Baby steps toward "cold weather" camping success

Discussion in 'Winter Camping' started by NJHeart2Heart, Dec 20, 2016.

  1. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Dawn Supporter

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    I was reading on someone doing a winter camping event, which got me to pondering some ideas. I posted about it saying "I thought to myself, at my age (40's) with chronic back pain and high cold sensitivity, I'll probably never get to the point of doing a winter overnight - even a "glamping" version - on purpose."

    @rsnurkle responded "This isn't answering the question you asked, but I wonder if figuring out how to sleep comfortably (or at least without dire consequences to your back) in places other than your bed would actually be one of the most helpful preps you could undertake? I ask this in hopes it will motivate you to keep looking for a solution to that problem, instead of getting stuck into the idea of a forced march in the dark as your primary get-home option."

    rsnukle had an excellent point - not only on the specific context but the general principles of
    1. finding creative ways to overcome a physical challenge, and
    2. attitude and habit of looking for solutions vs. getting "stuck" into a negative self stereotype (I'm extrapolating specific comments to "bigger picture" ideas - hope you don't mind @rsnurkle!)

    So, in thinking more about it, I divided my "problem" into 2 smaller denominators:
    #1 Back problems (and general physical sensitivity) making primitive overnight sleeping extremely uncomfortable and possible increasing back issues, and
    #2 High temperature sensitivity rendering "average" means of warmth considerably less effective.

    On the level of the specific context and problem, I'm kind of proud to report that I did take a small step towards working through this "barricade". Last Friday I spent a night in my living room with my new sleeping bag and sleeping pad. It seems silly, but going from a Temperpedic mattress (#1 factor) and an especially warm fuzzy blanket above the floor (#2 factor), to an outdoor sleep system (#1) ON the floor (it is colder on the floor- even IN my own house!)(#2) was a significant enough diversion from my level of comfort to give me a challenge. It was a good experiment, although I do wonder if I could separate them even further to perfect solutions for each before trying to put them together.

    I am planning to do more tent only overnights in warm weather and, after recent experiences, I would be willing to do a "cool weather" overnight in a primitive cabin. The idea of a cabin as an "intermediate" step is appealing to me, and if I think about it, there are probably many more "baby steps" I can take towards broadening my experiences with bushcraft. This leads me to

    My philosophical take away from this was that when you are trying to solve a problem, it's important to make sure the problem is divided into in it's lowest common denominators - in other words, one "problem" can often be two or more issues, and separating them out to deal with each one at a time can be a huge benefit to figuring out the best solution(s). The other big idea here, is that when I look at a place/goal I want to be at, and I then look at where I am, the solution doesn't have to be all at once/all in one. I can take small incremental steps towards that goal, and those steps might entail different factors of the challenge. The latter steps will be those where I take the solutions for those various issues and bring them together into a holistic solution.
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2016
  2. Moondog55

    Moondog55 Guide

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    Well you have already realised why we place so much emphasis on the mattress system.
    I'll put in a plug for the S2S Comfort plus insulated mattress here, not exactly UL but very comfortable. There are warmer mats around but none I've found to be as comfortable for the weight and CCF pads are cheap
    Baby steps can be a good thing.
    Also there is nothing wrong with backyard camping when trying gear out
    Sympathy as my beloved wife has MS with all the associated problems related to the bodies own thermostat and has a lot of trouble during changes in the weather but we went camping last year and she didn't die
     
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  3. Bridgetdaddy

    Bridgetdaddy Scout

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    Doesn't sound silly at all, sounds awesome!
    Noone learns all at once. Small steps are the way we all get good at anything. Trying and testing close to home gives you a safety net if something goes south. The biggest problemost people have is deciding to take the first step.
    Keep us posted and never be afraid to ask for advice.
     
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  4. Backyard

    Backyard Supporter Supporter

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    Acknowledging that there is something you can do to "stretch" your comfort level is something the vast majority of people actively refuse to do.

