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Thread: Natural v. Forced Patina

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    Default Natural v. Forced Patina

    Ok guys, I just recieved my Mora 840mg in the mail and have to say extremely pleased with it. Got it from Ragweed Forge and must say the service was excellent.

    Now being that I am borderline OC'D when it comes to taking care of my gear I am trying to figure out if there is a major difference in forced or natural patina's? Is one better than the other? I've read some of the posts here and watched alot of the youtube stuff and not sure which way to go.

    So can I get ya'lls opinions, and whats best way to do a forced one if I go that route.

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    I prefer a natural patina, gives it an "earned" character. I've made a few knives that I used mustard to make designs or patterns and then soaked it in vinegar or gun bluing,really like the gun bluing. The patina on a high carbon blade is actually just oxidation,which ironically,helps protect it from rust. I usually just keep mine oiled and let it be what it'll be...Jon

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    Mora junkie Rat biker Supporter Easy_rider75's Avatar
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    I tossed around the idea of a forced even tried a test section on the blade eh I'd rather let it age naturally seems better to me
    I'm not one of those complicated, mixed-up cats. I'm not looking for the secret to life.... I just go on from day to day, taking what comes.~Frank Sinatra~
    bushclass 6 of 14

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    Stick it in an apple or a potato for a night or two. It doesn't force as much of a patina as the vinegar or mustard approach. It's more like giving the patina a head start. I heard somewhere that this is what the old timers used to do... can't remember where I heard it though.

    After that I just strop it, oil it, and occasionally take it to the stone.

  5. #5
    econnofoot
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    Personally I believe in natural patina. I do admit to stripping the black off a Condor though but haven't patina d it.

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    I don't think there is anything wrong with a forced patina. In the end they will all look about the same anyways.

    Bushclass USA Intermediate:

    "Do not mess with the forces of Nature, for thou art small and biodegradable!"

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    Bushmaster Bush Class Basic Certified madmax's Avatar
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    I wait, I get rust. I force it immediately. Nobody's knocked the look yet.

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    Dr. Fishguts Bush Class Basic Certified kgd's Avatar
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    Nobody will cite the "look of the patina" as the reason they are calling your mora ugly Its a using knife that works.

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    my moras see allot of use... they all look like hell.. they all can shave with ease. and I haven;t had one disintegrate on account of corrosion.. I say use it let it get it;s own look.. use it allot and strop regularly and the edge will allways shine like new.

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    I go against the flow. If I get a carbon blade that's all shiny, I force a patina, usually just soak it in lemon juice overnight, wipe it off, strop it, oil it and let it wear in from there.

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