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Thread: removing scent glands

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    Default removing scent glands

    I have been looking for info on where the scent gland are on a deer and other animals like coons.I have killed lot of deer and coon to eat but I always wind up throwing it out because it has that tainted taste to it.I have looked and looked for videos on this but have found none.Even onpork beef there are scent glands.that would make meats taste better if one knew where these are

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    The scent glands on a white tail are located on the inside and outside of the rear legs. Cut them out first thing after hanging your tag and before field dressing.

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    Guide Bush Class Basic Certified sons of scotland's Avatar
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    honestly, no you should not mess with them, the less you play around with those glands, the better off you are gonna be. Getting any of the gland secretions on any of the meat is gonna make it taste gamey. If, you do decide to remove the tarsal glands wash the knife that you use before field dressing or butchering your deer, or use another knife that has not touched the glands, Also wash your hands after handling the tarsal glands. Deer urinate on their glands. There is bacteria on these glands and you don't want to spread this to the meat.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sons of scotland View Post
    honestly, no you should not mess with them, the less you play around with those glands, the better off you are gonna be. Getting any of the gland secretions on any of the meat is gonna make it taste gamey. If, you do decide to remove the tarsal glands wash the knife that you use before field dressing or butchering your deer, or use another knife that has not touched the glands, Also wash your hands after handling the tarsal glands. Deer urinate on their glands. There is bacteria on these glands and you don't want to spread this to the meat.
    I agree 100%. One thing I do on squirrels is to remove the nasty little tan glands in their armpits....I don't see that mentioned in tutorials, but it's worth it.

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    Scout Supporter Katdaddy's Avatar
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    I have dressed a lot of deer and never tried to remove the glands. I have seem quite a few articles in outdoor mags which recommend against it.
    How do you mean the meat is tainted?

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    I don't remove the scent glands on a deer unless I'm taking them into the field as bait, and I don't do that. But, I do be careful not to touch them when cleaning the deer. If I touch them I wipe off my hands and knife real good before touching the meat. They look like a darker greasy patch of hair by the rear "knees" of the deer.

    I honestly don't know if it will taint the meat, but they do stink, so...

    I also remove the brown fatty stuff in the armpits of a squirrel, and the scent glands which are on the forelegs just rear of the wrist and appear as a few extra long hairs which remain sometimes after the squirrel is skinned. I just cut down under the hairs and remove that whole little section where they are attached to the flesh.

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    I've never messed with scent glands in any deer I killed & never had an issue with my meat being tainted. In my own experience overly gamey flavor comes from improper field dressing. Field dress the animal right where it lays rather than moving it to another location.
    Just my own experience and two cents. YMMV

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    Quote Originally Posted by Malleus View Post
    I've never messed with scent glands in any deer I killed & never had an issue with my meat being tainted. In my own experience overly gamey flavor comes from improper field dressing. Field dress the animal right where it lays rather than moving it to another location.
    Just my own experience and two cents. YMMV

    X2 Best Advise I can give is field dress your game promply and cool it down as quick as possible. Also shot placement is key, meaning do not gut shoot it. And in the field dressing try not to cut or puncher any of the guts. Clean your blade periodiacly as you work also.

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    I grew up in a deer hunting family and understood from early age that it was necesary to remove the tarsal and metatarsal glands prior to skinning.

    Now, several decades later, I can report that removing the glands makes no difference in the taste of venison. I butcher as soon as possible and no longer bother with the glands.

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    Wow... I've never met anyone who DIDN'T remove the glands, especially from a buck, before even gutting it. I don't worry so much about does, but bucks are nasty!
    The main glands are located (as mentioned) in the inside rear knee.

    It's not so much that leaving them on is going to somehow "infect" the meat. But if they are left on there is a good possibility that the secretions can come in contact with the meat, or your hands when skinning the animal. I've killed some bucks in full rut, and the "juice" was actually running down their legs!
    I pinch the skin above the gland, and pull as I cut through the hide. Take as much hide as you need to, to keep from coming in contact with the gland itself. So far I've never cut one, or got any stuff on my hands or knife.

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