    Thinking about how to overcome this obstacle and then executing a plan, the few that stretch, often fail to do.

    What you described is a rare and beautiful thing. Well done!

    You go girl! And by girl, I mean bad @&& bush craft woman of great tolerance and disposition, kicking down walls and such.

    I really respect your hike along this path.
     
  5. 2stoves

    2stoves Scout Bushclass I

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    Just a thought but have you considered a hammock? I am also challenged with a bad back and knees that have seen better days. A few years back I was ready to give up my overnight camping because of the pain involved. Then I happened upon a hammock and now have no issues sleeping. Yes, my knees still give me fits but for those I have given up long hikes, set up a base camp and do shorter day hikes. When I am ready for bed instead of getting down on the ground, I sit down on my hammock, lift my feet, lay back in a pile of down, and drift off to sleep. Just a thought to consider.
     
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  6. Luafcm

    Luafcm Scout

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    Good way of breaking down the issue. You just want to be warm and comfortable.

    A tent pad and sleeping bag aren't comfortable in the summer. It's a lot of work, but you could try to make a bed instead. Stuffed garbage bag or something for a mattress would make for a comfy sleep. If you end up happy with the results and are comfortable with your ability to set up a bed anywhere, then you'll be able to toss and turn.

    You should watch "Cree Hunters of Mistassini" if you've never seen it. They build a hunting camp, but I thought it was cool how they setup the inside of the camp.
     
  7. Moquah

    Moquah Tinder Gatherer

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    Last edited: Dec 21, 2016
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  8. snapper

    snapper Scout

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    If you're willing to try being in a cabin, have you considered trying a "hot tent" set-up? I think that would be a nice blend of being in a tent yet still having a stove to warm you and cook on. Regardless of how you go about this, congratulations to you for your willingness to challenge yourself in this way. Too many people just retreat from the challenge without ever knowing whether they really need to or not.

    That's all for now. Take care and until next time...be well.

    snapper
     
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  9. Terasec

    Terasec Scout

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    if your car camping
    can make it quite comfortable
    as snapper stated a hot tent comes in various forms, and can use a stove or simpler buddy heater
    can also use a cot in such a tent, which may resolve your sleeping issue
    as for cold weather, you can also try shutting off your heat at home and see how you cope
     
  10. Haggis

    Haggis Supporter Supporter

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    image.jpeg Winter camping can start in the backyard,,, and by all means should! Easier to run the warm house if something didn't did what you thought it would do.

    Winter camping, in the north, is feet from a vehicle, a snowmobile, a sled, or a pulk,,, bring a cot if you like, bring enough stove, clothes, sleeping bag(s), and pads to keep you immune to the cold.

    I'm by no means a veteran or an expert at cold winter camping, but lots of camping in below freezing weather, and at least a few experiences in subzero weather have convinced me that the cold doesn't need be a problem. 3 or 4 stinky guys in a small tent, and nowhere to hide when one of them "breaks wind", that's a problem!
     
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  11. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Dawn Supporter

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    haha!!! I wholeheartedly agree with you there, and it's one of the biggest things I've been learning the last few years. I used to get stuck in the mindset of "all or nothing", and that always stopped me from even STARTING. Learning to break things down into small manageable steps have brought me so much farther - in many areas - than I've ever been able to previously :)

    Oh yeah- the "bad @&& bush craft woman of great tolerance and disposition, kicking down walls and such" ...
    who can't sleep without a small stuffed animal and fuzzy blanket ;) Thanks for the vote of confidence on being a STRONG woman :) I am trying to strike a good balance LOL!!
     
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  12. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Dawn Supporter

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    :eek::eek::eek: :46::46:
     
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  13. CuriousLearner

    CuriousLearner Nemophilist Supporter

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    When I was younger, my brother had some issues with cold sensitivity when we were camping. He found that the best fix for him was a good base layer, and taking a brisk walk before he crawled into his sleeping bag for the night. I don't know if that was mental, or getting his circulation going before going to bed actually somehow helped. I figured I would throw it out there.
     
