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Thread: Bannock recipe

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    Default Bannock recipe

    I have been lurking and occasionally taking part in discussions here for some time. I have never heard of Bannock until I came to this forum, so I started looking into it and found out I have not only been using it for years, but about 30 years or so ago I came up with my own recipe for Bannock. Not just a little bit, but a rather large batch.

    I use this mix just as you would use Bisquick or any other biscuit mix. You can make anything from it including Bannock, Biscuits, Flapjacks, Brownies, Peanut Butter Brownies, Coffee Cake, and the list goes on and on.

    I make it and put it into gallon sized plastic bags. It lies flat in the freezer that way and will keep almost indefinitely. It doesn’t usually last quite that long at my house.

    I always wanted to write a cook book and thought I would call it “Fat Franks Favorite Fix’ns” with that in mind, I called this “Fat Franks Flapjack Mix”. A friend of mine added the word “Fabulous” to it and he died a short time later, so in honor to him (not me) I changed the name to “Fat Franks Fabulous Flapjack Mix”. I’m still working on the cook book.

    Here is my Large and Small Batch recipes:

    Large Batch of Mix,
    You will need the following ingredients:

    5 lbs Unbleached flour
    2 ½ Cups Dry Milk
    ¾ Cup Baking Powder
    1 Tablespoons Salt (optional)
    3 ¾ Cups Butter Flavor shortening

    Small Batch of Mix
    You will need the following ingredients:

    8 Cups Unbleached Flour
    1 Cup Dry Milk
    ¼ Cup plus 1 Tablespoon Baking Powder
    1 Teaspoons Salt (optional)
    1 ½ Cups Butter Flavor Shortening

    Mixing instructions are easy, mix all dry ingredients together and blend well. Cut in the Shortening until the mixture resembles corn meal.

    For Biscuits add about 1/3 cup liquid (water, milk, fruit juice etc.) to every cup of mix, shape it and bake it. Try adding cooked and crumbled bacon, or what ever meat you have available.

    For Flapjacks (pancakes for those who don’t know) add about ½ cup of liquid and a little sugar to each cup of the mix. I love making them with fruit juice and add the same fruit or a complimentary fruit to the mix.

    For Bannock, make the biscuit recipe and put whatever you want into it.

    Hope you enjoy it as much as I have.

    Now I’m hungry, I think I will go eat.


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    So is bannock just a type of bread? If so what makes it diiferent from bread? I never heard of bannock?

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    Yum yum. I have not tried the butter flavor shortning. great idea!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pappy Frank View Post
    I have been lurking and occasionally taking part in discussions here for some time. I have never heard of Bannock until I came to this forum, so I started looking into it and found out I have not only been using it for years, but about 30 years or so ago I came up with my own recipe for Bannock. Not just a little bit, but a rather large batch.

    I use this mix just as you would use Bisquick or any other biscuit mix. You can make anything from it including Bannock, Biscuits, Flapjacks, Brownies, Peanut Butter Brownies, Coffee Cake, and the list goes on and on.

    I make it and put it into gallon sized plastic bags. It lies flat in the freezer that way and will keep almost indefinitely. It doesn’t usually last quite that long at my house.

    I always wanted to write a cook book and thought I would call it “Fat Franks Favorite Fix’ns” with that in mind, I called this “Fat Franks Flapjack Mix”. A friend of mine added the word “Fabulous” to it and he died a short time later, so in honor to him (not me) I changed the name to “Fat Franks Fabulous Flapjack Mix”. I’m still working on the cook book.

    Here is my Large and Small Batch recipes:

    Large Batch of Mix,
    You will need the following ingredients:

    5 lbs Unbleached flour
    2 ½ Cups Dry Milk
    ¾ Cup Baking Powder
    1 Tablespoons Salt (optional)
    3 ¾ Cups Butter Flavor shortening

    Small Batch of Mix
    You will need the following ingredients:

    8 Cups Unbleached Flour
    1 Cup Dry Milk
    ¼ Cup plus 1 Tablespoon Baking Powder
    1 Teaspoons Salt (optional)
    1 ½ Cups Butter Flavor Shortening

    Mixing instructions are easy, mix all dry ingredients together and blend well. Cut in the Shortening until the mixture resembles corn meal.

