Bannock recipe

Discussion in 'Food' started by Pappy Frank, Apr 27, 2012.

  1. Pappy Frank

    Pappy Frank Supporter Supporter

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    I have been lurking and occasionally taking part in discussions here for some time. I have never heard of Bannock until I came to this forum, so I started looking into it and found out I have not only been using it for years, but about 30 years or so ago I came up with my own recipe for Bannock. Not just a little bit, but a rather large batch.

    I use this mix just as you would use Bisquick or any other biscuit mix. You can make anything from it including Bannock, Biscuits, Flapjacks, Brownies, Peanut Butter Brownies, Coffee Cake, and the list goes on and on.

    I make it and put it into gallon sized plastic bags. It lies flat in the freezer that way and will keep almost indefinitely. It doesn’t usually last quite that long at my house.

    I always wanted to write a cook book and thought I would call it “Fat Franks Favorite Fix’ns” with that in mind, I called this “Fat Franks Flapjack Mix”. A friend of mine added the word “Fabulous” to it and he died a short time later, so in honor to him (not me) I changed the name to “Fat Franks Fabulous Flapjack Mix”. I’m still working on the cook book.

    Here is my Large and Small Batch recipes:

    Large Batch of Mix,
    You will need the following ingredients:

    5 lbs Unbleached flour
    2 ½ Cups Dry Milk
    ¾ Cup Baking Powder
    1 Tablespoons Salt (optional)
    3 ¾ Cups Butter Flavor shortening

    Small Batch of Mix
    You will need the following ingredients:

    8 Cups Unbleached Flour
    1 Cup Dry Milk
    ¼ Cup plus 1 Tablespoon Baking Powder
    1 Teaspoons Salt (optional)
    1 ½ Cups Butter Flavor Shortening

    Mixing instructions are easy, mix all dry ingredients together and blend well. Cut in the Shortening until the mixture resembles corn meal.

    For Biscuits add about 1/3 cup liquid (water, milk, fruit juice etc.) to every cup of mix, shape it and bake it. Try adding cooked and crumbled bacon, or what ever meat you have available.

    For Flapjacks (pancakes for those who don’t know) add about ½ cup of liquid and a little sugar to each cup of the mix. I love making them with fruit juice and add the same fruit or a complimentary fruit to the mix.

    For Bannock, make the biscuit recipe and put whatever you want into it.

    Hope you enjoy it as much as I have.

    Now I’m hungry, I think I will go eat. :21:
     
  2. kyhunt

    kyhunt Scout

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    So is bannock just a type of bread? If so what makes it diiferent from bread? I never heard of bannock?
     
  3. Awasos

    Awasos Scout

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    Yum yum. I have not tried the butter flavor shortning. great idea!
     
  4. Prof

    Prof Guide Bushclass II

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    I guess great minds must work alike. I call my version The Professor's Log Cabin Baking Mix.

    The proportions are a bit different, but I, too, start with a 5-lb bag of flour.

    I have a recipe booklet that I would be happy to share with you in return for a copy of yours. I love biscuits and biscuit mixes!
     
  5. Prof

    Prof Guide Bushclass II

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    My dictionary says that bannock is "a kind of oatmeal or barley cake baked on a griddle." In common bushcraft terms, it is any type of camp-baked flatbreads.

    Baking bannock is fun, and is one of the skills of the Basic Bushclass. IA Woodsman has a nice video lesson on ways to bake it at camp.

    Regular bread gets smashed in a pack. Bannock is a made-on-the-spot bread that you can have fresh anytime. It's often just biscuit mix, but guys here add lots of other tasty ingredients.

    While there may be dozens of variations, woodsmen all seem to agree that bannock is tops; and that making it along the trail, with maybe some bacon or coffee turns a plain hike in the woods into a bushcraft outing!
     
  6. Pappy Frank

    Pappy Frank Supporter Supporter

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    Bannock is a type of biscuit, with additions in the dough. I suggest you look at some other thread about it. I also suggest yo look at the Bushclass Bannock Cooking video. They will both help.
     