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  14. DavidJAFO

    DavidJAFO Supporter Supporter

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    "Remember, no matter where you go, there you are"
    hello,
    GO Girl :) before going to bed I strip down & change out of everything I have been wearing from that same day. Those clothes will be full of body moisture, even if they feel warm & dry after a few hours sitting by the fire, they are not. A change of clothes tip if you are not in a tent & under a Basha (tarp), is to bring a small square of foam mat to sit on by the fire & use this also to stand on when changing your clothes. Place it on the ground near your sleep system so that you have a dry spot to undress & get your dry night kit on, keep it clean & the snow off. You step on snow in your dry socks, they become wet socks thus you have cold feet. Those humid clothes will draw body heat from you during the night. A Wee Scots trick.. if it's snowing out, a foot snow bath before you go to bed. Rub the white powder around both feet followed by give you feet a good towel dry, then pull on your bed socks & your feet will be as warm as toast the rest of the night. ;) I've tried & tested this theory many a time both Arctic Warfare CADRE Veteran & the snowfields of both Lowland & Highland Scotland. Coldest I've endured & slept outdoors was minus -33C - minus -34C.
    Regards
    David
     
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  15. Luafcm

    Luafcm Scout

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    Eating before bed helps big time, it's been discussed to death, but it's a big deal. Taking a leak, and eating, are the difference between me sleeping at night in the winter. They are the biggest concerns by far. Peanut m&m's always do the trick for me.
     
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  16. Luafcm

    Luafcm Scout

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    That's hardcore haha, I take baby powder (shhhh!)
     
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  17. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Dawn Supporter

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    Great suggestion 2stoves. I do have a hammock and a pair of good tree straps. I've only tried it twice, and I have mixed feelings about it, mostly regarding getting in and out of it. I intend to try it some more come spring, but also the more I read, the more I see that having a GOOD setup can be VERY expensive (underquilt, topquilt, etc.)
     
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  18. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Dawn Supporter

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    A tip well worth tossing, thanks :)
     
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  19. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Dawn Supporter

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    Snow foot bath- WOW! Would have NEVER thought of that one.. BRRR!! but I'll keep it in mind for sure ;) I carry a good CCF pad with me even in my daypack, so I'm happy to say I have that piece of advice covered. That little pad is one of the best multipurpose tools in my bag! :40:
     
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  20. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Dawn Supporter

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    A few pics from my recent living room test - I didn't have reason to post these before :rolleyes:
    31577644541_c97247a9c4_z.jpg
    30851359274_92aaf369b5_z.jpg
    31656176186_e309338ddd_z.jpg
    30851360644_e6683c9c5a_z.jpg
    ..and of course the cute kitty picture :p

    31577053602_420f41678e_z.jpg
     
  21. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Dawn Supporter

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    Interesting you mention that. I was thinking about "next steps" of learning cold weather sleeping.. our attic is unheated and REALLY COLD in winter.. that might be another experiment to do - a safe, sheltered spot, but a cold hard floor and air temp. I should check out the air temp up there - it's probably not quite as cold as outside, but pretty close to except for wind factor!
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2016
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  22. CuriousLearner

    CuriousLearner Nemophilist Supporter

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    When I camp I always make sure to have flat even ground, and then I use a sleeping pad, however I know that some people put down a thick layer of pine or leaves under their tent or tarp to insulate and cushion from the ground, maybe if you did both it could provide some back relief.

    P.S. - You can use your tree when your done make it pull double duty. :18:
     
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  23. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Dawn Supporter

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    LOL!!! and it would make my bed smell nice too! :D
     
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  24. Terasec

    Terasec Scout

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    personally i would use that cat as foot warmer :)
     
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  25. Crooked Penguin

    Crooked Penguin Supporter Supporter

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    Respect, I'm a bit of a wimp when it comes to cold weather camping myself. I've gone to just below freezing a few times just to test out my gear but I can't say I was enjoying it very much. And I even have a pretty decent tent.

