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Thread: Point Blankets...anyone have one?

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Puffer View Post
    The Pendleton's are GREAT blankets BUT a whole lot LIGHTER
    That actually depends on which Pendleton you are referring to. They make an amazing variety of blankets in a number of weights. One of their thickest weights (forgive me as I cannot recall the name under which it is marketed) compares favorably with a best Hudsons Bay. Some of their lightest blankets would almost be termed a woolen bed sheet, and then there seem to be two other weights in between those.

    The only reason I know this is because the mill is about a 45 minute drive from our house, and we visit fairly frequently to purchase seconds. A Pendleton second can be marked as such for things like color variation, shortness in length (3/4" makes it a second1), thin spots (we avoid those), or any of a myriad of reasons.

    Since the blankets are actually produced at that mill, we feel assured that we know exactly what we are getting, whether seconds or first quality. Granted, it is far more money than an Italian wool blanket, but I have to write that comparing one of those with some of the upper end Pendletons and claiming the surplus blanket is better seems a bit optimistic at best. Heck, there is a weight of blanket sold by Pendleton which I didn't mention that would better serve as a rug!

    All that being written, I cannot claim one brand is better than another. I own four Early's, a couple of Woolrich (Civil War series), and perhaps a half dozen Pendletons. There are also a few no-name wool blankets around the house. I love 'em all and would be hard pressed to pick one out as my favorite, but if it were necessary there is a particular Pendleton that would be my reluctant first choice (wouldn't want to leave any behind ya understand!).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Otony View Post
    That actually depends on which Pendleton you are referring to. They make an amazing variety of blankets in a number of weights. One of their thickest weights (forgive me as I cannot recall the name under which it is marketed) compares favorably with a best Hudsons Bay. Some of their lightest blankets would almost be termed a woolen bed sheet, and then there seem to be two other weights in between those.

    The only reason I know this is because the mill is about a 45 minute drive from our house, and we visit fairly frequently to purchase seconds. A Pendleton second can be marked as such for things like color variation, shortness in length (3/4" makes it a second1), thin spots (we avoid those), or any of a myriad of reasons.

    Since the blankets are actually produced at that mill, we feel assured that we know exactly what we are getting, whether seconds or first quality. Granted, it is far more money than an Italian wool blanket, but I have to write that comparing one of those with some of the upper end Pendletons and claiming the surplus blanket is better seems a bit optimistic at best. Heck, there is a weight of blanket sold by Pendleton which I didn't mention that would better serve as a rug!

    All that being written, I cannot claim one brand is better than another. I own four Early's, a couple of Woolrich (Civil War series), and perhaps a half dozen Pendletons. There are also a few no-name wool blankets around the house. I love 'em all and would be hard pressed to pick one out as my favorite, but if it were necessary there is a particular Pendleton that would be my reluctant first choice (wouldn't want to leave any behind ya understand!).
    Stand "corrected" Thank You

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    If it's of any use, I have a feeling that the pendleton and hbc situations in canada and usa are reversed. Up here the real pendleton trading robes seen at pow wows and such are mucho dinero but you can score Early's in their various brands fairly reasonably, whilst if what Ive seen on ebay is any indication, the hbc's and the like are expensive down in the us and pendletons are quite expensive up here and used ones almost never encountered for sale.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Strider View Post
    If it's of any use, I have a feeling that the pendleton and hbc situations in canada and usa are reversed. Up here the real pendleton trading robes seen at pow wows and such are mucho dinero but you can score Early's in their various brands fairly reasonably, whilst if what Ive seen on ebay is any indication, the hbc's and the like are expensive down in the us and pendletons are quite expensive up here and used ones almost never encountered for sale.
    I believe you are completely correct in this regard. I note that Pendleton makes an incredible variety of trading robes based on authentic originals in their collection, which are wildy popular on the pow-wow circuit. And just as with any other product, perceived desirability makes for higher prices.

    If it is easier to obtain, as blankets are around here, it is simply going be less expensive. I passed on a good used Pendleton at a thrift shop the other day because I didn't feel like spending the 55 bucks they were asking. It was a good deal, heck a great deal considering the quality of the blanket, but I wanted to spend even less. Such is the "perceived desirability" when living so close to the mill I guess.