  7. Pappy Frank

    Pappy Frank Supporter Supporter

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    It does add a flavor that is delicious. I do not always use it, but most of the time. Also you can use Lard which gives it a unique flavor also.
     
  8. Pappy Frank

    Pappy Frank Supporter Supporter

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    I will send you a PM in a few minutes. I would love to trade not only you but anyone that has similar.
     
  9. Pappy Frank

    Pappy Frank Supporter Supporter

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    Professor, you can add a little oatmeal to the biscuit recipe and that too is delicious. That is not in my booklet of recipes, but I have done it often.
     
  10. hillbilly75

    hillbilly75 Tracker

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    did you know bannock is originally from Scotland, the natives never made it before the scot trappers showed up. the original recipe is
    2 cups flour
    2 table spoons baking powder
    1 table spoon lard

    i add seasoning salt to taste

    mix dry ingredients then work in lard

    this is the one i use it will not go bad or rancid.
    then when your out in the bush add what ever you want and water, if cooking on stick dont make to wet or it will fall off.
    cook it on a rock or on a stick or in frying pan
     
  11. stienthor

    stienthor Tracker

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    I love bannock talk. been making the stuff for yrs. and during lean times it becomes my defacto bread eaten even when not in the bush.

    One thing I have always noticed is the shortening or lard . Now when I make it at home I use it on occasion, but for a dry mix carried with me into the bush and still most often even when cooked at home I do not use it at all.

    My personal recipe is as follows
    3C flour
    1tsp baking powder (I find this is not actually needed but does something for the bread)
    1 tblsp of powdered milk
    3 tblsp of brown sugar ( i like the bread on sweet side but still not over powered)
    As usual any berry nut or what ever can be used also

    A side note. I have made a decently edible if not bland flat bread out of nothing but flour. works well and still fills the stomach

    I would like to ask though how many guys work with there bannock where superstition is involved. My Grand dad and mother will not let a knife near such a bread. saying it just not right . its a bread meant for the hands to tear and passed to the next person.
    Just wondering, cause although i am not superstitious to me it like a tradition that i still do and make sure my kids participate in

    Like I said for what ever the reason always like the Bannock talk. thought I would chime in with my two cents
     
  12. darodalaf

    darodalaf Guide

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    Bannock is what were once called 'cakes' in English before the pastry connotation came about, that is, simple flat breads usually cooked over a fire either on a griddle or by direct heat. Remember King Alfred's 'burnt cakes'? Yep, the King of England made bannock by the fire :)
     
  13. Pappy Frank

    Pappy Frank Supporter Supporter

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    the idea of using a knife to cut bread is actually a rather new idea. It used to always be broken off and eaten. I am not sure if it matters as long as you get it into your stomach
     
  14. Pappy Frank

    Pappy Frank Supporter Supporter

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    the name Bannock goes back to Scotland, the bread has been around for thousands of years. Although the use of baking powder is recent. Prior to that they used either a Sourdough type bread for their flatbread, or they just used non leavened bread. I suppose one could argue a difference, but it was made and cooked either on a stick or rock as you mention.
     
  15. Pappy Frank

    Pappy Frank Supporter Supporter

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    The earliest mention of what could be understood as Bannock would be in the Bible where both leavened and unleavened bread is mentioned. The making of bread has been a daily routine in most if not all cultures for thousands of years. I love bread and would eat Bannock every meal if it were as easy to get as loaf bread.
     
  16. hillbilly75

    hillbilly75 Tracker

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    all the lard does is make it fluffier, thats all. and using a knife, i dont think i ever used one on bannock and i have been eating it since i can remember, and i didn't ever see dad use a knife either. just wouldn't seem right lol
     
  17. kyhunt

    kyhunt Scout

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    WOW. Thanks. I'll have to read that thread in Buschcraft. So much to read. Seems like I'm reading something everynight on here that makes me think, "why hadnt I ever thought of that." I love this place.
     