    My bed was nice and warm though, thanks to a Thermarest Neo Air All Seasons (really, you could sleep on ice with those things and still don't feel the cold from below), except for my face that peeked out of my down bag. It starts hurting after a while!

    I would like to try sleeping in a lean-to with a long fire in winter time some day but I'll have to travel for that. Camping in the wild is illegal in most of Europe, and while I won't let that stop me having a huge fire wouldn't be the smartest thing to do if I don't want to be discovered.

    Good luck on your journey though, and thanks for sharing your experience!
     
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  26. Moondog55

    Moondog55 Guide

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    One baby step would be turning the house thermostat down, a degree a day until it is just taking the chill off and a jumper is needed in the house
    The next would be turning off the heat in a bedroom and sleeping with a window open
     
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  27. blind & lost

    blind & lost Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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  28. NJHeart2Heart

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    1. Thanks for the honest relating. Good to know I'm not the only coldweather "curr" :confused:

    2. I tried a Thermarest - they have a really good reputation for the cold-worthiness of their pads, but I am a pretty severe flip flopping side sleeper, and I basically slid/rolled right off that thing while cabin camping this year. Being physically sensitive and fidgety just make that issue drive me crazy, trying to fix it through the night!
    I just today exchanged at REI for my THIRD pad (thank goodness I'm a member and they have a generous return/exchange policy!). My second was a Big Agnes insulated Qcore (orange) regular, and the vertical baffles with larger ones on the outside was a definite improvement over the Thermarest, but I still had some moments I found myself nearly off my pad. Today I got the same but "wide regular", which gives me an extra 5 inches of width, and which I think is going to be the best I'm going to get with my crazy neediness :) I like to try for light as possible, but in this case, the extra few ounces will be worth actually being able to STAY on my pad and not FREEZE from conduction!

    3. I totally relate to the frozen face syndrome! I have the same problem, to a lesser degree even in my own comfy bed on cold nights! With forced hot air for heat in our house, and the vent being BEHIND the bureau in our bedroom the air temp tends to fluctuate through the night. I often use the blanket around my whole face with just a small "tunnel" from my mouth to the outside ;) In fact, even as I sit here in my cubicle, my nose is cold..
     
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  29. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Dawn Supporter

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    :18::18::dblthumb:
     
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  30. 2stoves

    2stoves Scout Bushclass I

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    It can be very expensive or not.

    If you are handy then doing DIY for TQ/UQ is pretty doable. Check it out Do-It-Yourself (DIY). Part of my issue is limited mobility which can make getting in/out of the hammock a real pain. I personally have Hennessy Hammock with the classic (you get in/out of the bottom instead of over the side). This takes care of my mobility issues but before I invested in Hennessy, I used a walking stick to assist me to get in and out.

    Also, buy your quilts from people that are upgrading. I purchased my first down top quilt here at a reasonable price and still use it today for a summer quilt. At hammockforums.net there is a For Sale area where you can get good deals on used equipment. Most of my gear comes from there.

    Another thought is if you are not hiking but instead doing base camps, there is nothing wrong with doing synthetic quilts which will save you a small fortune.

    But good cold weather gear is not cheap be it for hammocks or ground. In fact my hammock quilts are duel purpose and I use them when I am doing family camping and stuck on the ground.

    In any case, hope you find the answer to your question. If I can provide additional information, don't hesitate to ask
     
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  31. Lichen

    Lichen Supporter Supporter

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    Not many things worse than shivering all night in your sleeping bag. I now use a cot, a really thick pad and good sleeping bag. In the morning, you just hope that somebody else gets up before you to start the fire and the coffee. Plan on using 3x more firewood than you think you'll need.
     
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  32. Crooked Penguin

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    Ah yes, I am a tossing and turning side sleeper as well as it happens, I'm pretty short for a man but I got the large version just so I'd have a little more room to move around on.

