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Thread: Year long expedition?

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    Default Long Term Camping

    You should by all means follow your dream, but I would recommend living on the edge of wilderness and easing back and forth as circumstance dictates until you acquire some skills you never thought of. I've known of a few people who conducted their life in that manner and they generally did pretty good by being flexible.

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    I kept tellin my gf, theres sasquatch here in maine.... she didnt believe me, now i have proof... anywho good luck on your adventure. ya know, there are in between spots you could go... further than maine but not quite as brutal as alaska... how bout trying someplace in northern canada... might be a good happy medium

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    If you take some rope and plenty of blankets you can make a bed. I have them made in historical sites, you would use the rope for the mattress tie them around or through drilled holes in logs use a tongue and mortise to put the main frame together put the blankets over the rope, the thicker the better.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Das_Sheep View Post
    In eastern Kentucky and West Virginia there is a lot of wild land left. The Danial Boone national forest has some very wild places, some very long trails and some of the most beautiful land you well ever lay your eyes on. You can walk for days and never see a road or another person.

    If you want to camp in one location, that's an option. You can get a hunting license.

    I would suggest against a 365 year camp though if only because winter camping, while fun for a short time, is mostly going to be two guys sitting around playing cards and wishing they had something green to eat for like, a long time. Even though it does not get bad snow, the greens are gone and there is only so much to do.

    There are a couple of really long trails that are way out in the boonies there, some a few hundred miles long. At a pace of maybe 6 or seven easy miles a day you could have trips that are months long. Because you can reach towns along the way, you do not have to carry a years supply of salt, coffee and multivitamins, socks and underwear which you might want to have otherwise.

    Another suggestion would be to take a camcorder with you along with extra memory and a way to charge it. Do little sessions with your friend and you where you talk about what you have learned, and maybe reviews. What gear did you use, what gear did you not use, which gear do you wish you had.

    Along with that camcorder, an ipad or other tablet PC that you can charge so you can keep up with the weather is important. Weather can change very rapidly, and you do not want to learn about a thunder storm moving in and dumping 15 inches of rain at 3am when you are camped by a creek and it was nice out the day before. Also that ipad will let you post video's and update your buddies here on bushcraft USA with your progress. If your savvy you can even make a little map of your progress and upload pictures and video's from different trails.


    I advise against just camping in one spot. I think that would get very boring very quickly. Sure building a shelter and hunting and gathering would be neat at first, but it gets old eventually.

    Another really fun long trip idea is moving by canoe. You can carry a heck of a lot more stuff and your feet will not bleed as much. Limits your options of parks to do it in.


    Last comment: Lyme disease. If you camp in the lower 48 familiarize yourself with the symptoms, and check yourself and your friend for tick's daily. If you get them off early you usually will not get the disease. Every morning when you get up and every evening when you go to bed is a good idea. Taking a bottle of Antibiotics with you for treating that, and various water borne fun is probably a good idea. You can also wear blousing straps on your pants around your boot tops to make your pants look awesome and bloused and prevent ticks from easily climbing up into your pants.

    Edit: For financing, talk to discovery channel or the like about it and maybe they will give you like $5k in return for footage of the journey. Another option is something like gofundme or kick starter. Take a few pictures of you and your friend doing bushcrafty things, then write some sort of tear jerking summery about wanting this once in a life time chance to do this with a friend, and ask random strangers to finance your escapades.
    I have already had Lymes and Bartenella (at the same time, which taught me why antibiotics are amazing) I know exactly what you are talking about. The colder it is the fewer ticks. And I HATE TICKS! I also wear gators when out and about an do tick checks at every stop (call me paranoid). Basically I want to go create a base camp and do adventures all over.

    Canoeing would be fun, but not for a year. Should I build a cabin, and live out of their I can canoe and hunt and fish, but have a real bed to go back to and should the weather go bad I don't have to sit in a wee little tent. The gofundme and kickstarter are genius as is the discovery channel. Perhaps I can do this for free (for me).
    Quote Originally Posted by MohaveGreen View Post
    Or just yo-yo one of the three long-distance trails (AT, PCT, CDT). You could easily turn that into a year-long pursuit, and it would give you something to be doing other than just holing up. I understand that the CDT is still substantially more "wild" than the others. It's also longer, and you could still get your grizzlies on the north end like you would in AK.
    Eww hiking! I like a day hike, but I have a bum leg and can only maintain a few miles (10 or so) for 4 or 5 days. Canoeing is easier, but Id really like to live in a cabin.
    Quote Originally Posted by Dearborn View Post
    You should by all means follow your dream, but I would recommend living on the edge of wilderness and easing back and forth as circumstance dictates until you acquire some skills you never thought of. I've known of a few people who conducted their life in that manner and they generally did pretty good by being flexible.
    I already try to! The house is heated entirely by wood, I have been learning to trap and track. I have done a wool blanket overnight in 20 degree weather (froze my face to a blanket). Its good to be too flexible, but I have a dream and I am damned well achieving it, hell or high-water, cold or no cold, black bears or brown.
    Quote Originally Posted by dragon383 View Post
    I kept tellin my gf, theres sasquatch here in maine.... she didnt believe me, now i have proof... anywho good luck on your adventure. ya know, there are in between spots you could go... further than maine but not quite as brutal as alaska... how bout trying someplace in northern canada... might be a good happy medium
    Lol yeah, upstate Maine is plenty harsh, but not wild. I really want to have no light pollution and feel like Lewis and Clarke (sans hurting the native population).
    Quote Originally Posted by Two Bears View Post
    If you take some rope and plenty of blankets you can make a bed. I have them made in historical sites, you would use the rope for the mattress tie them around or through drilled holes in logs use a tongue and mortise to put the main frame together put the blankets over the rope, the thicker the better.
    That actually sounds like a great idea. It would be easier than a bed and take up less space, though it wouldn't be great seating.

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    I would not go for a year for your first long term. Go for a month to 6 weeks for proof of concept. You will learn what you need, and what you don't. You will learn what you know, and what you need to learn.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aegis View Post
    I would not go for a year for your first long term. Go for a month to 6 weeks for proof of concept. You will learn what you need, and what you don't. You will learn what you know, and what you need to learn.
    I have a 2 week trip planned for the spring in upstate Maine so I am trying to work my way up. I have already don't a month long trip a few years back, but that wasn't self planned.

    EDIT: I just want to say that this year expedition is a fact, the location and when is the only part that will change.
    Last edited by sasquatch; 01-10-2013 at 12:28 AM.

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    You can't just homestead in Alaska anymore. And most land here is state, federal or native owned.

    http://www.blm.gov/ak/st/en/prog/cul...g_Q_and_A.html

    Your plan the way your describing it would cost you and your buddies thousnd's of dollars. It is nice to have dream's but sometimes you have to be realistic. McCandless had dream's of living off the land and we all know the tragic end for that story. As have many other's who have tried that. Some live other's don't.

    If you want to try it, start looking at purchasing a parcel of land from someone or the state. Then try it. So if you don't succeed you can sell the land and have some money to pay off your debt's or some profit.
    Last edited by foxfire; 01-10-2013 at 04:57 AM.
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    As cool as it sounds. With as much as you plan on taking 2 military 5tons i personally think this is not bushcraft. Buy some land, build a cabin and just move in. It sounds like your just moving. With that much food and gear wont take alot of skills past building the cabin.

    Just sounds more survival hero related with 10 tons of gear.

    It does sound fun. On tv the alaska troopers kicked some old man out his shack he had lived in with 9tons less gear for 14 years because he was not the land owner. So yes it can be done. Good luck!

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    Default Log Building

    Check out Ron Brodigan's Great Lakes School of Log Building before you head out. Also you may want to contact Fred Rungee at Salana, Ak. He is in his late eighties and lives in one of the many cabins that he has built over the years. It is a four mile hike to his latest cabin so he had to backpack everything in . He was a Smokejumper, BLM Fire Management Officer, survived a grizzly bear attack, and is an Alaska legend.

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    Quote Originally Posted by foxfire View Post
    You can't just homestead in Alaska anymore. And most land here is state, federal or native owned.

    http://www.blm.gov/ak/st/en/prog/cul...g_Q_and_A.html

    Your plan the way your describing it would cost you and your buddies thousnd's of dollars. It is nice to have dream's but sometimes you have to be realistic. McCandless had dream's of living off the land and we all know the tragic end for that story. As have many other's who have tried that. Some live other's don't.

    If you want to try it, start looking at purchasing a parcel of land from someone or the state. Then try it. So if you don't succeed you can sell the land and have some money to pay off your debt's or some profit.
    I was planning on purchasing land and then selling said land (or keeping it depending on how my finances are). hat was actually my first step, and I think I can get enough land for about $5000 or less. With the BLMs budget issues (they sound like they are going broke) I doubt they would be too adverse to selling a few acres.
    Quote Originally Posted by captainamer View Post
    As cool as it sounds. With as much as you plan on taking 2 military 5tons i personally think this is not bushcraft. Buy some land, build a cabin and just move in. It sounds like your just moving. With that much food and gear wont take alot of skills past building the cabin.

    Just sounds more survival hero related with 10 tons of gear.

    It does sound fun. On tv the alaska troopers kicked some old man out his shack he had lived in with 9tons less gear for 14 years because he was not the land owner. So yes it can be done. Good luck!
    The amount of gear I want to bring in is primarily food and emergency supplies and is probably over stated. I would like to live off the land, but as Alaska is harsh that is too optimistic and I will simply supplement my food supply with native flora and fauna. Also, I was planning on two 2 1/2 tons or one 5 ton depending on which is cheaper to operate and purchase. After reading McCandless I saw where he went wrong and where I could improve upon his mistakes, so I decided its better to have it and not need it.
    Quote Originally Posted by book View Post
    Check out Ron Brodigan's Great Lakes School of Log Building before you head out. Also you may want to contact Fred Rungee at Salana, Ak. He is in his late eighties and lives in one of the many cabins that he has built over the years. It is a four mile hike to his latest cabin so he had to backpack everything in . He was a Smokejumper, BLM Fire Management Officer, survived a grizzly bear attack, and is an Alaska legend.
    Thank you for the tips. I was hoping for more advice like this not 'well you can't just set up camp in Alaska now' type stuff.

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