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Thread: Food???

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    Scout steene's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gunner65 View Post
    I really like the Knorr packets. They are usually rice or noodle and I add spam or chicken when cooking. Most of them cook in 7 minutes or less.
    These are quick and tasty. +1

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    Quote Originally Posted by gunner65 View Post
    I really like the Knorr packets. They are usually rice or noodle and I add spam or chicken when cooking. Most of them cook in 7 minutes or less.
    This has become my "go to" meal due to its taste and easy prep.
    Lightweight and easy to add meat to.

    +3

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    A week long trip doing what? Long hike, pickup camping, water source? I dehydrate most of my meals, but when I am close to the truck, which I do a lot of these days, I carry different stuff.

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    +1 on Zatarains with a foil pack of chicken, it's pretty good in a pinch. It's not light, but whenever I go with one group of friends, we always bring a can of corned beef hash. It's more of a tradition than reasonable packing. That stuff is pure sodium/fat.

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    Dehydrate if you want to save money. Eating freeze dried is the same cost of eating at a restaurant every day. You can do less than 5.00/day is you plan a menu.
    I start my dinners menu with a starch base of pasta, or minute rice, or instant potatoes. Then add dehydrated veggies, then a protein - freeze dried meats or cut up hard sausage, or foil/tin of chicken/fish. Add a dehydrated sauce or packaged gravy to round it out. Condiments on the side -usually tabasco.

    Dinner Favorites - shepherds pie, mac and cheese with curry and tuna, rice with knorr hunter sauce and chopped up chorizo/landjaeger sausage.

    Lunches - pita, salami and cheese or nut butter and jam

    Breakfast - instant oatmeal and coffee. Makes for a regular hiker
    Peel It, Boil It, Fry It, or Forget It. British Colonial Officer Rule

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    Quote Originally Posted by PineMartyn View Post
    MNFury,
    The key to lightweight and good, satisfying meals for longer outings is to dehydrate your own meals. It's much easier than people imagine. The commercial freeze-dried meals are sometimes good (sometimes not), tend to be on the small size when it comes to serving sizes, are packed full of air, and they are expensive.

    If you're planning on making camping a regular thing, a food dehydrator is a wise investment. You just make your own foods (like what you'd eat at home) dehydrate it, and rehydrate it when you're at camp. It's easy, it's fast, it's clean, it won't spoil, and it's blessedly light and compact, so you can bring satisfying meals without having to buy a huge pack. My wife and I have made a couple of instructional videos for people who are just getting started out at camping and want to know how to eat better and pack lighter and smaller.




    Here are some examples of the sorts of foods we pack for our outings.
    For day trips: we usually just bring water, instant coffee, pepperette meat sticks, gorp, granola bars, some dehydrated fruits or fruit leather. It's all light, except for the meat sticks and doesn't need cooking. When wild edibles are available, we gather what we feel like eating if we've not eaten already.

    For backpacking and canoe camping trips we bring all of the above plus an assortment of homemade dehydrated meals such as:
    pasta and meat sauces,
    beef chile with lentils,
    beef stroganoff,
    couscous and veggies,
    shepherd's pie,
    jerky,
    chicken fajitas,
    etc.
    We also bring premixed ingredients to bake bannock, bread, cakes, and panzerotti.

    For fresh food we bring steak (for the first night or two) and eggs and partially cooked bacon to prepare the first morning or two.

    I can't eat fish because I'm allergic, but my wife eats what we catch and we fish only for food, not for sport, so one small fish per day is plenty.

    Hope this helps,
    - Martin
    Thank you very much Martyn. This helps immensely, you may have convinced me to drop 100 bucks on a food dehydrator.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sdjsdj View Post
    Lots of good suggestions above. One thing I tend to "underestimate" when expending large amounts of calories is the need for some high fat/protein content. For me, even though it's heavy, I have a small jar of peanut butter as well as things like cashews/almonds/M & M's with peanuts, Cliff bars Again this does not really help your "getting down the pack weight", but don't go so "slim" that you are constantly hungry because you are not getting enough fat/protein. Also, I know it is somewhat "controversial", but I find many freeze dried/box foods to be way to high in sodium content when consumed as "whole meals" while in the woods.
    Personally I find that dehydrating my own meals is the most satisfying.
    Chili, spaghetti, black beans are all favorites.
    If I want to avoid the hassle of making bannock, I take soft shelled tortillas.

    Also, if you are changing your diet by adding a high amount of things like beans and whole grains and dried fruit, be aware that your digestional system can start to "not cooperate". I may be weird, but a couple of weeks before going on a trip, I will take 3 days and eat the same menu as my trip menu (including cooking it all on my camp stove in the kitchen) to see how I feel, and how tasty it is and how my digestive system works. Believe me it is a great learning experience.
    sound advice i know what you mean by not cooperating. My buddy was not prepared for the shift in food on my last trip. We will simply put as, he dug a lot of holes and did a lot of "paper work"

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    I dehydrate my own meals. The sodium in the freeze dried food was just way to excessive for me. Freezer Bag Cooking has tons of good recipes and I rehydrate my meals in one of Sara's cozies.

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    Lots of good input on this thread. FYI, I have had this dehydrator for 2 years now and it works well. It has gone up in price, but for my use it has worked well. It has a variable temp control and comes with 5 trays and 2 different types of "fine food liners".
    http://www.amazon.com/Nesco-FD-75PR-.../dp/B000FFVJ3C
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    Quote Originally Posted by PineMartyn View Post
    MNFury,
    The key to lightweight and good, satisfying meals for longer outings is to dehydrate your own meals. It's much easier than people imagine. The commercial freeze-dried meals are sometimes good (sometimes not), tend to be on the small size when it comes to serving sizes, are packed full of air, and they are expensive.

    If you're planning on making camping a regular thing, a food dehydrator is a wise investment. You just make your own foods (like what you'd eat at home) dehydrate it, and rehydrate it when you're at camp. It's easy, it's fast, it's clean, it won't spoil, and it's blessedly light and compact, so you can bring satisfying meals without having to buy a huge pack. My wife and I have made a couple of instructional videos for people who are just getting started out at camping and want to know how to eat better and pack lighter and smaller.

    - Martin
    Great videos. Solid advice backed by experience.
    Thanks.
    another winter is starting and I still like... wood, wool, canvas, leather ...
    Bushclass Interm Lessons Completed(Req.=1/11, Elect.=3/12 Outings=0/10)

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