    The trick is to find the right pressure for the inflatable pads. It needs be firm enough to keep you off the ground, but not so hard that it won't shape to the contours of your body any more. That way you create sort of a indent with your body weight which will help keeping you in place. You will need a fairly level ground for this to work though.

    But whatever works for you. I tried an Exped down matras (I think it was..) with those vertical baffles myself but preferred the Thermarest. Different strokes for different folks!

    Oh, and can't you saw a vent-sized hole in that desk perhaps? I'm sure it would help a lot :)
     
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  33. Seeker

    Seeker Woods Bum Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    I think your breakdown of the "task" is a good way to do it... similar to easing a child into full fledged "carrying your own weight" adult camping... when my daughter was little, I carried everything to ensure she enjoyed it: huge tarp, her own tent, books, dolls, doll clothes, pillow, lights, marshmallows, special food/snacks, etc. It sucked, but gradually, she picked up more and more of the load, literally, as well as camp tasks (like making a fire effectively, without me having to watch to make sure it didn't go out), and eventually I sort of threw her a bit harder into canoeing. I think we only did 2 or 3 trips in a tandem canoe before I made her do ALL of her own work on a 'graduation' trip in two solo canoes when she was 16. All I did that trip was cook for her (because she still today doesn't like to cook on an open fire.)

    So how did your "bed" on the floor work out? If a foam pad doesn't do it, consider one of the many good air mattress options... for winter camping, you'll probably want something with an R value (vs, say a NEO Air XL)... a self inflator might work, and winter affords better means of carriage (ie, a sled) vs schlepping it all on your back... so weight matters less.

    I have a bad L5/S1, and a hammock helps... but I also like my NEO Air...

    As far as being cold sensitive, I can only add that one of the reasons I live in the South is to avoid the severe winters of my home (Central NY)... I have been frostbitten to a minor degree in all my extremities, as all residents have, but I still went outside, and would if I still lived up there... as I've aged, my metabolism has slowed, and the 35* bag that once kept me warm at 27* no longer works even at 40*... I simply carry "extra" in the form of another quilt or woobie. I even keep a knit hat on my bedpost at home, because sometimes I get cold at night there... point is, you just have to take steps to mediate it... the damp cold we have down here seems at times to penetrate worse than the dry cold of other climates... it's funny to hear northern transplants complain about it... I have an old US Army ECW/Arctic parka, liner, pants, and liners for those, with the big furry hood, and sometimes that's not enough sitting in a deer blind... you'll figure it out too.
     
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  34. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Dawn Supporter

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    :p
     
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  35. Terasec

    Terasec Scout

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    in the end, theres only so much you can do
    cold weather camping will never be as comfy as your bed with thermostat on high
    i look forward to winter all year, hiking, camping, ice fishing, etc,
    yet when i am out in that cold, many times i say to myself, ^^%$#*, %#&*$, **^$^@, its FN cold, WTF am i doing?
    have spent many nights, freezing in my tent/shelter, glimpsing up praying for daylight to show itself, getting up every hour to do jumping jacks and restoke the fire,
    what makes it worth it? when that sun hits, and i have hot coffee in my hand, its a beautiful thing, makes the miserable night well worth it
     
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  36. NJHeart2Heart

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    Yep. Good point. I do know that, but I didn't really do that in my living room camp out since I just wanted to test it at regular inflation and see what happened with my back overnight. I did find that I was sore the next morning, so next time I will play with that too.
     
  37. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Dawn Supporter

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    True enough. My primary reason for even trying is to be prepared in an emergency situation and so that I can finish my bushclass overnights without dying ;):40:
     
  38. 8thsinner

    8thsinner Guide Bushclass I

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    You have an excellent attitude towards self growth, very admirable.
    I have known several that swear sleeping on the floor constantly can heal the back pain a little, depending on the extremity, but it must be done 7/7 days a week. and can take up to six weeks to adjust.
    It's something to look into if nothing else.

