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Thread: How do you guys clean your .22 barrels? Just a patch or full scrubbing?

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    Guide Supporter Slips73's Avatar
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    Default How do you guys clean your .22 barrels? Just a patch or full scrubbing?

    Hey everyone just trying to get some opinions on cleaning .22 rifles. When I first started shooting I would clean my .22s with one of those cheapo sectional brass rods after every shooting trip. A few years back though I learned that for the most part that isn't such a good idea, now I just use a two piece bore snake, One is a string with the brush and the other is a the soft cloth like part. How often do you guys clean your barrels. I am thinking that for the most part I would only need a brass brush if I put over 500 rounds through it or so. And just use a patch/cloth otherwise to keep stuff out of the barrel.

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    IMHO any time you fire a rifle and put it away for a duration of time more then a day or two - It needs to be cleaned.
    Depending on the action type; the type of ammo; and how much fouling is present determines which method and how thorough of a cleaning / stripping needs to be done.
    Semi-Autos require more maintenance and are more difficult to clean deeply.
    Bolt rifles are a breeze and easily maintained as are single shots.
    In most cases aside from a semi-auto; a bore snake; a brass brush; a couple Q-tips and a lightly oiled rag with completely clean and protect the rifle.
    Sometimes semi-autos that have had numerous rounds (hundreds) put through them require detailed stripping & some serious solvents, and some picking of the cracks and crevasses to clean thoroughly. Then care taken to assemble and properly lubricate the action with the right stuff to avoid caking and residue build-up.
    The .22 is the most abused and neglected firearm in this country by far - and the better you take care of yours; the fewer problems and failures (as well as how long it will last you and your family) you will have.
    I hope that helps.

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    I pretty much disagree with all of that. I clean a .22 when it quits working. The bore of a centerfire rifle might get cleaned once a year but it will have to be fired 6-8 rounds before it can be hunted with. Modern ammo won't hurt a thing. Cleaning ruins a barrel pretty quickly.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Swampman View Post
    I pretty much disagree with all of that. I clean a .22 when it quits working. The bore of a centerfire rifle might get cleaned once a year but it will have to be fired 6-8 rounds before it can be hunted with. Modern ammo won't hurt a thing. Cleaning ruins a barrel pretty quickly.
    Yah I have read and seen what over cleaning can do to a bore.

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    Call me a gear ***re if you want, but I love the otis cleaning system. I swab my guns after ever session while the barrel is still warm. Rarely need to use a brush. Works for me.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by AnthonySmithXR View Post
    Call me a gear ***re if you want, but I love the otis cleaning system. I swab my guns after ever session while the barrel is still warm. Rarely need to use a brush. Works for me.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Thats exactly what I use

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    Bushmaster Bush Class Basic Certified tennecedar's Avatar
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    For rimfire rifles I usually clean before extended storage and after shooting any soft lead bullets. If I'm shooting copper washed bullets I may go all season without doing any more than oiling down the outside. I can tell a difference in accuracy if I don't clean between lead and copper.

    The majority of my rimfire cleaning is washing powder residue out of a semi auto's action. (99% of my FTF FTE problems have been gummed up moving parts.)

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    I'm with Swampman on this one, .22's really only require cleaning when they start to malfunction or accuracy degrades. The .22 rimfire has been in continuous production in the U.S. longer than any other cartridge and I believe was the first to go to non-mercuric (non-corrosive) priming. That's the main reason you can generally find old .22's with shiny bores, despite not having been well cared for.

    I usually run a bore snake before putting them away, but not always, and depending on the volume of shooting break them down for a thorough cleaning every year or two.

    Back in the late '80's to early '90's there was a Russian import .22 ammo branded "Junior". The cheapest was steel cased and the entire cartridge was lubed with a heavy wax/grease. It sold for about $2.50 per 500 and I fired many thousands of rounds through a 1022, only cleaning when it started to choke. It wasn't a very genteel cleaning regimen either - hose it out with engine degreaser and punch the bore. The rifle was still accurate and reliable when I sold it a few years back.

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    One of Jack O' Connor's pet peaves. Folks wearing out their 22 barrels over cleaning them. I've got a house full of 22's. Brought home a Remington model 41 last night. Just about my fav caliber. Granted a bore not cleaned since the Truman administration could prolly use a patch of Hoppes run thru it. Wouldn't hurt. Biggest thing I see is guns that have had 1000's of shorts run thru em. Need a chamber reaming to get a long rifle to chamber. Or a 22 that has Been dry fired all to pieces.

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    Boresnake

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