(B) Student Practice Tree Identification

Discussion in 'BushClass USA' started by abo4ster, Apr 20, 2011.

  1. NorthernOwl

    NorthernOwl Tracker

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    1. Saskatoon aka service berry
    My uses are berries and i use it to make self bows.
    20160915_191912.jpg

    2. Chokecherry
    My uses are berries for jam and wine, and for bows again. 20160915_192756.jpg

    3. Paper Birch
    My uses are birch tar made from birch bark and chaga that grows exclusively on birch trees.[​IMG]

    4. Trembling Aspen
    My uses are i make arrows from self harvested logs. And i use the inner bark in home medicines it acts like asprin.
    20160915_191736.jpg

    5. Willow
    My willow uses are weaving baskets with willow whips. And i am going to use the leaves to get tannins to tan hides eventually. 20160915_192318.jpg
     

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  2. JosephDurham

    JosephDurham Supporter Supporter

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    Tulip Poplar
    Liriodendron Tulipifera
    They grow to be upwards of 120 feet
    Amazing fire starter
    Can be used for cordage
    The inner bark has been used for inflammation of sores, fever, upset stomachs, tooth aches, and cough syrup
    Wonderful resource for building structures: houses, quivers, containers, baskets, et cetera



    Sweet Gum
    Liquidambar Styraciflua
    Growing as tall as 80’
    The sap can be gathered and used to treat skin irritation
    Many have used it within tobacco as a sleeping agent
    Chewing gum
    The sap can be used to treat coughs, sore throats, colds, diarrhea
    The leaf contains oils that are in some ways antimicrobial



    Pin Oak
    Quercus palustris
    These trees can find their way up to 72’ in length
    They are found abundantly in areas that are highly saturated which would lead to a good water source location
    Used a great deal in construction and as firewood
    Native Americans used the bark of the pin oak to treat intestinal pain



    Yellow Buckeye
    Aesculus Flava
    Can reach a height of 100’, however, 60-75’ is the average
    The seeds of these are poisonous if eaten raw
    Typically used for crates, boxes, and cheap furniture due to the weakness of the tree
    One of the most interesting facts that I found during my research is that the insides of the seeds, when they are infused with hot water can actually be used as a soap for the body or clothing, but can leave a nasty odor




    Red Maple
    Acer Rubrum
    Reaching up to 90’, but have been found to reach 115’
    The bark has been used in the treatment of sore eyes, as well as cramps and dysentery
    The inside of the bark, if boiled with lead can be used as an ink sourse
    Extremely fast growing to replenish the woodlands
    The sap contains sugar and can be used as a drink or as a sweetener on many foods
    It can be used as maple syrup, however, the amount obtained after boiling is much less than that of the sugar maple
     
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  3. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Dawn Supporter

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    created a full document for my Tree Identification Project (which I want to continue beyond the Bushclass requirement), so I'll just list the trees and give the link to the public document.

    NJHeart2Heart's Tree Identification, Part 1

    1. Witch Hazel
    2. Yellow Poplar
    3. White Pine
    4. American Beech
    5. Yellow Birch
    6. Red Oak (yep.. bonus entry)

    Here are just a few pictures, including some comparisons:

    Left: Big Toothed Aspen, Right: Yellow Birch
    30224806165_b3afbe0826_z.jpg

    Oh so lovely Yellow Birch bark :)

    30224819095_d4f2d71413_z.jpg

    Top: Red Oak, Bottom: White Oak
    30225225405_b0a3842a8a_z.jpg

    Probably my favorite comparison to date:
    Left: Yellow Birch, Right: American Beech

    29595114654_cdb35eb20e_z (1).jpg

    I find the "weird" leaves fun to identify. Here we have:
    Left: Sassafras, Right: Yellow Poplar, "Tulip Tree"

    30111644142_ae47af2f0a_z.jpg

    I had these two confused until I looked them up several times:
    Left: Red Maple (remember this by rough (serrated) edges), Right: Sugar Maple (remembered by the smooth edges)
    29597390273_58d779424c_z.jpg
     

