Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: Parachute camopy for cover

  1. #1
    Guide Bush Class Basic Certified dwightp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Northwest Georgia
    Posts
    2,687
    Thanks
    966
    Thanked 1,224 Times in 426 Posts

    Default Parachute canopy for cover

    After looking at the photos of the hardwoodsman meet and seeing the big parachute they had that provide some protection from the sun, I am thinking of getting one for myself.

    I thought this would be a good time to discuss this....never seen it as a thread topic before. So, I'm looking to the ranks for tips, photos, etc.

    Some of my questions include:
    where to buy, how much to pay, what size to get, how tall a center pole to use, how many "tie downs" is adequate, tips on tying down, set-up times and tips, etc., etc.

    Thanks in advance.
    Last edited by dwightp; 05-18-2012 at 02:49 PM.

  2. #2
    Scout Wayland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Over the seas and far away,
    Posts
    385
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 195 Times in 89 Posts

    Default

    I've posted this before but this is how I go about it:

    There are occasions when it is useful to protect a larger space from the worst of the weather. A surplus parachute canopy can be effectively used to make a practical and economical shelter for a workspace or camp fire area and I thought I would show you how I set mine up for the first time recently.

    When you obtain them through usual sources, such canopies have often been rendered unserviceable by cutting the cords or in some cases the material itself.



    Depending on the condition such cuts are usually quickly and easily repaired with a sewing machine which leaves you with a large amount of useful material for making a weather resistant shelter.

    It is important to realise that the nylon material is not waterproof but it will tend to channel the water down the material to the lowest point which is usually round the edge. In heavy rain a certain amount will be forced through the canopy in the form of a fine spray but this does at least reduce torrential rain to a mere drizzle.

    On other occasions the same shelter may provide a shady area in the heat of a summer day without blocking the light and making it difficult to work under.



    I obtained a large “Irvin” canopy that I think came from a pilots emergency ejection seat from a surplus supplier in the UK. When it arrived there was a heavy net attached to the circumference which I quickly removed with a pair of sharp scissors.

    The next thing I removed was the drag chute and some internal lines, connecting the outer edge to the fifth radial seam, which were designed to scallop the canopy when deployed. For my purposes they just prevented the chute from hanging properly so I cut them about six inches from the seams. I used the attached residue of these lines to make simple loops that can now be used to spread the material when the shelter is set up. The remaining spare cord was useful for setting up and I'm sure I'll find a use for the other bits too.



    To set up the shelter I used two sturdy trees either side of our intended space and a good length of strong cord. I used a catapult with a heavy hex nut to launch a thin crab line over suitable branches and then drew the heavier cord over and across the space between the trees. The cords across the air vent in the centre of the canopy were then attached to this line with a strong karabiner and hoisted up.



    To spread the material over your working space you can of course just tie it directly to suitable trees or bushes but a much better way was suggested by Steve (Mesquite on BcUK). His idea was to make a perimeter line around the outside with another strong line and then attach the edges of the chute to this with lighter cord or even “bungees”. That's what I did here and it worked very well, allowing the cords to be anchored exactly where needed instead of pulling at odd angles.

    In use you will find that the outer edge drips as rainwater soaks though and anything attached to the inside of the chute will make a drip point too but as these are in a fixed position they are easily avoided. The loops left on the fifth radial seam were prone to this but I am reluctant to remove them at this stage because I think they will be useful to set it up in smaller areas on other occasions.

    We were working from this fixed location for just under a week which included heavy rain and hot sunshine. In both cases we found the shelter it provided very useful indeed. We did not experience much wind so cannot comment on that but my gut feeling is that it was certainly adequately secured this way to deal with normal breezy conditions, I would have to evaluate strong wind as it occurred.

  3. #3
    Guide Bush Class Intermediate Certified Davros's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Lakeville Indiana
    Posts
    1,059
    Thanks
    2,013
    Thanked 2,642 Times in 481 Posts

    Default

    Awesome setup Wayland. In the first picture it looks dome shaped. In the second it looks more conical. Is that from the campfire? Hot air filling the canopy?

  4. #4
    Scout Wayland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Over the seas and far away,
    Posts
    385
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 195 Times in 89 Posts

    Default

    It was a gentle breeze that kept filling and spilling that day.

    At night it looked like a giant luminous jellyfish trying to swim to the surface.

  5. #5
    Guide Supporter
    Bush Class Basic Certified
    Vendor
    Infidel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Taylor Ridge, Illinois
    Posts
    2,749
    Thanks
    2,639
    Thanked 6,363 Times in 1,011 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dwightp View Post
    After looking at the photos of the hardwoodsman meet and seeing the big parachute they had that provide some protection from the sun, I am thinking of getting one for myself.

    I thought this would be a good time to discuss this....never seen it as a thread topic before. So, I'm looking to the ranks for tips, photos, etc.

    Some of my questions include:
    where to buy, how much to pay, what size to get, how tall a center pole to use, how many "tie downs" is adequate, tips on tying down, set-up times and tips, etc., etc.

    Thanks in advance.
    Good topic. Ive been considering the same thing.


    The Proud Father of a Proud Soldier...GO ARMY !
    You call me an infidel like it's a bad thing.

  6. #6
    Guide Bush Class Basic Certified dwightp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Northwest Georgia
    Posts
    2,687
    Thanks
    966
    Thanked 1,224 Times in 426 Posts

    Default

    Actually, I never thought about having a campfire under it.......thanks.

  7. #7
    Tracker
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Uwharrie National Forest-North Carolina
    Posts
    100
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts

    Default

    I made a call to a nearby surplus store this afternoon to see if they had any chutes. They said they had more than 20. Green is cheapest, white is more. They average around 60 bucks starting out for a decent one.
    This might be a good idea for our campsite at scout camp this summer.

  8. #8
    Scout Wayland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Over the seas and far away,
    Posts
    385
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 195 Times in 89 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dwightp View Post
    Actually, I never thought about having a campfire under it.......thanks.
    Actually they get a bit more waterproof as they smoke up.

    I guess it's the tar or something.

  9. #9
    Tracker jaybird14's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Land of beer and cheese
    Posts
    149
    Thanks
    174
    Thanked 107 Times in 56 Posts

    Default

    Back in the stone ages,1970's, my scout troop used those for winter camping.
    we piled lots of straw inside, no fire, and froze to death.

    great times!!!
    JJ

  10. #10
    Tracker fratermus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    75081
    Posts
    97
    Thanks
    46
    Thanked 25 Times in 18 Posts

    Default

    Wayland's setup (and write-up) is epic.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •