junkie Rat biker Supporter Easy_rider75's Avatar
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    Excellent work Man
    I'm not one of those complicated, mixed-up cats. I'm not looking for the secret to life.... I just go on from day to day, taking what comes.~Frank Sinatra~
    bushclass 6 of 14

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    Great post Chap!! Thanks for linking the source infor aswell.

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    Dr. Fishguts Bush Class Basic Certified kgd's Avatar
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    Great stuff, looking forward to seeing more of your work!

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    Bushmaster Supporter Mtnfolk Mike's Avatar
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    very cool.. great post..
    >>>---LIFE IS A KNIFE---->

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    Great post! It is my plan to give this a shot soon. Thanks for linking it all together.

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    WOW DUDE!!!! Great work!! Thanks for putting it all together..

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    Excellent post. For the leather trim, you'd probably be better using an awl to make the holes first and then hand stitch. Do no more then five holes at a time though, then stitch these, then do five more holes. That way you will have a LOT more control as the stitching holds it in place behind and you only need worry about the five holes in front.

    If an awl isn't convenient, then try using glover's needles. These are very sharp and have a triangular point to them, so they go through leather much easier than a conventional round needle.

    Have fun, good luck and keep us posted.

    Eric

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