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    Last edited: Oct 13, 2016
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  4. Lucho

    Lucho Tracker Bushclass I

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    Went out walking through the bush today. There are about five trees that look very similar, so I thought I'd use these five as the ones to identify, just so I could learn them. The leaves were fairly similar, which made identification that much harder, but now I know what they are. lol

    Common /Scientific Name
    Description of Tree
    Two Uses


    Little Leaf Linden
    Tilia cordata

    Tilia cordata is a deciduous tree growing to 66–131 ft tall, diameter 1/3 to 1/2 the height, with a trunk up to 1 m diameter. The bark is smooth and grayish when young, firm with vertical ridges and horizontal fissures when older. The crown is rounded in a formal oval shape to pyramidal. Branching is upright and increases in density with age

    Soft wood is good for carving as well as for bowdrill hearth and spindle.
    In Norse cultures, maidens “dance wildly around the village linden” in hopes of improving their fertility. Dancing maidens is never a bad thing to have around.


    Eastern Cottonwood
    Populus deltoides

    Populus deltoides is a large tree growing to 65–130 ft tall and with a trunk up to 1.8 m (5 ft 11 in) diameter, one of the largest North American hardwood trees. The bark is silvery-white, smooth or lightly fissured when young, becoming dark gray and deeply fissured on old trees. The twigs are grayish-yellow and stout, with large triangular leaf scars.

    Live for 200 to 400 years (!)
    The bark tincture can been used to treat rheumatism, gout, and scurvy and infections of the chest.
    Used by Amerindians as a folk cancer remedy.


    Aspen
    Populus tremula

    It is a substantial deciduous tree growing to 66 ft tall by 33 ft broad, with a trunk up to 3 ft in diameter. The bark is pale greenish-grey and smooth on young trees with dark grey diamond-shaped lenticels, becoming dark grey and fissured on older trees. The adult leaves, produced on branches of mature trees, are nearly round, slightly wider than long.

    Slow to burn, it’s good for saunas.
    Slow to rot, it makes great roofing shingles.
    Good for pine pitch sticks as it doesn’t burn easily.
    They spread by root suckers, so the organism itself lives under ground in the root structure, unlike other trees that grow from seeds. To this end, the tree “organism” can live for thousands of years and can extend across many hectares.


    Quaking Aspen
    Populus tremuloides

    A tall, fast growing tree, usually 65–80 ft at maturity, with a trunk 8 inches to 2 feet 7 inches in diameter.
    The bark is relatively smooth, colored greenish-white to gray, and is marked by thick black horizontal scars and prominent black knots.

    Bark contains a substitute for quinine.
    The leaves are food for caterpillars, and as such, can be a location to catch caterpillars.
    The wood is very light, so good in construction in which weight may be a factor.
    Parallel vertical scars are tell-tale signs of elk, which strip off aspen bark with their front teeth. Good hunting sign to watch for.


    American Basswood
    Tilia americana

    The American basswood is a medium-sized to large deciduous tree reaching a height of 60 to 120 ft with a trunk diameter of 3–5 ft at maturity. The crown is domed, the branches spreading, often pendulous. The bark is gray to light brown, with narrow, well defined fissures.

    Can live up to 200 years (!)
    Young leaves can be eated.
    Makes an excellent wood for bowdrill heath and spindle.
     

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  5. Mama Bears Backpack

    Mama Bears Backpack Tracker Bushclass I

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    Lucho, very nice to zee. I will present my lesson results within these pages soon. Thank you for sharing the link to this opportunity. I will continue to learn beside you my woodchuck friend.
     
  6. Claudiasboris

    Claudiasboris Tracker

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    Here are a few notable trees from Yorkshire. My local woods are far from ancient and many of the trees are rather juvenile. I also took many of the photographs recently, which wasn't too clever of me considering it's Autumn.

