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Thread: Crawfish, a staple of the bushcraft pantry

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    Hardwoodsman Supporter Brainchild's Avatar
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    Default Crawfish, a staple of the bushcraft pantry

    Anybody use crawfish for eating while bushcrafting? I have em as often as i can (Summer-fall). They are usually very plentiful where i live and there are few (if any) restrictions on bag limit. How do you like to cook em? How do you like to catch em?

    I'll start.

    I like to boil in hot water after they are done i remove all i am not going to eat and season the rest with bay seasoning and pepper. (Butter if i bring it or oil too)

    Alot of people like to trap em which is easy and effective you can leave the trap out overnight and the traps are quite easy to build. Personally i like to catch by hand with a pair of goggles and any extra fish guts or scrap food. Toss in the food wait maybe .5 hrs and sneak into the water. when you get close enough with your hand grab behind the pincers and apply pressure to the creek bottom and grab em out (Gotta be quick). If they spot ya first then i like to use one hand to distract them while sneaking my other hand behind them and grab em.

    If doing it by hand make sure to change water regularly in storage bucket (or just build a crawfish corral out of stones) Crawfish need a certain amount of oxygen in the water to survive.


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    Hardwoodsman Supporter Brainchild's Avatar
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    BTW wasn't sure if this should go in the Food section or this one. Sorry if it's in the wrong area

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    I use a trap hung off my dock,I put liver flav. can dog food in it.
    Boil then cook tails in butter Missouri Lobster

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    I love crawdads. Cajun style. No better place to grab a plate full than Louisiana. I use a trap here in Idaho and have a couple of spots I get them from.

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    This style minnnow trap is quite effective for minnows and crayfish have been caught as well. The glass jar is to show how it is made and I use it in my display of 19th century fishing nets. In actual use to prevent breakage I put the netting on an empty peanut butter jar. Tony
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    I have the regular basket style trap that comes in 2 halves I use around town or car camping. I just take a cheap can of cat food and poke it full of holes so the juice, aroma, and small pieces of meat can leak out to attract them. Hiking or the bush call for a piece of fishing line with a treble hook and whatever bait is available. Tie it to a stick if you want but pull it in slowly when checking so as not to pull them off. Most of the time they are hard pressed not to give up the goodies and stay on. My fishing experience is what first demonstrated that behavior and you can use it to your advantage. When using the line, if you want to carry a small net so they will float in to it if they drop off can also help. Something like butterfly net material.

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    Cool

    Me and the Old Man catch them by hand when we fish for Bass in a certain honey hole. I haven't looked into the reg's but if there's anywhere in this state to set crawdad traps, that's the place

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    I've seen stow away traps made from hardware mesh. Just gotta untie the pieces and roll it up. You guys ever find the little worm like parasites on their claws or is that a cali thing? I never worried bout em just boiled em off.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pekane View Post
    Me and the Old Man catch them by hand when we fish for Bass in a certain honey hole. I haven't looked into the reg's but if there's anywhere in this state to set crawdad traps, that's the place
    Ok where is honey hole I won't tell

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    Best way i've ever had 'em was steamed first, THEN dunked into the cajun brine. AMAZING.

    We have 'em all over down here... they make little chimneys out of mud pretty much everywhere you go, especially near water. meat on a string, just like crabs... the creeks are too muddy to see them, so i honestly have no idea if they live in our creeks (very unlike my native NY, where they lived under rocks in most creeks. but you could see them because the water was clean and clear.)

    i don't catch 'em wild... just pay the steamer dude to make them for me at $5.95 a pound (now, Lent. they get way cheaper later in the season). but you're right. they are good!
    "Take a course in good water and air; and in the eternal youth of Nature you may renew your own. Go quietly, alone; no harm will befall you." John Muir

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