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Thread: Homemade Knife from Circular Saw Blade

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    Default Homemade Knife from Circular Saw Blade

    I looked around for a place to post this. If there is a better place, please let me know.

    I read elsewhere how it is possible to make a knife from a circular saw blade.

    I thought I would give it a go, since I had an old saw blade, and some time today.



    My dremel and a metal cutting disk did a great job. Having finished one, I decided to try another style, plus a small blade I hope to use as part of a carving set.



    The one in the middle seems to fit my hand the best. There is nothing new here as far as a design. I basically followed a tried and true pattern for a sheath knife.

    I really don't know what kind of steel it is, but a bastard file can work the metal. Does this mean it will need to be hardened more? Can you help me out with this, I am real "green" about metal work and hardening steel.

    Thanks,
    Luke DeBee

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    Looking forward to watching this project progress!

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    this is cool. can you do a video? just askin..

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    Quote Originally Posted by tjwilhelm View Post
    Looking forward to watching this project progress!
    me too, like the look of all of them.

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    Looks like a good project. All 3 look like they could be useful.

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    I cant tell from the photo, but if the blade has carbide teeth then the steel is not ideal for a cutting tool. In most cases particular blades can be made in to good knives but with so many blades out there its hard to find the good ones. You need the older type or a new one that is not just hardened on the teeth.

    Best bet IMO would be to heat treat it again before you grind the bevels and see just how it dose. Because the steel is relatively thin you wont have a whole lot of work to do while its hard. If you grind it first you will have to leave the edge a bit thick to prevent overheating using primitive hardening techniques. Myself not knowing what type of steel it is would heat until a magnet docent stick to it and slightly longer then quench in mineral oil, fallow that up with a temper at 450 deg in your oven at home. You can reach the heat you need to harden it in a BBQ with charcoal and an air supply, blow drier, air compressor, bellows, or even a tube to blow, but don't inhale!.

    If that docent seem like an option then just work it as it is and see if it will take and hold an edge or sharpen part that you dident use and see how well it dose.

    A friend of mine makes his carving tools from masonry nails, they are hard already and he just files then to shape and sharpens them up, they work great.

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    I like the idea and have thought about it myself. I wish we knew what kind of steel is was. I will be watching with interest. Thanks.

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    I hope it works out buddy! good idea, look forward to seeing more of it!

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    Nice looking knives. Good for you on using existing materials. I agree with SOL above, if the blade has carbide teeth added to a steel blade it probably won't heat treat. Looks good though. Inspiring.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Son of liberty View Post
    I cant tell from the photo, but if the blade has carbide teeth then the steel is not ideal for a cutting tool. In most cases particular blades can be made in to good knives but with so many blades out there its hard to find the good ones. You need the older type or a new one that is not just hardened on the teeth.

    Best bet IMO would be to heat treat it again before you grind the bevels and see just how it dose. Because the steel is relatively thin you wont have a whole lot of work to do while its hard. If you grind it first you will have to leave the edge a bit thick to prevent overheating using primitive hardening techniques. Myself not knowing what type of steel it is would heat until a magnet docent stick to it and slightly longer then quench in mineral oil, fallow that up with a temper at 450 deg in your oven at home. You can reach the heat you need to harden it in a BBQ with charcoal and an air supply, blow drier, air compressor, bellows, or even a tube to blow, but don't inhale!.

    If that docent seem like an option then just work it as it is and see if it will take and hold an edge or sharpen part that you dident use and see how well it dose.

    A friend of mine makes his carving tools from masonry nails, they are hard already and he just files then to shape and sharpens them up, they work great.
    Thanks...
    The old blade doesn't seem to have carbine on the tips. A medium bastard file shaped the saw blade tips with out much trouble. Would this be the case if it was a carbide tip? I put an edge on this steel to test it. It cut well into oak, but the edge didn't hold.

    So my conclusion is that I will make this into an good old lesson in the school of life. I plan to follow up with some more shaping, and then try my hand at hardening this unknown steel using the magnet test. Why learn something from this.

    One step at a time....

    Comments and insights most welcome.

    Luke DeBee

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