    Scots pine (pin us sylvestris)

    Britain's only native pine, it can grow up to 35 to 40 metres tall. Tends to have a slender trunk which turns reddy brown and flaky when mature. The cone is conical.
    Leaves: blue grey, in pairs, 4 to 7 cm long.
    Cones: conical.

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Uses: firewood, straight trunk makes good lumber of masts and the resin has been used to seal planks and barrels when made into a pitch. Treesforlife.org notes that scots pine has been used as a landscape marker. In the Scottish Highlands it can mark the burials of chieftains and warriors. In the lowlands and England it has been used to mark tracks, especially droveways.




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  7. Claudiasboris

    Claudiasboris Tracker

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    Pendiculate oak (quercus robur)

    Also known as English oak. Tall, up to 40 metres high, the bark is grey, cracked and ridged. Deciduous.
    Leaves: irregularly lobed, with 2 pointing backwards at the base.
    Fruit: acorns, form on long stalks (as opposed to sessile oak with no stalk).

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Uses: the timber is durable and has been used for everything from buildings to furniture. The wood makes good firewood when aged and dry. The acorns can be used to make flour and coffee; it has also been fodder for animals.
    Oak also has a high value to wildlife, one tree sustaining a large ecosystem.
    It also has strong British traditions, being sacred to the Druids and a symbol of strength in England.


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  8. Claudiasboris

    Claudiasboris Tracker

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    Rowan (sorbus aucuparia)

    Also known as mountain ash.
    Delicate deciduous tree up to 15 metres tall.
    Leaves: pinnate, with toothed leaflets in pairs (up to 15 on one leaf).
    Fruit: round, bright scarlet.
    Common in upland areas and acidic soil.

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Uses: firewood, but not great. The berries are most useful and can be made into jelly or even brewed into ale. They have also been used for baiting traps for birds.


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  9. Claudiasboris

    Claudiasboris Tracker

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    White willow (salix alba)

    Very similar to s. fragilis, crack willow and many are probably hybrids.
    Deciduous, 15 to 20 metres tall, the bark is grey-brown with deep fissures.
    Leaves: long and narrow, pale on the underside.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    The tree pictured has leaves that look more crack than white and I have definitely heard the crack when its branches break. However, in summer the leaves are most definitely grey/green on the underside so I figure it's a hybrid.

    Uses: always grows near water so is a good indicator of streams or rivers.
    The bark has anti-inflammatory and antiseptic uses and is the traditional base of aspirin.
    The stems are flexible and are good for weaving.
    The wood itself is good for making cricket bats and whistles.


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  10. Claudiasboris

    Claudiasboris Tracker

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    Silver birch (betula pendula)

    A quick growing tree, one of the first to colonise an area, but rarely live past 100 years. Can grow to 20 to 30 metres. The bark is a distinctive silver or white with black patches.
    Leaves: oval and toothed with a pointed tip.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Uses: resinous wood that burns fierce but fast; the bark makes for a great tinder though and catches sparks easily.
    Improves the soil by bringing up deep nutrients and making them available for surrounding plants.
    Creates a habitat for hundreds of insect species which can form the base for an impressive ecosystem.
    Associated with numerous fungi, many of which have specific uses, such as birch polypore (razor strop).
    Birch brooms are used for purification and driving out spirits.


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  11. Claudiasboris

    Claudiasboris Tracker

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    Sorry that I took up a lot of posts: it seemed the most sensible way to do it at the time.

    Here are the books that I used for reference:

    [​IMG]

    The Hobbit Moleskin is my bushcraft notebook.

    Thanks to all involved in creating this. I've wanted to be better at tree identification for years and this has given me a great impetus. It's also created a fantastic resource.


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  12. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Dawn Supporter

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    Love the photo. What a great comparison of similar leaves! I think I'll edit my above post to include a few comparison photos :)
     
  13. Mama Bears Backpack

    Mama Bears Backpack Tracker Bushclass I

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    I've wanted to get into tree Id. I found these quite easily, finding the uses is a bit more depth that I needed to research. I will now have to challenge myself to find 5 additional trees because these ones were already familiar to me.

