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Thread: Best One Burner Camp Stove

  1. #51
    wolfy
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dearborn View Post
    My only small stove remaining is a Coleman 502 with an overhauled generator and pump. I have disposed of a GI Coleman and 3 Optimus 8R, but I will keep the next Optimus or Svea 123 that I get my hands on.
    Hold on to 'em.....the last two nice 8R's I saw auctioned on eBay went for $152.50 and $223.50 I'm saving mine to sell for retirement income

  2. #52
    Tracker dcbowtecher's Avatar
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    Coleman Exponent! So far, flawless operation.

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by fratermus View Post
    Which alcohol are you using that is both nontoxic and relatively cheap? In my reading it seems that:

    methanol (ie, yellow heat) = cheap, toxic
    ethanol = non-toxic, multiuse, expensive
    denatured (ie, methanol added to make it toxic) = cheap, toxic
    iso = cheap and relatively nontoxic, but doesn't burn well straight in stoves (flatcat possibly notwithstanding)

    What am I missing here? If there is a cheap + nontoxic alcohol that works well in trangia burners then I'll stock up on it.

    I am currently running a 2:1 (meth:iso91) mix in my trangia/svea burners.
    Yellow Heet is toxic, but remember it has other chemicals in it besides methanol.
    Denatured alcohol is grain, ethanol, alcohol mixed with a little methanol to make it undrinkable, thus "denatured". It is not toxic to cook with, only if you drink it in some quantity.
    I get denatured alky at the paint section of the big box stores or Ace Hardware. Buy it by the quart or gallon and it's really cheap. I use a turkey baster to get the alky out of the can and put it into the little fuel flasks. I tried to get Everclear, basically pure ethanol, but it's relatively quite expensive. Usually sold in the liquor section of stores.
    Isopropyl alky, rubbing alcohol, is sold in various mixes, as percentages of water. If you get a low water percentage it burns pretty well, but does soot things up.
    My favorite is the cheap denatured alcohol. Sometimes when it's VERY cold out and the alky has a hard time getting started, I add a squirt of Ronson lighter fluid or perhaps a little dash of Coleman white gas to kick things off. Once warmed up, it's fine.

  4. #54
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    Can someone point to a definitive scientific analysis of yellow heet? I've seen arguments on both sides, and can't tell which one is more believable.

    In other news, I found Klean strip now has an eco line of products, particularly denatured alcohol, and at home depot it is priced the same as the regular line. Both are said to be usable for marine stove so there may be little reason not to choose the green line.

    http://www.wmbarr.com/product.aspx?catid=99&prodid=201

  5. #55
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    I vote for primus multi fuel got mine about 20 years ago and has served me well
    has been all over the world and has burned all kinds of fuel in all altitudes and temps
    you can find them on sale every once and a while picked mine up for 50.00 but that was long ago. they do sell repair parts so you have extras but never have had to use.
    The best thing is when traveling you can bring empty fuel bottle and fill it with what ever you can find no need to hunt for canisters.
    http://store.primuscamping.com/backp...th-windscreen/

    second vote is for any alcohol stove made from cans lots of the on you tube these are great if your boiling water only and are making small meals the cheep way.

    third vote is get boil they are fast have built in cup nice over all package.
    http://www.jetboil.com/
    hope this helps
    Last edited by zippy; 04-09-2012 at 08:05 PM.

  6. #56
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    I have a Century Tool & Manufacturing model that screws on top of a propane cylinder. Sure its heavier than the smaller ones but fuel is cheap & everywhere, plus one cylinder will last me a week in the bush.

  7. #57
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    I have to agree, Coleman stoves have been on more camping trips with me and my family than any other.
    I have a the 502 sportster, a couple of the larger coleman white gas stoves, the feather lite 400 (backpacking) that has been kicking around since the mid 80's, and 2 of the iso/pro canister stove (also for backpacking when I am not taking or can't take an alcohol stove).

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    Quote Originally Posted by EdD270 View Post
    Denatured alcohol is grain, ethanol, alcohol mixed with a little methanol to make it undrinkable, thus "denatured". It is not toxic to cook with, only if you drink it in some quantity.
    Thanks for the thoughtful and complete response.

    The MSDS I have seen for denatured included up to 50% methanol. I agree denatured is a great fuel; I don't think we can let our guard down around it, particularly given the very small amounts of methanol required to be fatal.

    BTW, any problems with picking up water after the denatured has been opened/closed a few times? It's the reason I haven't bought in gallons yet.

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by fratermus View Post
    Thanks for the thoughtful and complete response.

    The MSDS I have seen for denatured included up to 50% methanol. I agree denatured is a great fuel; I don't think we can let our guard down around it, particularly given the very small amounts of methanol required to be fatal.

    BTW, any problems with picking up water after the denatured has been opened/closed a few times? It's the reason I haven't bought in gallons yet.
    I've never had any problems with water absorption with any alky fuel. I keep it closed up tight in the original container, taking out only what I'll use on a trip and that goes into a fuel flask.
    My point is merely that all fuels are toxic. Coleman white gas, gasoline, alcohol in all it's varieties, even wood gives off noxious fumes. While we definitely need to be careful using them, many, like wood and alcohol, are much less toxic than others. In my experience and opinion denatured alcohol is one of the safest.
    Another factor to consider is clean up after a spill. If you spill white gas, Coleman fuel, or gasoline, especially in your tent, it's an awful mess to clean up, and stinks for days. Alcohol is easy to clean up, evaporates quickly, and leaves no greasy spot. Heet, I'm thinking might be more problematic due to other additives, but still not as bad as gas.

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    Default Couldn't stand it, got to have pics

    Just for fun, since this thread is about stoves, here's some of my favorites. They are the Trangia military alcohol burner, with simmer ring from Tatonka;
    a Coleman Peak One Multi-Fuel stove; a Coleman P1 Apex II stove with fuel bottle, and the old reliable Svea 123 cook kit.
    Note the two Coleman stoves share the same burner design with the built in windscreen. The windscreen is the most obvious difference between these burners and the other Coleman burners, but there are internal differences, too, which make these stoves more efficient and use less fuel.
    Attached Images Attached Images

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