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Thread: What kind of sharpener do I need?

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    Default What kind of sharpener do I need?

    What kind of sharpener do I need? I just order this little folder today. I see a lot of you guys sharpen new knives when you get them because you're not happy with the edge.





    http://www.boker.de/us/pocket-knife/...1MB550DAM.html

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    That is a hard question. Lots of ways to go. I like diamond "stones" like EZ lap and DMT. Natural stones used with oil are very good the best can be $$ . Then you have the ceramic stones / sticks. Also good as are Japanese water stones. Aluminum Oxide Stones are very common but not my choice. I am not even going to get into all the "systems" and other gadgets you can get.
    I think learning the skill is more important than what you use. You want to keep the angle the same for every stroke and do the same amount on each side. coating the edge with a marker is a good way to see where the edge is meeting the stone.
    Convexing is also a good option. I will let others cover that. What ever you do please stay away from Tungsten Carbide sharpeners as they scrap away to much material The same for most power grinders. Both of witch will never give you the skill.
    By the way that is a nice looking knife. Good luck hope I helped a little.

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    That question cannot be answered easily. It depends on personal experience and how much money you are willing to spend. If you have never sharpened a knife you should try to get with someone and try different methods. I think it is easier for most beginners to use either a "Lansky Type" set of stones with the clamp and different stones. Another good beginner method is one of the kits which have diamond and ceramic rods which fit in a base that holds the rods in a "V" shape.

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    Fine sand paper or the fine grit hardware cloth , used on a wooden backer, will give you a very good edge, if you can hold a constant angle.

    The diamond stones are very fast and effective, but prices run from the 20 dollar range on up, and the number of brands and choices can be confusing.

    I have used an old coffee cup, a steel , and a strip of belt leather as a sharpening kit when up at the farm. Worked well, too.
    Nemo me impune lacessit ! Wisdom is knowing what to do; Skill is knowing how to do it ; Character is what lets you actually do the job.
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    Top of a half open car window works . Heck a finger nail file would as was said above it's more about how then what. I think Murray Carter has some good videos http://www.cartercutlery.com/japanes...ctional-videos Some nice knives I can't afford also. Sign up for the knife care tips.

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    That depends on your skill level, can you keep and angle between the stone and knife. If not you need to practise a lot. I love my diamond hones, if you have a Walmart see if they carry the Smith's diamond hones, you can get one with a handle that has two sides for $15.00. Its gray and black and comes apart, you turn the stone around an insert it into the handle. One side is course and one side is fine. I've gotten lazy in my old age and started carrying a small yellow plastic Smith sharpener. It has limited use however, but the angles are pre set. It has ceramic rods and carbide cutters. As has already been said, be careful with anything that has carbide cutters. I have used carbide cutters before to re-set the angle and straighten an edge that was trashed pretty bad, but they take a lot of metal off of the knife fast. I was at my local Gander Mountain the other day and found that Gerber makes something similar to the Smiths, but uses course and fine diamond rods instead of ceramic and carbide, so I bought the last 2 they had and will be looking for more of them. They were only $5.00 each. They will be replacing the Smith's in my packs. They also have wide enough slot to fit my thicker bigger knives. Depending on your skill level you might want to learn with some kind of flat stone then move onto something faster and easy later after you develop the skill.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lg&m View Post
    That is a hard question. Lots of ways to go. I like diamond "stones" like EZ lap and DMT. Natural stones used with oil are very good the best can be $$ . Then you have the ceramic stones / sticks. Also good as are Japanese water stones. Aluminum Oxide Stones are very common but not my choice. I am not even going to get into all the "systems" and other gadgets you can get.
    I think learning the skill is more important than what you use. You want to keep the angle the same for every stroke and do the same amount on each side. coating the edge with a marker is a good way to see where the edge is meeting the stone.

    I really like the falkniven stones, and lg&m's advice is good, thats how i learned to sharpen a knife, using the black magic marker method to help keep my angle right. as a matter of fact I still use that method when reprofiling a grind.

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    Surffisher, check out the Bushclass no. 6, sharpening. The lesson is a great place to start figuring out what you need and how to use it.

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    As was already alluded to it is easier to tell you what not to do. In my earlier years I destroyed more than a couple knifes with "easy to use" gadgets. Avoid the all the electric grinders and gadgets that "help" you set your angles. Most especially stay away from the following carbide scrapers like this one;



    With a knife like the one you linked I would recommend either the sandpaper method listed in the bushclass or a set of Japanese wet stones even an inexpensive diamond set will work good. Just go slow and use a fine grit. This knife shouldn't require re-profiling out of the box so just go slow with the amount of material you remove. It can be intimidating but you'll get a feel for doing it by hand with practice.
    Last edited by Lerch; 08-05-2012 at 10:19 AM.
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    I love my Spyderco Sharpmaker ! and sand paper works good to !

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