    I will break this into 5 posts for simplicity.

    Sugar Maple, Acer Saccharum. Leaves lobed, hairless, 3-7 inches. Growth 70-100 feet tall, 60-80 feet broad. Seeds are formed in double winged "keys" that flutter on the wind for seed dispersion.

    Can be tapped (2 taps per average tree) for sap in the early spring until the tops start to turn pink at which point the sap becomes bitter. Sap can be used as a water source if fresh water is not available in the spring. Sap can be boiled down to 1/10th it's original volume to give the well known maple syrup. Maple trees provide a great amount of shade, provide hard wood for wood projects and burning.

    This second picture shows the bark at different ages of growth.

    20161018_120922.jpg 20161018_122234.jpg
     
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  14. Mama Bears Backpack

    Mama Bears Backpack Tracker Bushclass I

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    White Birch. Betula papyrifera Slight heart/spade shaped leaf with serrated toothed edge. White barked tree with paper like shedding bark. Catkins that look almost like a caterpillar develop in the spring. These trees grow quickly, are relatively short lived in the other wise older forest around them. Although they are a hardwood, they also rot very quickly once they are on the ground.

    The bark from these trees can be uses as tinder that takes a spark quite easily. Thicker layers can be scraped up to create a little more hardy tinder, as well as being sliced off in sheets to make basket or container like projects and historically was used by native cultures to make canoes.

    These trees are known for being one of a very few species that Chaga can grow on. Chaga is a fungus that grows out of the side of the still living tree. Chaga has been scientifically studied for its medicinal properties and is touted as a miracle product. These trees can be tapped and the sap can be used for water, or as with maple, boiled down to make a syrup, usually late March or early April.

    20161018_122545.jpg 20161018_130806.jpg
     
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  15. Mama Bears Backpack

    Mama Bears Backpack Tracker Bushclass I

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    Pine. I am not sure what "type" of pine this is. Recognizing pine seperate from spruce or cedar comes with experience. The cone type opens out similar to what we think of as a typical "christmas tree"a wide based, narrow topped with thick petals on a conical shape.

    There are 40 varieties of pine trees. I suspect the ones I have here are red pine from looking at the red tint in the bark. These trees were very straight, and tall with branches only at the top of the forest canopy, but I was in a planted forest that had been managed for decades and this may be an artificial feature caused by pruning. In these pictures you can see well the growth of the branches all coming out in a layer, all around the trunk. Pine has this distinct growth habit, and knowing that helps in the identity process. Being a coniferous tree, It grows needles not leaves, and keeps its needles year round, making these trees are easy to identify in the winter as well.

    A soft wood, the resinous wood of pine trees can be used for fires, but is too resinous for home heating. With lower branches that die off, and are within reach, cones and needles littering the forest floor, there is always a part of the tree suitable forgetting that fire started.

    The needles can be gathered and chopped, brought to a boil in clean water, and this tea has a high vitamin content. Younger new paler green growth is best. Sap from this tree has medicinal properties for wound care. Inner bark can be used for covering wounds or sliced thin and fried to be used as a food source, pine bacon.

    Old fallen trees and stumps can provide segments with higher resin than the rest of the tree, and this resinous wood is our flammable fatwood.
    Many many more uses that are worth learning.
    20161018_120805.jpg 20161018_120810.jpg 20161018_120820.jpg 20161018_121106.jpg 20161018_121111.jpg 20161018_120820.jpg
     
