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Thread: Bannock

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    Quote Originally Posted by anubis1335 View Post
    If you put the dry mix in a ziplock you can just add water to the mix in the bag, cut a corner off the zipolock bag and pipe it into your skillet.

    What i use is

    1 cup ap flour
    1 tsp baking powder
    1 tsp salt
    Add enough water to make a thick pancake like batter in the bag..mix by squishing it all aroundin the ziplock baggie(no mess!) then pipe it into our skillet. Takes all the mess outta the process
    very good idea, im new to the bannock as well and never tried it. Hope to give it a try this winter at home before I attempt it in the field.

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    In the past year, I copied a bannock recipe from this forum - 2 cups flour, 1/3 cup powdered milk, 3 teaspoon sugar, 2 teaspoon baking powder and 1 teaspoon salt - and have made bannock on several occasions. Earlier today, I got the wild idea of mixing in some chopped pepperoni, chopped cheese, chopped jalapeno peppers and some sliced green olives. I was very pleased with the result and want to do it again with a small Dutch oven.

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    If you placed the bannock in a canvas bag, wouldn't you then have to wash the bag before re-using it? Also, does anyone use butter in theirs?

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    Sourdough Blackberry Bannock by Schwert




    Bannock in its simplest form is a great trail bread that consists of flour, water, salt and some leavening agent. Leavening can be achieved with either baking powder, soda or sourdough yeast starter. This pictorial recipe uses a sourdough yeast starter and blackberries to make a semi-sweet bannock. The basic sourdough sponge can be used for many breadstuffs with just minor variations in the process.

    Infinite sourdough variations can be used to produce bannock and many other excellent types of bread. This semi-sweet dough with berries makes for a great trail lunch with cheese.

    Sourdough starter, this one is about 12 years old and this is what it looks like after a week of non-use. Not terribly attractive but nice and sour with a hint of alcohol aroma. This starter was made long ago with water, flour and a cake of bread yeast. I keep a small jar in the refrigerator as an emergency backup in case this main working batch somehow goes bad. But I have never had to restore this one.

    Sourdough Starter, dormant I mixed up the starter, and removed about a cup of the starter to a separate bowl. I added about a half cup of water and less than a cup of flour to the starter to replace the bit used. I keep this like a thin pancake batter in consistency.

    Refresh Starter I add honey (2+ tablespoons or so) and some flour to the starter, mix, cover and let rest for a while. This is still batter-like but much thicker than the starter. Sometimes I allow this sponge to work overnight other times an hour or so. This step is useful if the starter has not been used for a long time. This allows the poor dormant yeast spores to realize they have just entered the good life....of course, if they knew the oven was coming....well the celebration would probably be a bit less intense...

    Add Honey to Bannock batter
    Add flour to Bannock batter After it is obvious the yeast has woken up (bubbles in the sponge), I added milk or in this case heavy cream (did not have any milk), and stir in more flour and some salt ( half-teaspoon) to make a soft dough. Water works just as well, but milk or cream makes for a richer dough.

    Add cream to sponge To the soft dough, I add about teaspoon of soda, this both neutralized some of the acid in the starter and produces carbon dioxide to assist with the raising. I do this very near the end of mixing and folding to keep the gas formed in the acid-base reaction in the dough as much as possible. I turn this out on a floured board and knead a few turns. Not like making bread, but just enough to distribute the soda evenly and make a flat somewhat sticky cake.

    Add soda to soft dough In this case, I added some frozen blackberries picked last summer.

    Fold in fruit Drop it into a buttered iron pan and allow to rise for as long as you want (I waited about 4 hours, but this all depends on temperature and yeast activity). For me, I need a minimum of 2 hours and have gone as long as 8 on cool days, but too long you run the risk of huge gas bubbles that can fall.

    then bake Bake at 350 degrees until done, (30-40 minutes or so), the bannock will sound hollow when thumped.

    Done, break and eat This can also be baked in a dutch oven with coals on a campfire, or even slowly fried over coals, then the pan propped up to bake the top. Reflector oven baking of bannock is next on my list of things to do. Mostly I bake these in an indoor oven. Outdoor cooking requires a bit of attention to control the heat but the results are generally good and the outside experience flavors the end result, no matter the actual precison of the baking.

