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Thread: What is THE BUSHCRAFT KNIFE

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    Default What is THE BUSHCRAFT KNIFE

    I am curious to know how others define a "bushcraft" knife. I define the Bushcraft knife as a tool with a 5-3" blade and 5-3" handle, Drop, clip, or spear point. 1 1/4 - 3/4 wide and 3/32 - 3/16 thick. Scandi, convex, flat or hollow grinds are fine

    IMO a bushcraft knife must be able to preform craft needs, skinning, traps and triggers, fire sticks,preparing my meal,etc. Not chopping wood( not meaning the splitting of small branches for a fire), hunting bears, blazing trails or building log homes.


    I typically make knives that I would use and that work very well for my bushcraft needs and knowledge. This the normal outline or blank I make to begin a new bush knife. I like it because after hours of of using many knives this is the most comfortable in the hand and on the hip.I am not saying that a bushcraft knife must look like mine either.

    So if you are a knife maker (amateur or professional) let me know what you think a bushcraft knife is and is not, and what shapes you like and why.

    If you are a user of a bushcraft style but not a maker plz say so and let me know what you think a bushcraft knife is and is not, and what shapes you like and why.

    I am also placing this on 2 other forums just to see what answers I get. If you comment on any of them please dont duplicate your response on the other 2 forums. Dont want the "jedi mind trick" coming into play as some ppl have more sway with their comments.

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    honestly i believe what ever knife you use for bushcraft is a bushcraft knife. If i was to pick it would be a mears clone. or one i made. I prefer drop point, convex, carbon, and about 3 to 5 inches.

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    Oooh, I really like the proportions on that handle. Very nice.

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    For me:

    4 inch blade, scandi or convex, carbon steel, about 4mm thick whatever that comes to

    But you use what you got if if works for you.
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    I think of a Mora, Woodlore, or something along those lines. Like Koa said, 4-5" blade, scandi or convex, carbon steel.

    To me the big Beckers, Busses, Trailmasters, Kukris, Tracker Knives, etc are more Bushwacking than Bushcraft. They're kind of like using a chainsaw to carve a fuzzstick. Not that they don't have their uses, but they're not really a craft knife.

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    The Bushcraft knife is, to my taste as a "user not a maker", from 3' to 7 or 8" blade length. I go to the longer length because of the Finnish Leuku style, which I have found very versatile.
    The Leuku blade also has a bit more depth, and a medium thickness spine. I can carve with it at need, and it is an awesome game knife.

    The smaller range of blade- 3 to 5 inch, are light, easily carried and versatile. I however have a large hand, and many of them are designed so that the small grip area cramps my hand. I have just gotten a Turley Dogwood with a bit larger -longer- grip, and it is a revelation. It has a thick spine, 4 1/4 inch blade, and a fairly deep belly, and approaches my current ideal of an all around blade style.

    The design you show above is well within my set of preferences, but I would need at least a 1/2 inch longer hilt.

    I find that the longer hilt is still usable by those with smaller hands, and it makes my grip much more comfortable. It might be an option worth having, for those who need it.
    Nemo me impune lacessit !

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    "IMO a bushcraft knife must be able to preform craft needs, skinning, traps and triggers, fire sticks,preparing my meal,etc. Not chopping wood( not meaning the splitting of small branches for a fire, hunting bears, blazing trails or building log homes.)"

    perfectly put! nice design you got working there as well.

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    Good question and one that has been on my mind since I am wanting a good bush craft knife.

    I am always keeping my eye open for the perfect bushcraft knife blade style. I feel it is a little longer and wider than what you are describing but something we rarely see from knife makers or manufacturers.

    If I was a knife maker (and I plan on pursuing the trade as time and money permits) I would say a blade of about 5 to 7 cutting inches long, 1 and a half inches wide and a little thicker than what is typically seen. The Tom Brown Tracker is 1/4 inches thick probably more than is needed but many are not thick enough. 3/8 of an inch would be good. Has to be full tang and have solid scales of hard wood or micarta or other tough as nails material.

    So far the P Moore T-Rex is pretty close to the perfect bush knife. I like the Fallkniven survival knife but would like to see it a little beefer like on steroids as mentioned above for the perfect bush knife. Its like all the manufacturers skimp on the steel and size width and length.
    What I am trying to say is there is an intermediate knife size between the typical cold steel, fallkiniven, mora or other and that of the large kukri or bowie or machete style of large knives that hasn't been seen too often that I feel would make the perfect bush knife.

    I bought a Kershaw Outcast a while ago and while not the best knife in the world, I feel it is great for certain things but it is too big overall for the ideal bush craft knife.
    A scaled down version of that knife would be cool, or a scaled up version of the typical smaller hunter or skinner or spear point knives typically seen would be good.

    I know this was long winded but you asked Something I am pretty passionate about. This is why I want to someday make what I think is the perfect bush knife.

    cheers
    Last edited by Ironwood; 08-14-2010 at 12:03 PM.

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    Default My Idea of a Bushcraft Knife

    I'm a simple man who likes to keep things simple. For me any knife has the potential to be a bushcraft knife as long as it meets a few criteria.

    1) Will it's weight or size be a hindrance to your moving in the bush (weight makes it burdensome or constantly gets snagged in thickets)?

    2) Can it be easily sharpened to a good edge in the field?

    3) Is the grip solid in YOUR hand (not the maker's) without sacrificing comfort (a knife is no good if it hurts to use it)?

    4) Is the blade solidly attached to the handle / scales (no movement whatsoever)?

    5) Do you have to mortgage your house to buy it (will you be suicidal if you loose / break it)?

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    This works for me :




    By pitdog2010 at 2010-08-04

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