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  16. Mama Bears Backpack

    Mama Bears Backpack Tracker Bushclass I

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    In my area of southern Ontario there is mention of the Alderville Black Oak Savanna. Where I have been hiking and taking these tree pictures isn't far from this area, so I "assume" the oaks I've snapped are black oak. Black oak leaves have a sharper point to the typical oak leaf shape. But regardless of leaf shape, all oak species have acorns that would be a dead give away. Oak is well known as a building material, oak cabinets and the like are common. Oak being a hardwood burns well and hot. Oak trees live hundreds of years in ideal situations, and they can grow to be massive. They provide shade, and temperature influences in a yard where they shelter our homes from wind and sun block. Acorns from the trees can be used as food, nuts can be used fresh, or dried. The nuts can be processed into grits, or dipped in a hot carmelized sugar mix and allowed to cool to become a candied nut. , or roasted and ground into flour for baking. These little gems can also be roasted and ground to brew up as a coffee, or hot beverage. 1/2 a cup of roasted acorn meal, boiled for 15 minutes in 4 cups of water.


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  17. Mama Bears Backpack

    Mama Bears Backpack Tracker Bushclass I

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    Mountain Ash, or Rowan Berry. This tree has often been considered to have toxic berries. This is not true. The berries are bitter, but not toxic. Folk lore also says this trees production of fruit indicates what type of winter we will have. I haven't seen this to be conclusive. Some years the trees are heavily laden with their deep orange clusters of berries, and some years they are sparse, but I think it is more likely an indication of how healthy the population of pollinating insects is in the area.

    I must admit I haven't seen many of these out in the forests or woods. I see them in my area mostly in urban settings.
    This is a smaller tree as far as trees go. About 30ft high, with a rounded contained growth habit rather than sprawling branches.

    Two reference books I am using have different latin names. One calls it pyrus americana and one calls it sorbus americana, (or decors, depending on the specifics) The leaves of these trees show as opposite leaflets on a long stem.

    The fruit, berries, become better after having been frozen a few times, so this is a winter harvest. The berries can be sweetened and stewed and used like cranberries, or made into a marmalade type jelly, or made into a fruit pie, or condiment accompaniment for game.

    If you've read any Harry Potter, you may have heard of Rowanwood Wands. Turned from the wood of these trees. There are occasionally burls in these trees as well, and wood workers covet burl wood for turning bowls and other designs because of the intricate grain.

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  18. Wolfcri

    Wolfcri Adventurer Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    White Birch
    bark for containers, root bark and leaves for tea
    IMG_5866.JPG



    Sweetgum
    gum for chewing and tinctures, inner bark as poultice for wound care
    IMG_5868.JPG



    Holly
    tea for joint pain, fermented bark of young shoots for birdlime
    IMG_5872.JPG



    Black Oak
    tannin, acorn flour
    IMG_5871.JPG
    IMG_5870.JPG



    Red Maple
    syrup, remedy for muscle aches
    IMG_5876.JPG
    IMG_5869.JPG
     

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  19. Bushcraft Grizz

    Bushcraft Grizz Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    Tree ID and uses
    20161125_160155.jpg 20161125_160141.jpg
    Eastern white pine, Pinus strobus. Evergreen with 5 needles per bundle. Needles make a tea high in vitamin C, nuts can be roasted, inner bark can be used for flour. The resin can be used for a waterproof glue
    20161125_153833.jpg 20161125_204245.jpg
    White oak, Quercus alba. Deciduous hardwood with light colored scaly bark, leaves are rounded lobed. Acorns can be used for a coffee or flour. Animals usually prefer the acorns over others. Bark tannins used for tanning
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    Yellow/ tulip poplar, Liriodendron tulipifera. Deciduous straight trunked, high canopy, bark is smooth but furrowed. Great wood for bow drill sets, fibrous inner bark for cordage or tinder, bark can be peeled and used for containers
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    Red maple, Acer rubrum. Deciduous, leaves have small toothed edges, young bark is smooth older bark is scaly and darker. Sap can be a water substitute or boiled for syrup. It's a good wood for carving things like spoons or bowls
    20161123_130756.jpg 20161123_130848.jpg
    Eastern red cedar, Juniperus virginiana. Evergreen conifer, small sharp needles, scaly fibrous brown bark. Roots used for cordage, bark is great tinder, dry wood can be used for bow drill sets

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  20. himesrun

    himesrun Supporter Supporter

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    I've been putting this one off because it's winter and thus no leaves but I went ahead and did it anyway. This was actually a pretty fun project. I figured out that I don't know as much as I thought I did about tree identification. My Peterson Field Guide will definitely be staying in my pack for a while.

