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Thread: Mors Pot Cooking/Recipes?

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    Default Mors Pot Cooking/Recipes?

    Hey guys,

    I was wondering what some of you cook in your Mors pots? I've been wanting to give a go at chili or beef stew my next trip, but not sure of the quantity needed to cook in the pot.

    Boiling water and cooking noodles is great, but I want to step it up a notch.

    It would be great to hear some suggestions and or recipes you guys have for the 1.8 pot specifically.

    thanks!

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    The Mors pot is a great piece of gear, and nearly all my camping partners have one except me!

    The 1.8 liter one is a good size for cooking for 2 or maybe three guys, depending on how hungry they are. Here's a quick idea to get things rolling:

    Mors Pot Beef Stew

    1/2 pound cubed stew beef
    2 medium potatoes, diced
    2 medium carrots, thinly sliced like coins
    1 packet of onion soup mix (says it makes 4 cups)
    2 Tablespoons of flour

    Put beef in pot, and add the soup mix. Add water to cover, and hang over fire until it boils. Adjust location for a slow steady boil, adding water as needed. While the meat is cooking, peel and dice the potatoes and carrots. Add the vegetables, and add water up to the rivets. Get the pot back over high heat to boil, and again move aside to simmer until vegetables are done. They should be soft when poked with a sharpened stick. Now mix the flour with a little water to make a thick liquid. Pour it slowly into the pot while stirring with your stick. Let it cook about another minute or two until broth thickens, and serve with some bannock or skillet biscuits. If another guy has a Mors pot, make cowboy coffee in it!

    This stew tastes best after a hike through the woods, while sitting on a stump, far from the sounds of civilization.

    Here's my video with a few variations: I used a tin can instead of a Mors pot, and I had cooked the meat and sliced the carrots before heading to the woods. \

    Last edited by TheProfessor; 03-06-2013 at 08:12 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheProfessor View Post
    Mors Pot Beef Stew
    This sounds yummy! Thanks for sharing.

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    I've got one:

    1.5 cups barley
    1 chopped carrot
    1/2 chopped onion
    1/2lb chopped bacon
    1 chopped celery
    salt, pepper, boullion cube, and a dash-o-whiskey

    Really with stews, just add a bunch of stuff. It's easy to tell if it needs more meat, veg, or grain relative to the other ingredients.

    Barley is the ideal camp grain. No mess like with flour, and can be made into both a convincing dinner and breakfast (eg with cinnamon and sugar). It's very filling (expands a lot when cooking).

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    Excellent video and use of materials! The food looked great!

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    Quote Originally Posted by vakman View Post

    Barley is the ideal camp grain. No mess like with flour, and can be made into both a convincing dinner and breakfast (eg with cinnamon and sugar). It's very filling (expands a lot when cooking).
    Where would be a good place to get barley? Doesn't sound like something I'd find on the flour aisle at work (wal-mart) though I could be wrong.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BreakPapaLizard View Post
    Where would be a good place to get barley? Doesn't sound like something I'd find on the flour aisle at work (wal-mart) though I could be wrong.
    Look where they keep the dried beans, split peas and lentils.
    Dave

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    Thanks I'll have to give it a try TheProfessor! I may do a practice cook this weekend, as I'm planning to do some fishing.

    Vakman- That sounds pretty good too! Never thought about barely that way.

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    This site: The Joy of Field Rations...

    http://joyoffieldrations.blogspot.co.../label/goulash

    has been referenced here before, but this segment is about what you're looking for! European military mess kits seemed to be more about stewing and boiling, and their recipes would work great for your Mors pot. This one is for "goulash" which I would call beef and gravy. This basic recipe could be served over boiled or instant mashed potatoes, noodles, or rice. It could be turned into stew by adding the potatoes and carrots. Since it is from"scratch," you can control the flavor, and sodium content.

    Apparently groups of 4 or 5 guys would cook together using their mess kits, so one pot could cook the meat, another the potatoes, another the coffee, and so on.

    A few months ago, I bought a little cookbook at an antique shop that took this very idea a step further: they called it "Make-ahead beef," which was just the beef and gravy goulash prepared and then frozen. You could freeze the mixture in shapes that would drop into your pot at camp. That way, several meals could be prepared from the basic meat and gravy base, and it would be quicker than waiting for an hour for the meat to get tender.

    Kochgeschirr Cooking 1.jpg
    Last edited by TheProfessor; 03-07-2013 at 08:15 AM.
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    Awesome thread.
    I do have one question, I just picked up a Mors pot and I was curious do yall carry a plate or bowl with your pot or just eat strait out of the pot?

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