  18. Subdood

    Subdood Ex-bubblehead Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    Experiment

    Was reading through this discussion on Bannock and got hungry so I did an experiment in my kitchen at home to see if I could concoct something good from simple easy things I could actually carry on an outing.

    I put together 2C water, 2 chicken bullion cubes, and one 10 oz. can of chicken and brought them to a boil. Mixed 1C of a biscuit mix (quick substitute for home made bannock) with some tarragon, sage, marjoram and oregano (very small and light to carry all of them) with a bit of water to make a sticky dough for dumplings. Dropped the dumplings in at the boil, reduced to a simmer and covered (all possible on my small homemade alcohol stove, esbit stove, canteen cup stove or fire and canteen cup) for about 5 minutes.

    I was pleasantly surprised at the result. The dumplings were actually pretty good. Would recommend the low or no sodium bullion as the standard stuff can be pretty salty.

    Still new to this forum and haven't had much opportunity to get out this spring yet. Work schedule, family commitments but looking forward to some outings soon. Enjoy!
     
  19. Pappy Frank

    Pappy Frank Supporter Supporter

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    I love dumplings and your recipe for the stew sounds good. Had you thought about dehydrated chicken, it would carry well, and last a long time in the bush?
     
  20. carnivore

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    Ray Mears says it's meant to be broken and bad luck to cut it. That said, I slice mine in wedges.

    [​IMG]

    I just made and posted it for the BushclassUSA lesson yesterday. Here's my recipe:

    3 cups white baking flour
    4 tsp. baking powder
    2 tbsp. sugar
    1 tsp. salt
    2 beaten eggs
    1/2 cup of raisins
    milk as needed to reach a workable consistency

    If I were doing it in the field I would put powdered milk and dehydrated eggs in the mix, then add water.
     
  21. Subdood

    Subdood Ex-bubblehead Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    I hadn't thought of that Pappy Frank! Thanks for the tip, certainly lighter than cans of chicken.
     
  22. Pappy Frank

    Pappy Frank Supporter Supporter

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    We have an outing planned for the weekend of June 10, I am going to try your recipe then. Thanks again.
     
  23. MarcoMontana

    MarcoMontana Scout

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    I printed out your recipe Pappy, I have been eager to start practicing cooking Bush Food so to speak. I can't wait, question; with the biscuits you didn't specify if I needed to cover the pot/pan to bake creating more convection heat? Or if just placing in a pan and frying?
     
  24. Pappy Frank

    Pappy Frank Supporter Supporter

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    Sorry I have taken so long getting back to you, but I have been on an outing for a few days.

    I bake them in a Dutch Oven when I can. If you are using a reflector Oven I would leave them uncovered. You can also fry the biscuit dough in a frying pan.

    One way I really like to cook it is to get a stick about 1 to 1 1/2 inch in diameter peal the bark off the end and wrap the dough onto the stick and just hold it over the fire like you were roasting hotdogs. Keep an eye on it and when it begins to brown, enjoy it. You will begin to notice that different woods add a different flavor to the dough. You will find your favorite wood eventually, but in the mean time when you get the bark off the wood, taste the wood to see how it tastes some woods are quite bitter and others much better. As a rule of thumb a fruit bearing tree is better in my opinion.
     
  25. Bush Bear

    Bush Bear Scout

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    Just wanted to say thank you I just used this recipe for my bushclass on bannock. Of course I had to fiddle a bit. I used coconut oil instead of shortening, and for my liquid I used cranberry juice. We have a Black Cherry tree out back that is covered in fruit so I threw some of those in as well. Covered with a little butter and sugar.

    I definitely got the families seal of approval. When I went out to check the fire there was half left, and when I got back there was only a couple of pinches

    [​IMG]
    DSCN1206 by Bush Bear, on Flickr
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2012
  26. Pappy Frank

    Pappy Frank Supporter Supporter

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    You can use oil instead of shortening, just wait until you mix it to add the oil.

    The pic of you critic taking the final crumbs is great too. The look on her face is worth a million.

    Adding things to the recipe is what makes it. The last batch I made a few days ago on an outing with my wife had crumbled bacon, raisins, oatmeal, cornmeal, and a little brown sugar. Loved it, so did my wife.

    Thanks for the feedback.

    God Bless
    Pappy Frank
     
  27. Zig

    Zig Guide

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    I use different proportions in mine, often leaving out the dry milk and adding sugar, but either way you end up with a great camp bread. I really wish yeast leavened bread were a feasible option for camp, but chemically leavened bread like bannock is the next best thing!

    My favorite recipe includes my basic mix, plus diced pepperoni and cheddar cheese. Sometimes I'll add almonds or dried fruit. I would add bacon, but it never lasts long enough to be crumbled up!
     
  28. Pappy Frank

    Pappy Frank Supporter Supporter

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    Have you tried sour dough, it is great for the backpack kitchen.

    The old prospector (nicknamed sour dough) used to mix enough flour into it to make it stiff and then put it in his flour sack. When he settled for the night he added water and let it set overnight for breakfast. Great way to carry it on the trail.

    A little off topic, but it is bread.
     
  29. Zig

    Zig Guide

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    I've never tried making sour dough before. I didn't know that's how it was made! I'll definitely be trying this at some point.
     
  30. GMScooter

    GMScooter Guide

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    The one big question I have is when using powdered milk how much to use in a batch using 2 or 3 cups of flour?
     
  31. Pappy Frank

    Pappy Frank Supporter Supporter

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    It works out to 1/8 cup powder milk per cup of flour, so if making 2 cups flour add 1/4 cup powder milk, if making 3 cups flour add 3/8 cup powder milk.

    I have been known to add a little extra powder milk, it is a good source of protein. You can get to much I suppose, but I really do not know how to gauge that.
     
  32. GMScooter

    GMScooter Guide

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    Great info Pappy! I'll try that next time. Yesterday I made my first batch in the kitchen just to try it out.

    2 cups flour
    2 tbls baking powder
    1/2 cup raisins
    3 tbls brown sugar
    1 cup milk

    It turned out pretty good.
     
  33. Pappy Frank

    Pappy Frank Supporter Supporter

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    Can't go wrong with raisins and brown sugar. Just reading makes me hungry.
     
  34. meyekel

    meyekel Scout

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    Thanks for the recipe Pappy! I made some this weekend while camping with the family and it was a big hit! Just added a little olive oil to the recipe and it was GTG.
     
  35. Pappy Frank

    Pappy Frank Supporter Supporter

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    Glad I could help. It has been a big hit around our house for over 30 years
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2012
  36. southernbayou

    southernbayou Scout Bushclass I

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    I'm camping right now and ate some chicken and bannock dumplings inspired by this thread, and couldnt wait to post my feedback. Wow, just wow. Can't get over how delicious it was...and easy! I will be making this at home! Here is the recipe variation I used...

    Dumplings:
    2 cups All Purpose Flour
    4 tbsp powdered milk
    2 tbsp baking powder
    1 tbsp lard :)
    salt

    Mixed the dry ingredients, then split in half. Worked in lard to one of the halves, added water, mixed, and rolled dough into 1/2" balls - flattened. I then used 2/3 of this for a single generous portion.

    Brought water to boil (3/4 of a GI canteen cup)
    Added two chicken boullion cubes, can of chicken breast, and the dumplings. Boiled / simmered for five or six minutes. Added salt and pepper.

    Here's a pic. It's not pretty but it's damn tasty. In all fairness, I'm a big fan of chicken and dumplings, so i am bias, but this was about as good as any I've had. Next time I'm going to try the spices you listed...probably tomorrow night at the house. Haha. Thanks guys!