    1. Eastern Red Cedar (Juniperus virginiana L.)
    Description: medium sized tree with both scale-like and longer sharply 3-sided, needle-like leaves, bark is dry, shreddy and not rigid
    Uses: can be use for all components of a bow drill set, outer bark can be used for tinder and inner bark and roots for cordage, boughs used for bedding

    IMG_1684.JPG
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    2.Black Walnut (Juglans nigra L.)
    Description: has alternate, feather-compound leaves with 7-17 narrow, toothed leaflets. Bark is dark and deeply grooved with non-shiny ridges
    Uses: nuts can be eaten and can be added to pemmican, husks can be used for stain, tannin from the bark can be used to tan animal skins, medicinal uses include purging the body of parasites and using as an antibacterial

    black walnut.jpg
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    3. Red Mulberry (Morus rubra L.)
    Description: bark is red/brown, leaves are "sandpapery" on top and hairy beneath, has toothed leaves with lobed and unlobed foliage present on the same tree
    Uses: berries can be eaten raw or dried and added to pemmican, berries can be used for trap bait, wine making, syrup and dye, roots can be used for cordage

    IMG_1677.JPG
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    mulberry.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2017
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  21. himesrun

    himesrun Supporter Supporter

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    4. Silver Maple (Acer saccharinum L.)
    Description: tall tree with older bark that tends to flake off leaving brown spots, deeply 5-lobed leaves with base of terminal leaf narrowed, broken twigs have unpleasant odor
    Uses: can harvest and drink sap in late winter/early spring for an energy drink that doesn't need purified, can use sap to make syrup, seeds can be boiled and eaten, young leaves can be eaten, branches work well for cooking, inner bark can be cooked, dried and ground into powder to thicken soups

    IMG_1675.JPG
    IMG_1676.JPG
    silver-maple-leaf.jpg

    5. Norway Spruce (Picea abies L. karst)
    Description
    : Conifer, twigs are hairless, needles are four sided, twigs and branches hang downward and is the only spruce that has drooping branches, cones are 4-6" long
    Uses: roots can be used for cordage, resin can be used as glue, antiseptic and wound closure, can make tea from needles, boughs used for bedding, smaller branches can be used to weave baskets

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    Last edited: Jan 18, 2017
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  22. vikingmedic

    vikingmedic Tracker

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    Like others I will be adding my 5 trees as separate posts.

    Tree 1:
    Common Name: White Pine
    Latin Name: Pinus Strobus
    Description: grows 80'-110' tall with needles that are 2"-4" long that grow in groups of 5 to a bundle. The bark is not scaly like other pines but is dark with deep furrows.
    Uses: it's a soft wood so it can be used for friction fires and the lumber is used extensively for construction
     

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  23. vikingmedic

    vikingmedic Tracker

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    Tree 2:

    Common Name: Eastern Hemlock
    Latin Name: Tsuga Canadensis
    Description: Needles are 5/16"-9/16" long and attached to the twig by slender stalks. The bark is dark and rough. The needles have a whiten underside
    Uses: Used mostly as railroad ties because they hold spikes very well and there is an increased use in construction. The dried twigs were taught to us in Boy Scouts as an excellent use as kindling because they catch fire very easily.
     

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  24. vikingmedic

    vikingmedic Tracker

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    Tree 3:

    Common Name: Gray Birch
    Latin Name: Betula Populifolia
    Description: it's a many stemmed tree with chalky white bark. It has triangular, tapered leaves. It has narrow horizontal marks like all birch trees.
    Uses: can be used for fire fuel or charcoal. And can be used for small woodenware.
     

