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Thread: Pine Sap

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    Scout Supporter BuckHorn's Avatar
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    Default Pine Sap

    I know this sounds weird but is pine sap edible?And if it is,is it good? Im asking this because I ove the way it smells. It seems to me like you could eat it. Any help would be great.

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    Guide Supporter VinoNoir's Avatar
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    This should help: http://youtu.be/dxxflpu3rTQ
    "..honest to the point of recklessness,
    self centered to the extreme.."

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    Pine from what I have read and heard was not the sap to chew of choice, but spruce was.

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    Bushmaster Vendor Adahy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BuckHorn View Post
    I know this sounds weird but is pine sap edible?And if it is,is it good? Im asking this because I ove the way it smells. It seems to me like you could eat it. Any help would be great.
    I was wondering that myself. I know the inner bark is edible they say.

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    Wow This Post brings memories, My Grand Father made Me and My Brother Pine Gum, Thanks for the Post BuckHorn I'll Have to make some time for My Grand Daughter's
    “The longest journey of any person is the journey inward”

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    From what I was told is that pine sap was added in home mad soap for an antiseptic.
    I will do some research on this, and if this is false please correct me

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    Tracker Aussie123's Avatar
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    I have never tried this, but apparently others have (no mention of any specific tree or any more details):

    “You find a hardened, crystallized piece of pine sap and cut off a small chunk, about the size of a marble. Then you start chewing. It crumbles in your mouth, sticks to your teeth, and tastes like Pine-Sol. It's really terrible. You start salivating and so you spit and spit and spit for the next few minutes. Then, like magic, the crumbly sap turns into gum that tastes of alpine air and pine trees.”

    I have tasted some fresh pine sap locally (just a dab on my finger), quite astringent and not too bad. It certainly gave a clean mouth taste.
    I do eat small chunks of wattle sap (acacia) – generally before it sets rock hard. Break off a small chunk and suck it, keeping it away from teeth. After a few minutes it turns to a sort of jell. My local trees don’t seem to have much flavour and the tannins are mild, but occasionally you find a very tannic (bitter) sap which I spit out. Apparently there are some which are sugar sweet, but I’ve yet to find one of those.

    If you have fillings or bad teeth, just be careful – perhaps try and suck small pieces rather than crunching it up ?
    I’ll be interested to see if anyone else has tried.

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    Used to chew it all the time as a kid.

    Chewing sap from fir, pine and juniper is old as dirt.

    Pine resin is hard when it is dry, but it will soften with heat. So keep it in your mouth or heat it while you cook your lunch. You can chew pine and fir resin (the right kind) for staving off the common cold (according to the common wisdom at least) and it also keeps your teeth clean.

    Pine resin chewed for dental health is what inspired some dentist in the 1800:s to invent Stomatol mouth wash. Using the terpenoids from pine resin as the active ingredient. Pine resin is upwards to 85% "harts", meaning terpenoids, acids and such. The rest is the etherical oils so to speak. Used for incense and smelly oils.

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    nice to know. I 'd heard it was an antiseptic and could be used for minor burns ( havent tried that) or small cuts. A taxidermist friend kept turpentine in his shop for nicks and cuts he got fleshing out hides. He never had a problem with infections or other problems.

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    You can use it for all kinds of remedies, as well as adhesive, making tar and a slew of other stuff.

    Boiling tar is allot nastier than steeping sap and adding it to brandy for poultices though. I suspect though that there was allot of "sampling" of the poultice going on back then.

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