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Thread: Emergency Blanket With Tent

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    Default Emergency Blanket With Tent

    I still aint all up for sleeping without a tent unless I know there is no crawlies or bigger animals that could harm me around. Insects, spiders and stuff aint the problem now but still thinking of coyotes, bears, wild bores or some other animal sniffing me while I'm sleeping don't appeal to me.
    I know, how is a tent gonna keep something out if it won't to get in.

    Anyway, going on at least 10 or 30ish mile hike (depends how I feel after crossing Blood Mnt.) on the AT in N.GA next month and may carry my Eureka Solitaire tent and to help cope with the cold I thought about putting my SOL Survival Blanket between netting and rain fly to help keep in the warmth. I was gonna try to position it where I could still get ventilation to reduce condensation.

    Would this idea work?

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    Scout MarcoMontana's Avatar
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    Try a Hammock Tent that's Bushcrafty.... lol


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    I'd think that you would be better off with the survival blanket closer down on top of you, perhaps under your pad and then wraped over you and your bag if there is enough blanket there to do it with. If the ground is cold what can you do to improve your thermal layer underneath you? You've got the tent to trap air and some warmth, and of course your sleeping bag. I rely on my bag for warmth and the tent or tarp to keep the weather elements off me and my gear....Have fun on your trip...

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    My solitaire is a pretty "warm" tent. There isn't a whole lot of space left over after I crawl in there. I think it would be worth a shot. Being someone who moves around alot when sleeping, the idea appeals to me.
    That being said, I have only used my solitaire to ~30*f. What could it hurt to give it a try?

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    Tents need to be ventilated to keep the moisture moving out of the tent. If you are blocking the vents then the moisture from your breath will condense on the inside of the tent which could cause problems if it is heavy enough. Stay warm by dressing properly and using an appropriate sleep system. Insulation from the ground is critical in cold weather so an insulated sleeping pad is needed or several layers of insulating material can be used (fleece blankets, etc).

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    After looking at a photo of the Solitaire I can see where you're coming from...it's a 3-season with lots of mesh in the body. I use a first gen Sierra Designs Clip Flashlight with nothing but mesh on both ends. I've been snowed on in that tent a couple times and had icy wind shoot right under the fly and pass through. I'm with mjh above...I'd keep the emergency blanket close and forget about trying to keep the whole tent warm.
    Dave

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    With a reflective blanket you would be better pinning it up on one side inside. This can provide a small amount of actual insulation by trapping air between the tent wall and the blanket as well as reflecting heat (from you and perhaps a candle lantern) and light. It's surprising how much heat a candle lantern will provide in a small tent.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dducey View Post
    Tents need to be ventilated to keep the moisture moving out of the tent. If you are blocking the vents then the moisture from your breath will condense on the inside of the tent which could cause problems if it is heavy enough. Stay warm by dressing properly and using an appropriate sleep system. Insulation from the ground is critical in cold weather so an insulated sleeping pad is needed or several layers of insulating material can be used (fleece blankets, etc).
    Well, dducey made every point I was thinking of making, Matrix. I can only echo it and amplify it by adding: Never block your tent's ability to vent moisture (nor your sleeping bag) in cold weather. Nothing will make you feel clammier, colder, and reduce the insulating efficacy of your bag and shelter, than trapped moisture.

    Hope this helps,
    -Martin

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    Consider a chemical hot-pack like hand or foot warmers but for your lower back. They sell them at any drugstore, same type of material but much larger and with a Velcro belly-belt. Actually heats your blood as it passes through your kidneys. They work. Get one per night, about 6 oz each (I'm guessing).

    Lots of alternate ways to improve heat -- hot water bottles (zero weight), good hat & socks, proper sleepwear, candle lantern inside tent, etc.

    Frankly I usually stay warmer in a tarp with a fire, but I don't mind having critters sniffing my eyeballs while I sleep.

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    Guide Bush Class Intermediate Certified Davros's Avatar
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    I put an E blanket over my tent but under the rain fly and it made a noticeable difference. My tent is an REI quarter dome T3 plus and is mostly no-seeum netting so i had ventilation. The only heat source was battery operated christmas lights. I used a 35 degree bag and insulated air pad. The temp got down to 2 degrees. I was fine as long as I stayed in the bag. I think a UCO lantern would have made a huge difference.



    More pics from that night. http://s596.photobucket.com/albums/t...gs/Outing%201/

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