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    Being fairly new to this forum, I have observed that the high level of activity here on the forum has kept me talking about wool blankets an awful lot. That is fine.

    Like some of the other folks here, I own a large number of Early's Witney Point and Hudson Bay blankets. As Wolfy mentioned in an earlier post, many of the Hudson Bay blankets were made by Witney at one time. The Witney Blanket Story http://witneyblanketstory.org.uk/WBP...orth%20America

    Not only do I (we) own many fine Early's Witney Point blankets, but I own several capotes (hooded coat, if you will), matchcoats, pullover shirts, and winter leggings all made from Early's Witney Point blankets.

    The difference between a good, well taken care of, Early's Witney Point blanket and a military blanket in terms of warmth is, day and night. I think we own most of the surplus military blankets out there (purchased for projects) and NONE compare in warmth. The Witney's thick PURE NEW WOOL, and construction methods make it a superior blanket.

    Only one manufacturer of blankets that I prefer over either Witney or Hudson Bay blankets; this is my blankets hand-woven by CJ Wilde of Wilde Weavery. My preference is slight here since I have spent many a night under an Early's Witney Point in the snow-covered mountains all snug and content.

    BTW, in temperatures less than cool and mild, we serious blanket users like to use TWO blankets. When folded properly, this allows for two layers of blanket under the body, two over. Wearing a wool stocking cap and wool socks under the blanket (s) will allow the whole experience to be a pleasant one.

  7. #26
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    OK, all you blanket freaks out there may be interested in reading a book by Harold Tichenor entitled "The Blanket, an illustrated history of the Hudson's Bay Point Blanket". It is available from the Museum of the Fur Trade in Chadron, Nebraska. It was produced for the Hudson's Bay Company and has a myriad of photos of the blankets themselves and the lables affixed to them throughout history as well as a documented history of the companies involved in their production.

    The discussion of weight versus warmth has much to do with the length of the wool fibres themselves. The longer the fibers the more durable they are for the amount of airspace between the fibers. Many of the military blankets are recycled wool that in order to be more durable must be made heavier and thicker. Their airspaces are tighter together and not as large as with the virgin wool, hence the need for more actual fibers to make up the difference.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wolfy View Post
    OK, all you blanket freaks out there may be interested in reading a book by Harold Tichenor entitled "The Blanket, an illustrated history of the Hudson's Bay Point Blanket". It is available from the Museum of the Fur Trade in Chadron, Nebraska. It was produced for the Hudson's Bay Company and has a myriad of photos of the blankets themselves and the lables affixed to them throughout history as well as a documented history of the companies involved in their production.

    The discussion of weight versus warmth has much to do with the length of the wool fibres themselves. The longer the fibers the more durable they are for the amount of airspace between the fibers. Many of the military blankets are recycled wool that in order to be more durable must be made heavier and thicker. Their airspaces are tighter together and not as large as with the virgin wool, hence the need for more actual fibers to make up the difference.
    Thanks! I'll check that book out.
    I love my old HBC four point...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Puffer View Post
    Antig, perhaps this will assist. In the BP/ML community these "blankets" are a "mainstay"

    1. As already mentioned, Until recently, Early's Witney was the "prime maker "of HBC's Point blankets.
    2. In my experience no other blanket compares ( including the older Amer. "point blankets', which were smaller & lighter wt.)
    3. What do the "points mean ?? ) - Size & wt. here is a chart-

    4. Dating can be ascertained by the Label.

    As to value = CONDITION. If in GREAT condition , then a 4 pt. @ $110.00 is a good $$

    I own 4 blankets ( 3 4pts & 1 3pt ( used reg on my bed & in the "field") & my Capote is made from a 4pt.



    Puffer
    That is great info to share, to know what each one of those blankets weighed new would be some great additional information.

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    Have a Whitney Ganagaro 4 point and I love it. Have had for maybe 10-12 years. Spent many a below freezing night on the trail with just it a capote and hand sewn hemp ground cloth!

  11. #30
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    pointblanket_zpsb61beb98.jpg

    A peek at mine which currently on the bed, its cold these days.

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