    I have spent repeated weeks in a fire-less homeless scenario and learned a few things from it.
    Here would be my tips for you.
    A cabin, is a very large space to heat and doesn't insulate you as closely, sleeping inside a bivi tent, even indoors will trap more warm air.
    An emergency blanket over that...even more heat but higher risk of condensation.
    Dry clean socks, to get into before bed works for me, but some sweatr either by no socks or dipping their feet in snow first. It's not a method I have tried. Well barefeet is okay sometimes. Don't fancy the snow approach myself though.
    A hot sigg with a neoprene sports bandage makes a very good hot water bottle that lasts a few hours.
    I now get into clean and dry sleeping clothes, merino long jons and base layer. if needed I would ocassionally wipe down with baby wipes first, it's briefly cold but then getting into clean dry clothes gives a stronger psychological boost I believe.
    Hot chocolate is always great before bedtime.
    I will often wear a heavy wool felted kinda of jacket, this winter anyway, it's a tartan design and made by FCUK, believe it or not it's really really good quality and the pocket space is pretty decent.
    Once I am in my bag, and bivi outer liner, I will wrap the jacket around my torso, it adds a nice cushion and quite a lot of warmth because of the tightness to it.
    I also use a summer reflector for car windows. That is my base matt and ground proofing...I was also carrying a beach straw matt, but I really don't think this is necessary.

    At this time of year, if it's been dry, I will seek out the underside of heavy pines and the like for dry leaves underneath, scoop these onto one of my emergency blankets and drag that to my tarp.
    I was out last week with this set up and was sweating in about two hours at 3-4 degrees.. It takes a balance.


    One thing I have not mastered is a pillow, I just can't seem to get it right yet, when I was homeless at one point I just took a cushion in with me. I usually try different clothes packed inside my sleeping bag cover with a soft cotton outer and fill it with different clothes.

    I hope some of this can help you, and wish you the best of luck in your journey.
    I hardly ever use matts, of any kind, I hate the look of them and I hate the space they take up.
    I sleep in a tarp (uk basha), domed on one side, triangularily tipped on the other.
    On the open side if it's cold, I will place either garbage bags over the domed door with my boots to hold them in place. I will do this in temperature over freezing.
    Under freezing temps, I use an emergency blanket as the door with a tea light in front of it, it takes less than ten minutes to warm the space.
    I sleep inside a 15 yr old goose down bag, a cheaper own brand, but I am thinking it's about time for an upgrade, probably a vango 350 down bag. I have lost over half my original fill I would guess but I am rarely cold with it, and I am skinny, I do get cold very easily.

    So to summarise

    Night time process
    Hot chocolate or soup
    Wash smoke and dirt of then get into dry clothes.

    My set up.
    Leaves, inside garbage if needed to keep it all together as matress
    Window reflector
    Beach straw mat (sometimes(not if in stealth mode))
    Down sleeping bag
    Bivi bag for protecting sleeping bag
    Jacket secured around bivi (this was a huge eureka moment)
    Domed tarp with emergency blanket doorway
    Snuggle hot water bottle, (hip placement is good)

    Tealight candle as heating

    I have tried small hot rocks without much success, I need to try larger ones for heating at some point.

    I am going out again on the 24th and I will be carrying a heavy wool blanket too, which adds incredible weight and warmth, (wearing/carrying it as a cloak) but only because I will have someone else with me and I want to make sure she doesn't freeze. I think it's highly unlikely with two of us in such a small space properly heated.

    The set up, will be open ground in a space surrounded by trees at around 50 feet, so it won't have much wind, and the opening will be facing the fire for about six hours first. That will dry and warm the leaves even more and I know unless it's down to minus twenty I am going to be toasty to warm with this set up.
    It sounds simple and it is but it's extremely effective.

    Things I still keep in mind for the cold but I haven't needed these thngs myself in a couple of years.

