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Thread: REVIEW: Fall Creek Bushcraft Knife

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    Scout Supporter WiskieTango's Avatar
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    Default REVIEW: Fall Creek Bushcraft Knife

    Greetings everyone! This will be my first knife review here on BCUSA. I am no literary master by any means, so please bear with me and enjoy the review.

    INITIAL CONTACT:
    I have been on a search for a knife maker who could do a custom order to my specifications for quite some time now. I have always had a certain design in my head that was pieced together from several other knife designs. After searching the internet for what seemed like forever, I ran across a knife maker and his work on bladeforums, Shannon from Fall Creek Knives. I sent my email stating what I wanted and the sort of design I was looking for, and honestly I was expecting to be turned down because I had the impression I could have been asking for to much. But to my amazement, Shannon promptly replied back and was ready to get to work on the knife.

    DEVELOPMENT STAGE:
    This was the most nerve racking part of the whole process for me. This is the part where all the decisions for the knifes design were to be made, and if I made a bad decision on my part then I would be stuck with a knife I am not happy with. This process took about a month. During this month, Shannon and I corresponded constantly through emails. As soon as I would send an email, I would receive one back in less than 12 hours. He was so polite and understanding with me, and accepted all of my ideas with a go getter attitude. He never once told me he wasn't willing to give something a shot.

    BUILDING STAGE:
    Once we decided on what the knife should look like, he went ahead and ordered the pieces to complete the knife. During this stage, waiting for the handle scales and liners were the most time consuming part. Once Shannon received all of the components for the knife he started right away on building the knife. It was a matter of days before he was done with the knife, needless to say I was amazed! During the entire build process he also kept me updated with pictures, everything from making the blade blank, the heat treat, and the glueing of the scales.

    KNIFE IN HAND:
    Once I received the tracking number in my email, I could not wait for the knife to arrive. It seemed like I was checking out the delivery status a hundred times a day. Once the knife was on my doorstep, I could barely contain myself. I have never opened a package so quickly and fierce in my entire life. The fit and finish of the knife was phenomenal! I could barely wait to take the knife out and start using it. The first thing I did was get together some fire prep for my backyard fire pit. Once I was used to the blade geometry this knife was a dream! It felt perfect in every aspect.

    SPECS:

    Blade- 4" Cutting Edge
    OAL- 8 7/8"
    Steel- O1
    Scales- Black Redwood Burl (Stabilized)
    Liners- Maroon G10

    PICTURES:
    These pictures are not my own. They were provided by Shannon and taken by his wife.












    FINAL THOUGHTS:
    I am throughly pleased with this knife! It contains every aspect that I have ever wanted in a bushcraft knife. I have tried many knives prior to owning this one and each one before it has left me wanting something more. I am extremely pleased in my dealings with Shannon and will not hesitate in doing business with him ever again. He will continue to have my business for all of my future knives!
    AXE MOB

    One Must Swing An Axe To Know The Axe


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    Scout Supporter Hiker Boy's Avatar
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    That is a beautiful knife!

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    of the Maki Clan Supporter clanmaki's Avatar
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    It is a beautiful knife. I was wondering though, the spine looks it doesn't have a 90 degree edge for striking a firesteel. In fact it looks like it has been beveled even. Was that on purpose? if so why?
    There are no "failures", Just learning experiences.

    PSALMS 83:18; ISAIAH 43:10-12

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    Beautiful knife! Now go get some dirt on it

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    Scout Supporter WiskieTango's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by clanmaki View Post
    It is a beautiful knife. I was wondering though, the spine looks it doesn't have a 90 degree edge for striking a firesteel. In fact it looks like it has been beveled even. Was that on purpose? if so why?
    It was something he did to add to the flare of the knife. I dont like striking my firesteel on the spine of my knives, I strictly use my SAK for that purpose. I have not had any knife spine strike better than my SAK. But I have tested to see if the knife can strike a fire steel and it can, closer to the tip of the blade that is.
    AXE MOB

    One Must Swing An Axe To Know The Axe

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    Scout Supporter WiskieTango's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Airth View Post
    Beautiful knife! Now go get some dirt on it
    I have gotten plenty of use out of the knife since receiving it! But I always keep my toys clean
    AXE MOB

    One Must Swing An Axe To Know The Axe

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    Congrats. It looks very nice and functional at the same time. The blade seems broad for a scandi though, makes it difficult to turn in wood for smaller diameter cuts an finer carving. But you could acomplish this at the tip area as well. Just my thougts.

    Cheers.

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    I love the fact he used a bobbin for the lanyard hole -- that is an awesome touch.
    rounding the spine is a good thing, too.
    nice design -- looking forward to a chance to handle it one of these days.

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    That thing looks awesome.

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    Damn, that`s a fine looking tool! I'm with you on the rounded spine. I really hate that all my bushcraft blades are so uncomfortable on the ol' thumb. I could bevel them , sure, but it's easier to whine...

    I always have something to strike the rod with, and in an emergency, the spine near the edge will do the trick. Or, you know what, I could use the edge if it was a real emergency. The reality is, when the chips are down, situation critical, and a fire is critical, it's likely cold and wet. Cold and wet hands have and increased probability to lose a bit of gripping power. Last thing I want to do is try to start a fire while leaking in my tinder. Jus sayin'.
    And, while on that topic, the whole method of using a knife to strike the rod bugs me. Hold the knife still and pull up on the rod? Not for me. I like to make a pile of small chaff on bark or what ever, and hold it all on the ground with the tip of the rod, and slowly push the striker, usually that awl on my SAK farmer, toward the pile. Keeps everything in place, and blasts sparks right where I want 'em. Have done it this way for 20 years, and only found out I was doing it "wrong" a couple years ago. Read it on the internet. Just between you and I and the fence post (I'm whispering here...) I still do it wrong. Fire still get lit.

    The only thing I would really ever need the sharp spine for would be scraping bark etc, for tinder, but that can be done with the edge at 90 degrees, or with the SAK. I usually use the SAK.

    I would really like to see more pics of your outstanding knife in use, in action. Just a stunning knife that stands out from the common bushcrafter. Great acquisition.

    Jim

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