Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 28

Thread: Can you eat Hickory nuts?

  1. #1
    Tracker
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    54
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default Can you eat Hickory nuts?

    I have a huge hickory tree that got knocked over in hurricane Irene.... now I am wondering, can you eat Hickory nuts?

  2. #2
    Bushmaster Bush Class Basic Certified tennecedar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    6,034
    Thanks
    5,930
    Thanked 5,247 Times in 1,525 Posts

    Default

    Oh Yeah!

    Best when the nut hits the ground on it's own. I will tell ya the work is worth it. A dental pick helps get them out. I love it when the wife makes zucchini bread with them.

  3. #3
    Scout
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    526
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 87 Times in 37 Posts

    Default

    You are honestly asking if you can eat hickory nuts when you live in a place where they grow?
    Best food God ever made, after pecans (whack is a type of hickory).
    Crush the nuts, shell and all. Dump the bunch in a bucket of water. Shells sink, nuts float ( or the other way around, I've been in the army or lived in California too long, can't remember) but that's an easy way to get them separate them.
    I lived on hickory nuts and rabbits growing up. We weren't so poor thats all we had to eat but we ate a lot of it and it's all I liked as a kid, plus Bruusels sprouts and broccoli.

  4. #4
    Tracker
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    54
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    So let me get this right, you get that green smelly fruit thing off of the tree that looks like a crab apple, bust it open and eat the nut in the middle? What does it taste like?

  5. #5
    Bushmaster Bush Class Basic Certified tennecedar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    6,034
    Thanks
    5,930
    Thanked 5,247 Times in 1,525 Posts

    Default

    They are probably still too green right now. When hickory nuts are ready the outer hull will split open revealing the nut. They have a distinctive smell in the outer hull. The inside nut is alot like a pecan but it has it's own flavor.

  6. #6
    Scout Bush Class Basic Certified
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Vinton Ia.
    Posts
    725
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 70 Times in 47 Posts

    Default

    Been eatin them for years.

  7. #7
    Guide Bush Class Basic Certified nothinghead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Longing for the north woods
    Posts
    3,456
    Thanks
    2,123
    Thanked 2,365 Times in 655 Posts

    Default

    I just found one yesterday on a hike. Lots of black walnuts too. I'll have to give it a try.

  8. #8
    Scout
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Haslett, Michigan
    Posts
    419
    Thanks
    28
    Thanked 683 Times in 142 Posts

    Default

    Greetings All,

    It's true that the genus of hickories, Carya, include some really incredible edible nuts. And as benajah mentions, the pecan is a hickory, Carya illinoisnensis. However, not all hickories produce nuts one would eat.

    You know when you are shelling your own pecans, how the nut meat has two ridges that run down the exterior surfaces of the nut-halves? And how these furrows are filled with a reddish-brown dry pulp that if you mistakenly eat some of, is fantastically astringent and bitter. If your hickory is one of the species that go by the common names of bitternut, or pignut hickory, the nuts will taste like this disagreeable pulp from a pecan throughout, ergo their disagreeable names.

    As tennecedar correctly states, ripe hickories, whether pecan or other, will have their husks turn brown and split spontaneously along the four seams (these seams distinguish the hickory nuts from the walnut/butternut group, genus Juglans that have no seams) and reveal the ripe nut. If your nuts of an edible species and are very immature, that is still green throughout, if they are young enough, immature hickory nuts were formerly (colonial times) made into pickles (stacked in spiced brine, with layers separated by a layer of hickory leaves) but that only works if the nuts are so young that they have not developed the trademark hard shells.

    Thanks for reading.

    edibleplantguy
    Last edited by edibleplantguy; 08-29-2011 at 07:58 AM. Reason: Fix last sentence.

  9. #9
    Scout
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    900
    Thanks
    57
    Thanked 358 Times in 198 Posts

    Default

    But at least now you have enough wood to run the smoker for a while...

  10. #10
    Guide
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    1,328
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 157 Times in 100 Posts

    Default

    Shagbark nuts are delicious. Smooth bark ( or pignut ) are really bitter. Which kind of tree do you have?

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •