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Thread: Is there a natural salt source?

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    Scout Survive's Avatar
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    Default Is there a natural salt source?

    Hi there,

    I was playing with the hypotheticals and wondered how one would get salt in the wild?
    Let's say we are in a cabin deep in the woods for a year...

    Salt.. well sodium is essential to keep the heart muscle beating properly. So this would make it an essential nutrient. I know that you can boil down hickory roots. The crystal stuff left over after you've boiled off the water is salt. But, here in eastern Ontario, hickory trees are hard to come by.

    I have asked several bushcrafty types of people question and it has only served to make them start inquiring themselves. So though I would run this question by you folks here and see if you have an answer to this question of mine that has my brain gears grind to a halt with a question mark!

    I know that blood has sodium in it, so I would think that technically, if you were to use the blood of fresh kill to cook or make sausage... it might help. My folks were in Europe during WWII and I know that not a single scrap was wasted, so they even made blood sausage from the freshly killed animals.

    Any suggestions would be most welcome.
    Would love to know any natural sources you guys/gals can think of.

    One of my friends suggested trying to rinse the gravel at the sides of highways, as salt is put on roads... I was looking for a more natural source.

    Are any of you Native? Am trying to figure out how the early Natives, would have gotten sodium in their diet. They obviously lived off the land, so it can obviously be done.

    Thanks!

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    ive thought of this as well to no avail other than bodies of water or the mineral deposits

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    I've heard that salt was the first traded resource, but that before it was traded people did without it, in purified form that is. Like so many elements of our modern diets, I consider it to be superfluous, or directly substitutable, beat natural means. i imagine blood was the primary source.

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    I know I read about lewis and clark I believe boiling down salt water to get the salt.
    Also there are natural salt licks but I am not sure how to find them.
    There was a thread a while back about this that had some good links in it.

    Sent from my Galaxy Nexus using Tapatalk 2

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    In many areas there are natural salt licks, and also often salt laden springs or streams. As a youngster we hunted on a ranch where the creek was slightly salty. It left crystals on the rocks when it went down from evaporation in the summer. A man with a large flat surface- metal or rock- could easily have gotten considerable salt by evaporation over a few days.

    In South America, there was a tribe in the Amazon who had no salt sources at all, and they learned to burn a particular types of wood and use the ashes in their cooking. It was found that the ash contained enough trace salt to satisfy minimum nutritional requirements.
    Nemo me impune lacessit ! Wisdom is knowing what to do; Skill is knowing how to do it ; Character is what lets you actually do the job.
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    When you smoke meat, you add sodium nitrate. Not sure if that is an adequate source of dietary sodium?

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    My wife and I took a hike with a park interpreter at Mount Petit Jean here in Arkansas earlier this week and he mentioned this exact thing. He said that the native americans of the area would boil water and scrape the salt off the pot. They wouldn't get much which would make it very valuable. I checked out a few websites that might help.

    http://www.encyclopediaofarkansas.ne...px?entryID=567

    http://www.crt.state.la.us/archaeolo.../SALT/hist.htm

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    We get natural sea salt evaporated in higher tide pools along rocky coastlines. Secluded coastlines much better to avoid pollution from humans. Where I used to fish along the secluded Kahikinui coast of Maui where 4x4 was necessary to gain access good place to get this mineral rich sea salt. Also the wild goats and sometimes deer would come down to lick the salt off the rocks along the tide pools so I'd always have a rifle handy in the truck, and many times get to pop a wild goat. Surf & turf!

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    Quote Originally Posted by vakman View Post
    I've heard that salt was the first traded resource, but that before it was traded people did without it, in purified form that is. Like so many elements of our modern diets, I consider it to be superfluous, or directly substitutable, beat natural means. i imagine blood was the primary source.
    Yeah, you wouldn't think much about it today but salt has been an immensly improtant commodity for much of human history. I read this book (Salt) a year or two ago and found it incredibly interesting.

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    Humans can get along without processed salt, although it's use as a food preservative made it incredibly valuable. There's been a few books published on the topic. "Salt, A World History" is a good read: http://www.amazon.com/Salt-World-His.../dp/0142001619

    This is a good read on salt in North America: http://www.crt.state.la.us/archaeolo.../SALT/SALT.HTM

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