    [​IMG]


     
  37. MtnManJoe

    MtnManJoe Guide

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    OK - So, What am I missing?
    It seems that just about every 'recipe' I see includes milk (liquid or powdered). Is that really necessary?
    Seems like flour, baking powder, a bit of salt, and some oil/butter/lard/whatever (plus whatever yummies you want to add - berries, fruit nuts.etc) 'should' make for some good bannock/biscuits/bread-stuff??
     
  38. Adler

    Adler Tracker

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    I have an outting in a few weeks and has anyone tried to pre package this and vacum seal for any legnth of time? Can it have a shelf life of say 6 months?

    Thanks
     
  39. Prof

    Prof Guide Bushclass II

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    I would say the milk is not a necessity, but it just makes a little richer bread. I left out the milk and the shortening, too, and it was still pretty good. I'd say make up some small batches with a half cup of flour and try leaving out different ingredients to see what effect it has.

    Small plastic jars from peanut butter ot Nutella are a good way to store and carry bannock mix. Damp air can spoil the action of your baking powder, so any way to seal that out would be good. At home, I divide my mix into pint jars and keep it in the cupboard. It is then ready to make biscuits, pancakes, muffins or dumplings at a minute's notice.
     
  40. dailyselfreliance

    dailyselfreliance Scout

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    I don't use the milk or eggs in mine.
     
  41. Pappy Frank

    Pappy Frank Supporter Supporter

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    As far as I can tell, the milk just adds protein and flavor. It can be made without the milk, I have done it. I think it tastes better with milk.
     
  42. Pappy Frank

    Pappy Frank Supporter Supporter

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    I have never used a vacuum packaging for it, but it keeps well just in a container. I often use quart sized plastic bags. If you need a little, use a little, if you need a lot just open as many as you need. Carry as many plastic bags as you suspect you need. It will keep for a month or more without refrigeration. I have made it up and kept it in the freezer for much longer.

    By using quart sized bags if you bust a bag you do not loose all your mix.
     
  43. Ned

    Ned Scout

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    Another addition I like is sugar. My base recipe is simply a cup of flour, a teaspoon of baking powder, a quarter teaspoon salt, and a cup of water. Then I add to that the "extras", which could typically be a tablespoon of sugar, milk powder, and/or butter/lard.
     
  44. Deererainman

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    Made my first attempt at bannock this weekend with the Scouts. It turned out pretty good according to the scouts, just not enough. (3 cups self rising flour, 2 tspns baking powder, 1/2 cup brown sugar, 1/4 cup bacon bits) Cooked the first batch on a ceramic tile we found next to a fire with foil reflector. Took 30 minutes to cook. Second batch was on a stick. Cooked in 15 minutes.

    Both batches went very quick.
     
  45. Edge308

    Edge308 Tracker

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    Bannock

    I've been looking at recipes for bannock for the bushcrafter class. My question is, I see everyone packing it pre-made in a zip lock Baggie then cooking when ready. I've read a few different opinions. Do you mix everything at home and pack it out or hold off on the water until ready to cook? This is my first time so any help would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.
     
  46. Griffith

    Griffith Guide Vendor Bushclass I

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    Alot of the one's that I've seen are dry mixes from home (some with oil, but no egg). The only moisture I recall is when they are ready to cook and add water.
     
  47. Shnick

    Shnick Bushwhacker Bushclass II

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  48. Pappy Frank

    Pappy Frank Supporter Supporter

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  49. Edge308

    Edge308 Tracker

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    Thanks tha helps allot
     
  50. Scroggins

    Scroggins Banned Member Banned

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    I bag my dry mix so I don't have to do any prep when I'm in camp. Add the water/oil, mix it in the bag I packed my dry ingredients in and it's ready to go. Easy as pie! For recipes, if you have a while - check YouTube, lots of bannock videos there with tons of ingredient ideas, some I certainly never thought about, anyway.

    I like a little less sugar in mine and a bit more salt. Sometimes I'll add some diced jalapenos, cheddar cheese and diced green onions, and bacon bits. I do the same to biscuits and I love them, so do many others! Add more cheese, jalapeno, or bacon as you prefer.
     

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