    Notes:

    Baking powder can be used instead of soda, and the bannock can be baked without waiting for the yeast to rise, but this makes for a bit less desirable bannock in my opinion.

    The proportions are not at all important, thinner dough will rise higher; a thicker one will make for a denser bannock. Adding honey, sugar etc is not necessary if a more traditional bannock is desired. I generally add at least a small bit of honey to give the yeast some quick simple sugars that they can utilize, but this is not necessary. Soda and sourdough batter will make carbon dioxide without waiting for the yeast to raise the dough, but this usually results in a fairly heavy bannock. Addition of dried fruits of any sort makes for a good trail lunch, especially when combined with a handful of gorp or some cheese. I like using frozen berries as they essentially make jam during the baking process. Butter or other fats can also be added if desired. I generally do not add any but the fats in milk and in this case the cream. Bannock is an often overlooked breadstuff that can be made quickly or, when time allows more slowly, producing a variety of different results.

    Any number of breadstuffs can be made using sourdough starter. It can be used as pancake batter. The soda trick here works very well, making light fluffy pancakes. Starter, an egg or two, some more flour, a bit of sugar or honey, and either milk or water are combined until about the right consistency is achieved, then a bit of soda added to really froth this up. Here is last weekends breakfast

    One last note: Bannock should be broken, not cut. According to tradition, cut bannock is bad luck.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ppine View Post
    If we are going to talk about traditional foods, why not talk about traditonal methods? Carry your bannock in a canvas sack with a draw string. It can be mixed ahead of time, but just make an indentation in the top of the mix. Add water into the bag and mix until it is the right consistency. Nothing to wash. Wrap around a stick, cook and enjoy. People that use ziplock bags, white plastic bags, orange plastic handled knives, etc. need to ask themsleves why they are interested in bushcraft in my opinion. It would help anyone interested in the old ways to attend a full-fledged rendezvous. The kind where a plastic cooler has to be covered up. Make your camp look like it is from 1912 or 1840. Avoid plastic and new materials.

    If your bannock is too salty, don't put so much salt in it next time. Make up your own recipes. I like it with raisins and some nutmeg thrown in.

    That right there indeed is old school to max

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    Tried a few differnt recipes for bannock and all pretty much edible. I tend to add water and get the consistancy I want when Im ready to cook.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ppine View Post
    If we are going to talk about traditional foods, why not talk about traditonal methods? Carry your bannock in a canvas sack with a draw string. It can be mixed ahead of time, but just make an indentation in the top of the mix. Add water into the bag and mix until it is the right consistency. Nothing to wash. Wrap around a stick, cook and enjoy. People that use ziplock bags, white plastic bags, orange plastic handled knives, etc. need to ask themsleves why they are interested in bushcraft in my opinion. It would help anyone interested in the old ways to attend a full-fledged rendezvous. The kind where a plastic cooler has to be covered up. Make your camp look like it is from 1912 or 1840. Avoid plastic and new materials.

    If your bannock is too salty, don't put so much salt in it next time. Make up your own recipes. I like it with raisins and some nutmeg thrown in.
    If you wanted to be truly authentic, your canvas would be made out of hemp instead of cotton. I contend that cotton canvas of then is equivalent to the plastic of now.

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    I see all these recipes for sweet bannock.....I'm not much of a sweets guy so i'm wondering: Can you make bannock zesty with spices and such or does it not work?

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    Default i make bannock with gravy

    Quote Originally Posted by Brainchild Bushkraft View Post
    I see all these recipes for sweet bannock.....I'm not much of a sweets guy so i'm wondering: Can you make bannock zesty with spices and such or does it not work?
    i am female so tend to do all the cooking in camp no matter how miny men there are in camp . and one dish i make is bannock and gravy you leave out the suger
    ans add spices like peppers and other things it can stretch a meal win you have allot of men to feed and only so much pack space i will post all my make a mix stuff on a seperit post for you men if you would like ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shnick View Post
    I do the baggie mix also, its easier for me since I can make as much as I need.
    No more, no less...
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3cb2YqhaB20
    Fast Forward to 8:30 for a good recipe
    Ha Ha! Love the video man, and great tunes!! Excellent job

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