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  25. vikingmedic

    vikingmedic Tracker

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    Tree 4:

    Common Name: Black Oak
    Latin Name: Quercus Velutina
    Description: Leaves are generally glossy above and mostly hairless beneath. Twigs are angled and hairless. The truck is dark and blocky and it produces acorns that have a bowl shaped cup. Leaves have teeth similar to Red Oaks
    Uses: Bark is rich in tannin and can be use to tan hides and the acorns can be ground up and flushed with hot water to remove the tannic acid and made into flour for cooking.
     

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  26. vikingmedic

    vikingmedic Tracker

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    Tree 5:

    Common Name: Eastern Redcedar
    Latin Name: Juniperus Virginiana
    Description: Needles are scale-like are about 1/4" in length. Bark is dry and "shreddy". It grows in dry soils and old fields.
    Uses: the heartwood is aromatic, strong and durable. As such it is used in things like cedar chests and cabinets. When the outer bark is stripped and roughed up it makes a great source of tinder for flint and steel fire making.
     

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  27. Jeff B.

    Jeff B. Tracker

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    1) Common name: Loblolly Pine or Southern Yellow Pine
    Latin name: Pinus Taeda L.
    Description:softwood, needles 6-9 inches long, cones are cylindrical, 3-6 inches long and prickly.
    Uses: 1) used alot in building materials for homes and is considered the most commercially important tree in the Southern US. 2) Good source of "fat wood."
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    2) Common Name: American Holly
    Latin Name: Ilex Opaca Ait.
    Description: prickly and shiny evergreen leaves that are 2 to 4 inches long
    Uses: 1) Holly lumber is used piano keys 2) tea made from leaves treats colds and pneumonia.
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    3) Common Name: Atlantic White Cedar
    Latin Name: Chamaecyparis Thyoides (L.) B.S.P.
    Description: Softwood, small to medium size tree with needle like leaves
    Uses: 1) Shipbuilding 2) wooden ware
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    4) Common Name:Beech
    Latin Name: Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.
    Description: Hardwood, smooth gray bark, alternate composition
    Uses: 1) tool handles 2) excellent long-burning firewood
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    5) Common Name: River Birch
    Latin Name: Betula nigra L.
    Description: shaggy bark of a red-brown color
    Uses: 1) Native americans boiled the sap to use as a sweetener 2) bark is a great source of tinder
    IMG_2957.JPG
     

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  28. jswi2374

    jswi2374 Scout Bushclass I

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    Finally, my last class for Bushcraft Basic! This would have been so much easier in the summer!
    1. Common Apple
    Malus pumila
    small tree with deciduous leaves
    elliptic leaves with pointed tip, green yellow or red fruit
    cider, tool handles, firewood / charcoal, deer and hog bait
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    2. Common Juniper
    Juniperus communis
    scalelike leaves with grey-blue berries, open crown, 5 - 25 ft. tall
    berries may be chewed to freshen breath, bedding material, shelter material
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    3. Eastern White Pine
    Pinus strobus
    needles in bunches of 5, 4 - 8' cones with white resin at tips, tiers of branches, 80 - 150ft. tall
    needles may be boiled for tea, inner bark may be eaten, dry needles make good bedding and tinder
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    4. Honey Locust
    Gleditsia triacanthos
    medium size tree with binnately compound leaves that turn yellow in fall.
    thorns can be used as sewing needles or fishhooks
    young saplings are flexible enough to weave together for shelter
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    5. Sugar Maple
    Acer saccharum
    5 lobed leaves that turn red or gold in the fall, grey-blue bark, smooth when young, plated when old
    good wood for building shelters, seeds are edible and sweet, squirrels love them for food and nesting, leaves are good insulators
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  29. lone_woodsman

    lone_woodsman Supporter Supporter

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    Location:
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    My resource book
    [​IMG]
    1. Table Mountain Pine ( Pinus Pungens )
    Description-
    single or multiple crooked trunks,wide irregular crown
    the needles are stiff and pointed,very sappy
    2 uses-
    1 the sap is a good flame extender and can be used to make pitch glue
    2 the wood is good for fires ( fatwood )
    [​IMG] this is a young one