    For Biscuits add about 1/3 cup liquid (water, milk, fruit juice etc.) to every cup of mix, shape it and bake it. Try adding cooked and crumbled bacon, or what ever meat you have available.

    For Flapjacks (pancakes for those who don’t know) add about ½ cup of liquid and a little sugar to each cup of the mix. I love making them with fruit juice and add the same fruit or a complimentary fruit to the mix.

    For Bannock, make the biscuit recipe and put whatever you want into it.

    Hope you enjoy it as much as I have.

    Now I’m hungry, I think I will go eat.
    I guess great minds must work alike. I call my version The Professor's Log Cabin Baking Mix.

    The proportions are a bit different, but I, too, start with a 5-lb bag of flour.

    I have a recipe booklet that I would be happy to share with you in return for a copy of yours. I love biscuits and biscuit mixes!
    ...and I'll see you soon!
    YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/70TheProfessor?feature=mhee
    Illinois Slumdog #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by kyhunt View Post
    So is bannock just a type of bread? If so what makes it diiferent from bread? I never heard of bannock?
    My dictionary says that bannock is "a kind of oatmeal or barley cake baked on a griddle." In common bushcraft terms, it is any type of camp-baked flatbreads.

    Baking bannock is fun, and is one of the skills of the Basic Bushclass. IA Woodsman has a nice video lesson on ways to bake it at camp.

    Regular bread gets smashed in a pack. Bannock is a made-on-the-spot bread that you can have fresh anytime. It's often just biscuit mix, but guys here add lots of other tasty ingredients.

    While there may be dozens of variations, woodsmen all seem to agree that bannock is tops; and that making it along the trail, with maybe some bacon or coffee turns a plain hike in the woods into a bushcraft outing!
    ...and I'll see you soon!
    YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/70TheProfessor?feature=mhee
    Illinois Slumdog #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by kyhunt View Post
    So is bannock just a type of bread? If so what makes it diiferent from bread? I never heard of bannock?
    Bannock is a type of biscuit, with additions in the dough. I suggest you look at some other thread about it. I also suggest yo look at the Bushclass Bannock Cooking video. They will both help.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Awasos View Post
    Yum yum. I have not tried the butter flavor shortning. great idea!
    It does add a flavor that is delicious. I do not always use it, but most of the time. Also you can use Lard which gives it a unique flavor also.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheProfessor View Post
    I guess great minds must work alike. I call my version The Professor's Log Cabin Baking Mix.

    The proportions are a bit different, but I, too, start with a 5-lb bag of flour.

    I have a recipe booklet that I would be happy to share with you in return for a copy of yours. I love biscuits and biscuit mixes!
    I will send you a PM in a few minutes. I would love to trade not only you but anyone that has similar.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheProfessor View Post
    My dictionary says that bannock is "a kind of oatmeal or barley cake baked on a griddle." In common bushcraft terms, it is any type of camp-baked flatbreads.

    Baking bannock is fun, and is one of the skills of the Basic Bushclass. IA Woodsman has a nice video lesson on ways to bake it at camp.

    Regular bread gets smashed in a pack. Bannock is a made-on-the-spot bread that you can have fresh anytime. It's often just biscuit mix, but guys here add lots of other tasty ingredients.

    While there may be dozens of variations, woodsmen all seem to agree that bannock is tops; and that making it along the trail, with maybe some bacon or coffee turns a plain hike in the woods into a bushcraft outing!
    Professor, you can add a little oatmeal to the biscuit recipe and that too is delicious. That is not in my booklet of recipes, but I have done it often.

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    did you know bannock is originally from Scotland, the natives never made it before the scot trappers showed up. the original recipe is
    2 cups flour
    2 table spoons baking powder
    1 table spoon lard

    i add seasoning salt to taste

    mix dry ingredients then work in lard

    this is the one i use it will not go bad or rancid.
    then when your out in the bush add what ever you want and water, if cooking on stick dont make to wet or it will fall off.
    cook it on a rock or on a stick or in frying pan

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