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Thread: Difference between wool and reprocessed wool?

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    Default Difference between wool and reprocessed wool?

    Came across a USGI wool blanket. Says it is 65% wool and 35% reprocessed wool.

    What is the difference? Is it still the equlivent of a 100% wool blanket, or is it somehow inferior?

    Thanks.

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    I'm not sure but reprocessed (I'm guessing) probably lost just a bit of its insulative properties because I'm guessing that means it's used and that means it's probably compressed a bit. Probably just as good though.

    PS. don't reference this or anything, it's probably wrong.

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    Check this out;

    Quote> recycling of wool (in wool (fibre))
    ...wool, or, in the United States, as virgin wool. The limited world supply results in the use of recovered wools. In the United States, wool recovered from fabric never used by the consumer is called reprocessed wool; wool recovered from material that has had use is called reused wool. Recovered wools, employed mainly in woolens and blends, are often of inferior quality because of damage suffered...<Quote

    http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/...processed-wool

    Ya get what you pay for.............If the price is right, your call.

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    Reprocessed wool is wool that was made into fabric or felted but never used by the consumer market. An example would be the trimmings from wool fabric when coats are being made is reused to make fabric. Those trimmings are reprocessed wool. It is mixed with virgin wool to make woolen fabric.

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    I think it would be just fine. I really don't see how it could make the product any inferior as far as quality goes. It it did it would be such a low amount that you couldn't tell. They are just wool fibers mixed in with other wool fibers

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    I have one and it is my favorite wool blanket (I only have a USGI one and a gray one). The USGI one is lighter and feels better on the skin (less itchy). The only problem is it has ALOT of um......little balls of wool forming on the blanket....not sure what to call them, but they are all over the blanket making it look used/worn out.

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    The limited world supply results in the use of recovered wools.
    Limited world supply? Wool doesn't pay the shearing cost in this country any more, and is sold for house insulation. Some breeds' (admittedly low-grade) raw wool sells for 7 pence a kilo. When wool was in demand a few decades ago it would pay tenant farmers' rent on its own. Limited supply my backside. Maybe it's a historical thing.

    Here endeth the thread-veering rant.

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    I hear you Matt. Wool here is a farming expense, not an income component. The only guys that are really making it with wool production are the merino guys who are marketing to the end users (italian suit makers) on their own behalf. Some of them are making out like bandits. Anything going thro' the normal auction process isn't making it.

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    There is a big difference between virgin wool and reprocessed wool--with a significant price gap to boot. Virgin wool is fresh wool that has not been processed and the fibers are much longer. It is also very soft and the nap has more fluff. Reprocessed wool is made from short fibers or trimmings and it is what gives wool the reputation of being "scratchy".

    Usually reprocessed wool blankets go for the $20-$40 range while virgin wool blankets are around $160-$200. Warmth wise, my virgin wool Hudson Bay blanket is about the warmth of 2-3 100% wool Italian surplus blankets layered on top of each other.

    Sorry---got carried away and forgot to answer your question. In summary, the less reprocessed wool, the better!

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    wildernut
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    Quote Originally Posted by Antig View Post
    There is a big difference between virgin wool and reprocessed wool--with a significant price gap to boot. Virgin wool is fresh wool that has not been processed and the fibers are much longer. It is also very soft and the nap has more fluff. Reprocessed wool is made from short fibers or trimmings and it is what gives wool the reputation of being "scratchy".

    Usually reprocessed wool blankets go for the $20-$40 range while virgin wool blankets are around $160-$200. Warmth wise, my virgin wool Hudson Bay blanket is about the warmth of 2-3 100% wool Italian surplus blankets layered on top of each other.

    Sorry---got carried away and forgot to answer your question. In summary, the less reprocessed wool, the better!
    Exactly right, I can only add this, even with wool called "virgin" there is a huge range of quality with a number of factors driving it. From the variety of the sheep producing the fiber, to the age and diet of the animal, to the skill of the shearer, to the ability of the processer turning the raw fiber into roving , to the spinner or weaver of the yarn. And thats before man or machine starts knitting it into a final product.

    Lots of steps to turn a sheeps hair into a blanket or socks. And I didn't even touch on the dyeing proccess and how that can effect things.

    All virgin wool is not created equal.

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