    2.Red Maple ( Acer Rubrum )
    Description-
    smooth bark with thin cracks,leaves are lobed and have a red stem,wood is hard
    2 uses-
    1. the sap can be used to make syrup
    2.you can make tea from the inner bark
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    3. Eastern White Pine ( Pinus Strobus )
    Description is one of the largest conifers in pa,the needles are 5 per cluster and they are soft and flexible,it can grow 70 to 100 ft tall
    2 uses-
    1. pine needle tea
    2. the needles make a nice bedding material
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    4. Red Oak (Quercus Rubra )
    Description
    single straight trunk,bark is light gray with narrow cracks,the wood has a reddish brown color
    2 uses-
    1. wood is used to make furniture, I made a bucksaw from red oak
    2. good as a shade tree
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    5. Grey Birch ( Betula Populifolia )
    Description
    fast growing,10 to 30 ft tall,bark is chalky white and non-peeling,it likes moist soil,leaves are simple and shaped kinda like an arrow head
    2 uses
    1. you can drink the sap
    2. the inner bark can be cooked or dried then ground into a meal
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
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  30. CHIPPS09

    CHIPPS09 Tracker

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    Location:
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    This is my student tree id...these are the books I use...

    20170202_080840.jpg
    My first tree is a Douglas fir...pseudotsuna menziesii ..it is a conifer
    Used in lumber for construction ....Cone gathering is a source of income...
    Its stumpage is good for fatwood
    20170130_084956.jpg

    My second tree is ..Tamrac pine....Pines contorta.... it is a conifer
    Has been used for shingles for construction ..make tea...ornamental shade tree, dry undergrowth kindling
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    My third tree is western red cedar.. Thuja contorta..it is a conifer
    Its uses ...shakes and shingles for construction... bark is good for basket weaving ....
    ....scrapping makes good tinder stumpage good source for shavings.

    20170202_082054.jpg 20170202_082126.jpg

    My 4 tree is the giant sequoia... Sequoiadendron giganteum...it is a conifer
    It is an environmental key species some 2200 years old. Makes good wind break... tinder for stick stoves
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    My 5th. tree is red alder..Alnus rubra it is a deciduous hardwood tree..it us used for carving..smoking fish , fire wood..

    20170202_093125.jpg 20170202_092540.jpg
     

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    Last edited: Feb 2, 2017
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  31. LJHfrstr

    LJHfrstr Supporter Supporter

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    Location:
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    5 trees and their uses:

    Eastern Red Cedar
    Juniperus virginiana
    a) Great for tinder from bark. b) Makes for a good hearth for friction fire. Also good for bushcraft structures as it does not rot easily and deters bugs. Easily identifiable as evergreen and bark is unmistakable.
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    Tulip Poplar:
    Liriodendron tulipifera
    a) soft wood makes it great for spoon/utensil carving. b)easiest wood in my acreage to make feathers with. Also fantastic (I think better) for friction fires. Makes great hearths and a lot of the branches are nice and straight for making spindles.
    Easily identifiable with older trees as those tulip "blossoms" are on the tree year round; new grown in the spring and the "husks" get left behind all winter.
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    White Pine:
    Pinus strobus
    a) FAT WOOD! b) Fresh needles make a nice tea. Also, everything about this wood is great for tinder; the fatwood, the needles, the pinecones. Easily identifiable as an evergreen and the bark is unmistakable.
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    Willow Oak:
    Quercus phellos
    a) another good tree for friction fires; good spindles and hearths. b) excellent for twig fires - lots of small, quick drying branches make twig collection easy.
    Easily identifiable with the elongated leaves and is relatively fast growing for a hardwood.
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    Bitternut Hickory:
    Carya cordiformis
    a) strips of bark from branches makes good natural cordage b) great for ax and hatchet handles. Young grown has also made for some good hiking sticks for the kids. Identifiable with the leaf structure and small, dense nuts.
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