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Thread: DIY Mosin Nagant Bent Bolt Tutorial

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    Default DIY Mosin Nagant Bent Bolt Tutorial

    This will be tutorial for a DIY bent bolt handle for a mosin nagant rifle. It should also work for pretty much any other rifle of similar design. The cost of a bent bolt service ranges anywhere from a $30 epoxy job to a $60 weld and polish. This job will cost you a grand total of $0.62 providing you already have the tools required. The job consists of cuting off the old bolt handle and creating a new handle from a 5/16" bolt. It is then soldered into the bolt body with ordinary solder. Silver solder is prefered as it is stronger and welding it in is best. I could not find silver solder locally and I dont have access to a welder so I used ordinary solder. It seems plenty strong enough for the job. I have done several with no problems. I tried breaking one with no luck. The only reason that it might break if the job is done properly is if it is beat with a hammer repeatedly. It should last the life of the rifle. Anyways lets get started


    TOOLS REQUIRED
    1. Hacksaw
    2. Drill press and a 5/16" bit for metal (hand drill can be used if your careful)
    3. Vise
    4. An assortment of files
    5. A pair of vise grips or a small pipe with an inside diameter of 5/16" or slightly larger
    6. Propane torch
    7. Bench Grinder (not required but it helps)

    MATERIALS REQUIRED
    1. 5/16" grade 8 bolt about 6" long with a smooth shank.
    2. Solder
    3. Fresh tank of propane
    4. Sandpaper

    ESTIMATED TIME
    2-3 hours




    Step 1. Remove bolt from rifle and disassemble it. Set all parts aside except for the handle itself.



    Step 2. Mount bolt handle in vise and use your hacksaw to cut the handle from the body. I used a scrap block of wood to brace the bolt to make for easier cutting. Then cut the ball from whats left of the handle using the same process.






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    Step 3. Using files and a bench grinder if you have one, work away the excess metal where the handle used to be until it is flat. Then use sandpaper to get it nice and smooth. If you plan on a polished finish then now is the time to do most of your sanding work as it is hard to sand around the bolt handle when it is finished.



    Step 4. Insert into rifle and mark the location of where you want the handle to be located.



    Step 5. Mount bolt into vise on your drill press and make sure that its nice and straight on both axisís. I just eye ball it. You just donít want to drill thru the side of it or cause alignment problems. Then using a 5/16Ē bit make a hole roughly 7/16Ē deep. Just make sure not to go all the way thru. Using the same process, drill a hole in the ball.






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    Step 6. This step involves heating metal to very high temperatureís, please use gloves and wear safety glasses and use common sense so you do not get burnt. Mount the 5/16Ē bolt into a vise like pictured with the head down. Using your torch, heat the bolt to a dull red color. Try to keep the heat in as small of an area as possible. This makes helps make a short tight bend as opposed to a long bend point if that makes sense. When the bolt is the correct temperature, slide your pipe over the threads or clamp vise grips over the end. Bend the bolt toward you and make a bend that is roughly 80-85 degrees. Work quickly but donít rush yourself. That will cause an accident. It should bend pretty easy if not you need more heat. Let cool.





    Step 7. When the bolt is cool remove it from the vise and cut it like pictured. The position of the cut will determine how far out the of body the handle will sit. Then cut the threads off. Leave it a little longer than you expect you will need as you can always remove material but you cannot replace it.





    Step 8. (Optional) If you would like for your bolt to have an outward swoop then you repeat step 7 with the side the threads were on down in the vise and the spot you cut facing away from you. You will need to have an idea of how long you want the handle to be and determine where you want the bend. To do this you can do a mock up by placing the new handle into the previously drilled bolt body. When you know where you want the bend, heat that spot up and then use you vise grips or pipe to bend it towards you to the degree in which you want.

    Last edited by Derek2002; 01-08-2013 at 09:36 PM.

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    Step 9. Cut the bolt to the desired length. And you will end up with this. Sorry the pic is upside down but you get the idea.



    Step 10.(Optional) If you need a lower profile handle for your rifle, now is the time to do that. Using a bench grinder and files, flatten the bent portion to your needs like so. This isnít the finished product but after a few minutes on the grinder. Youíll see its nice and even later.



    Step 11. Time for more heat. In this step we will begin soldering the ball to the handle. Clean both of the end of the bolt and the hole in the ball well with sandpaper to ensure a good contact of the solder. Mount the ball in a vise and insert the bolt handle into the hole. Begin heating up the joint for a few minutes. It needs to be about 500 degrees for the solder to melt. The object is that the heat of the metal itself will melt the solder not the flame. Remove heat from the bolt and press your solder into the joint and work your way around it. If it immediately pools upon top of the joint then it is not hot enough and needs heated more. It should flow downward into the joint. When the joint is full it will start pooling on top because there is nowhere else for it to go. When it is cool use your files and sandpaper to remove any excess solder and make the joint look good.






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    Step 12. Using the same process as step 11, you will now solder the handle to the bolt body. You will need to do a mock up to determine the correct angel that you want and mark it some way. Mount the bolt body in a vise and solder the joint.







    Step 13. You can now finish it as you see fit. I kinda like them with a blued finish but many people do a full polish or a dull satin. Here is the finished product on this one. My friend wanted sort of a rough finish on it to go along with the theme of his rifle.





    Well that is pretty much all there is to it. I done this one for a friend at no charge for the sake of this tutorial. It took about 1.5 hrs of labor and about 2 hrs to type up lol. If it helps just one person then it was worth it. I hope that this will save someone some money and help some people out. Im sure I probably left some things out so if there are questions what so ever just ask. Thanks guys.

    UPDATE: While they seemed to be strong enough with regular solder the bolt in this tutorial did break loose. While it might have just been an issue with the solder penetrating into the bolt body and not making a tight bond, I would recommend using silver solder as it is much stronger. It also would not hurt to pin the handle to the body as well just to be sure.
    Last edited by Derek2002; 04-27-2013 at 09:07 AM.


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    well done ...

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    Great tutorial, man. I'm not much of a gunsmith but this was interesting even too me. Thanks.
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    TYhanx Buddy great tutorial
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    This is my favorite one that I done. It was on a project rifle that I was working on but I ended up trading it before it was finished.






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    Thanks, man, That was a great step by step, tutorial........They are a lot of work to do, and yeah, the typing and picture loading takes longer than the job it self, usually.

    Nice work........

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