    Wrap a shemagh around each leg and wear under longjons or tights or what ever, Fishnets don't last long but take up far less space than long jons.
    Scarf around the midrift (dantien support)
    Buff over the head and neck
    Keep wearing gloves
    Pair of thin tight socks to wear over my sleeper socks (traps heat)(Often sweaty by morning)

    Here is my original post on the basha set up..
    Winter basha experiment
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2016
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  39. DavidJAFO

    DavidJAFO Supporter Supporter

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    "Remember, no matter where you go, there you are"
    hello NJHeart2Heart,
    Go on you know you really want to, then you can strike it off the Bushcraft to do bucket list. snow bath.. snow bath.. ROFLMAO :cool:
    Regards
    David
     
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  40. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Dawn Supporter

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    LOL!! <hug> David! I can count on you to brighten my moments!
     
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  41. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Dawn Supporter

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    Hiya CuriousLearner-
    Good tip. I do have 1 set of baselayers - sythetic right now, but I'm starting to get curious about merino wool combinations. There are benefits to each I suppose so it's something to do a bit more research about.. Watch out Youtube.. I have a new topic to research! ;)
     
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  42. teb_atoz

    teb_atoz Guide Bushclass I

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    The French mountaineers laugh at the Americans because we are scared of beint cold. As long as it does not lead to hypothermia cold is not a bad thing. Just like many things in life it is mental. Grab the ice cicles by the roof and have a good time.

    cheers
     
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  43. DavidJAFO

    DavidJAFO Supporter Supporter

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    "Remember, no matter where you go, there you are"
    hello NJHeart2Heart,
    Oh WOW a hug.. :cool: strike that off my Bushcraft to do bucket list. ;) LOL.
    Regards
    David
     
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  44. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Dawn Supporter

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    I am a frequent hugger in real life, so many of the great people here, male and female, will have been hugged by me by now :p It's one of my things :40:
     
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  45. DavidJAFO

    DavidJAFO Supporter Supporter

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    "Remember, no matter where you go, there you are"
    hello NJHeart2Heart,
    Awe.. bless you Dawn. :)
    Regards
    David
     
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  46. Lichen

    Lichen Supporter Supporter

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    No you know why I was happy to get rid of that pad. I kept sliding off it all night. I also wear a pair of Cabela's down booties to bed to keep my feet warm.
     
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  47. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Dawn Supporter

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    Warm booties sound toasty and comfy :) The living room experiment actually went well for temperature, but for most bushcrafters the difference between bedroom and living room is not a difference... for me.. a little temp change CAN feel very different... but yeah, the big test was back comfort. I did OK, but if I did wind up retreating to the bedroom early the next morning to catch some extra rest. Some was back pain, some was probably just a bit of tossing and turning since it was a sleeping bag and pad and not my own bed.. and yeah.. a bit of slipping and sliding too ;) Sooo.. definitely baby steps.. but.. just keep moving forward :40:
     
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  48. gohammergo

    gohammergo Supporter Supporter

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    Baby steps are still steps! All journeys start with steps. :)

    I feel for you, with the cold issues. I am a hot sleeper, and seldom get cold most any time. We heat with wood, and my wife is constantly chilled, even when it feels hot for me. I usually sleep with no covers, even when the temp gets down into the low 60's at night in the house. My wife says she gets so cold that it hurts her bones, so I kind of know what you are going through.

    I have no advice for you, just wanted to pass good vibes your way. Keep up the good work. One step at a time! :)
     
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  49. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Dawn Supporter

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    Aww thanks gohammergo :) Fortunately, though not as bad as me, my husband likes it warm too :D Cool...errrr.. warm sleeping bags help too! ;):p
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2016
  50. Fat Old Man

    Fat Old Man Supporter Supporter

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    Reflectix is your friend. Its a barrier to radiant heat, blocking up to 97%. Cut a piece to go under your mattress. It could also be slid in between your hammock and under quilt. You just want to have at least a 1" air gap between you and the Reflectix and don't cocoon yourself with it, as its a vapor barrier as well.
     

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