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Thread: Building a pole barn.

  1. #1
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    Default Building a pole barn.

    I didn't know where to post this or even if I should post this. But its what I'm up to at the moment so I thought what the heck.

    We need another out building for goats and equipment and whatnot. I'm laid off at the present time so I decided to build a small pole barn. I'm using rough cut hemlock lumber from a local two man sawmill. When you buy this type of lumber a 2x4 is really 2in. by 4in. its green, not kiln dried, and heavy as all get out. But using rough cut hemlock is much much cheaper than buying from a retail lumber yard. And I like supporting the small local business.

    The building is 18ft wide and 24ft long. So far the only tools Ive used are a post hole digger,spud bar, hammer, axe, sledgehammer,chainsaw,level,square,chalk line,and a tape measure. The only power tool is the chain saw.
    Ive got 2x8x18 foot planks ordered to span the roof. Its going to be a job getting them up there.
    Im no carpenter by a long shot, is the building in square,,,,,no its not,,,is it close,,,,not really , but it is close enough to be water tight and last longer than I will, so its good to go.

    Some 4x6x15 footers, fun moving them around single handed.

    View from the front, run in door for livestock will be on the left.



    Thanks for looking.
    Last edited by saxon; 10-14-2010 at 04:20 PM.

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    Scout Old Forester's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by saxon View Post
    But using rough cut hemlock is much much cheaper than buying from a retail lumber yard. And I like supporting the small local business.------- and last longer than I will, so its good to go.
    Hope you took a few precautions. Contrary to some, Hemlock is not very rot resistant.
    http://www.dominionfences.com/choose_material.htm
    O.F.

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    Scout Supporter rasp181's Avatar
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    Well, after the fact, like Old Forester said hemlock isn't the best choice for putting in the ground untreated but otherwise it's looking very good. When I was a kid we used a lot of green cut oak for hay mangers, barn stall, etc. One trick Dad always used for nailing green wood was to put the nails in a coffee can with used motor oil, made the nails drive easier. Now you need to start thinking about building a retreat cabin!!!
    Sometimes life just kicks you in the Butt, get up and kick back!!!

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    Looking good so far!

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    Thanks for the comments guys. Good point about the rot resistance of hemlock. I treated the poles before putting them in. Tarred them. But on the other hand I have animal shelters made of hemlock poles that are 12 years old and doing fine so far. Heck I have sassafras fence posts that are 7 years old and still strong. Also has a lot to do with the type of soil and drainage.

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    Scout woodrat's Avatar
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    hemlock is not very rot resistant, but if you tarred the ends, that will help, and you're right, how long they'll last has a lot to do with the particular site.

  7. #7
    siteturbo
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    FYI, For those of you interested, there is a bulletin board (forum) dedicated directly to barns at www.BarnsBB.com :-)

    One cool thing is that they have a moderator that is a Professional Engineer that peeks in from time to time and answers questions about designs and construction.

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    Tracker ootter's Avatar
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    Looks good! I'm building a wood fired sauna with similar framing. I make my living as a carpenter and its kind of refreshing to build something without worrying about square, level or plumb. I personally wouldn't worry too much about the rot resistance of the poles. I have an old sheep barn built with untreated or peeled fir poles sunk directly into the ground that is still perfectly sound after 23 years. Another trick I was told about by Steve Chappel of Fox Maple post and Beam is to bury posts upside down, in other words bury the upper part of the tree. He said it improves the rot resistance because water doesn't travel through the wood top to bottom as well. I guess that's what farmers used to do with fence posts.

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