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Thread: Carpenters Hatchet

  1. #21
    Guide Supporter Hawkcreek's Avatar
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    No, carpenters hatchets are GENERALLY the same head on a shorter handle than a riggers axe, roofing hatchets are usually lighter weight heads (and shaped differently) on shorter handles and drywall hammers are lighter still.

    Riggers axe, Carpenters axe and Roofing Axe examples
    http://www.estwing.com/category.php?category_id=6

    Drywall hammer/hatchet examples
    http://www.estwing.com/category.php?category_id=5
    Last edited by Hawkcreek; 06-25-2012 at 09:28 PM.
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  2. #22
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    hawkcreek is correct.

    supposedly the rigger part of the name came from the guys building wooden oil derricks.
    it seems to be primarily a western usa tool.

    legend has it the guys who became house framers had the blade removed and claws welded on the poll. thus the 22 ounce california (special) framing hammers was born.

    i've seen railroad carpenters using the long handled axe as a fine-adjusting tool.

    i picked up an estwing carpenter's axe decades ago because it was a handsome tool. it's sharp and makes an excellent paring tool. whacks nails with authority as well.

    to be honest i'm more likely to use a hammer and carry a sheathed chisel than drag out the axe.

  3. #23
    Baryonyx Walkeri Vendor FortyTwoBlades's Avatar
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    I find the Rigger's Axe great for when I'm out bracing old fences. I can chop one end of the board I'm using into a point on one end then drive it into the ground at an angle before nailing it in place.
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    I do. It was my grandfather's before he passed away. Given the type of person he was, my guess is that the thing is somehow engineered to never break, be waterproof, and self-sharpening.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flag_Mtn_Hkrs View Post
    My dad was a carpenter and always brought his out camping. He always called it a "rigging axe". I guess he used it for framing out houses and for splitting shingles on roof work. It sure did split the kindlin in camp.
    That's right. When I was just out'a high school in the '70's, everybody used rigging axes to frame with. We used them for adjusting seating notches on rafters when walking the top plates. Actually, the axes were more of a status symbol then because all the old timers used them. I remember the throwing contests during lunch was the best use for mine. LOL

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    I use one quite a bit around the acreage for fixing fences etc also. Very handy as opposed to mushrooming the head of a regular hatchet.

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