Boiled Potatoes

Discussion in 'Food' started by Prof, Apr 15, 2012.

  1. Prof

    Prof Guide Bushclass II

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    I know there's nothing new or exciting about boiled potatoes, but they may be about the perfect camp food.

    They are easy to transport, just scrub them at home and throw them in a haversack. There's nothing to pack out, eat skin and all. They weigh a little more on the way in, but zero on the way out, so weight averaging is favorable.

    Nessmuk mentioned putting the potato kettle on for breakfast, but boiling them for lunch or dinner is a great addition to steak-on-a-stick or bacon. They are easy to cook right: as long as they are covered with water, they won't burn!

    They cook equally well over a fire or on a stove. Just a couple ounces of alcohol will boil a potato to perfection. Cut it smaller to speed cooking time.

    Serve with any meat for a great meal. Add a little salt or sprinkle on powdered butter for added flavor.

    Clean-up is a snap: Your canteen cup or pan is not messed up much; wipe out with a paper towel and you're good to go.

    Carry a package of instant gravy mix. Heat in a little water and pour over the potatoes!

    Boil the potatoes until about half done, then finish frying them in a little bacon grease.

    Mix in a small container of cheese spread and have cheesy potatoes.
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2012
  2. KYLongknife

    KYLongknife Scout

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    If Dan Quale had spelled it T-A-T-E-R, he might have been President.
     
  3. 95bv5

    95bv5 Scout

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    When I was an Assistant Scout Master we made sure to bring an extra bag of potato's for the kids that didn't pack enough food for campouts. Lots of ways to fancy up a tater.
     
  4. sdjsdj

    sdjsdj Guide Bushclass I

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    I like fried as well as boiled. No need to "deep fry them in 5 gallons of fat", just keep flipping em over. Slice em thin, put some olive oil in a pan, add some garlic pepper, dehydrated onion and maybe some small bell peppers. Forget the salt and butter. Eat them seasonings and they taste fantastic.
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2012
  5. WoodsJack

    WoodsJack Guide

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    Whoa. That's possible?
     
  6. freebirdfb

    freebirdfb Supporter Supporter

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    There are a lot of uses for potatoes. If you can make make room for a hand held grater with large holes, potatoes can be shredded for fried taters while bacon is frying in the pan.
     
  7. Pappy Frank

    Pappy Frank Supporter Supporter

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    Try packing them in mud (3/4 to 1 in thick) place them in hot coals 45 min should do it. Break off the mud, rinse them in hot water and enjoy.
     
  8. brush_loper

    brush_loper Froze to a Tree

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    We did taters in the coals this weekend wrapped in foil! Kids luv em this way...can't get them to touch them at the dining room table though.
     
  9. Kinggoat

    Kinggoat Scout

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    I have to say this thread is making me hungry. MMMMM, taters.....
     
  10. zippydapanhead

    zippydapanhead Tracker

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    Tates Not Trouts

    I recall Thoreau wrote about fish looking pretty in the pond and the pan, but tates looked better in the pan than in the ground... so why not look at the fish in the pond and look at the tates on the plate. Stick a couple in your pocket and head out to eyeball the fishies. :32: Ummm, pan fried taters...
     
  11. RangerXanatos

    RangerXanatos Scout

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    I like to slice them long ways and boil them with a beef boulioun cube. Adds a nice flavor.
     
  12. Prof

    Prof Guide Bushclass II

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    That's a good idea, and it's so simple. I'm going to add some of those cubes to my kit.
     
  13. karlhungusjr

    karlhungusjr Scout

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    My plan for my next trip is to take just potatoes, boiler onions, a head of garlic, bacon, flour, beef jerky, biscuit mix, and some seasonings. Might add a lemon just incase I decide to cook a fish if I catch one.
     
  14. 8thsinner

    8thsinner Guide Bushclass I

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    Potato skins are actually toxic, according to studies though it is indeterminate how much you need to eat before you get sick but can cause headaches and diarrhea for example. To avoid this they need to be cooked for a minimum of 20 minutes.
    Under no circumstances should you cook green ones though...

    Coming from the Irish side of things, potato bread is awesome, and there was a topic about that about three months ago but I no longer have the thread in my history, maybe someone else can look for it...
     
  15. Prof

    Prof Guide Bushclass II

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    Along those lines, I recently read about mixing bannock right in the flour sack:

    Open your flour sack and scoop a little depression in the flour. Add a "five-finger pinch" of sugar, a "four-finger pinch" of baking powder, and a "three-finger pinch" of salt. Add 1/3 cup of water (more or less: we didn't measure anything else!) and stir. Lift out the flour that was wetted by the water and knead briefly on a tent flap. Fry in bacon grease.

    That way you don't need to carry a separate biscuit mix. I want to try this soon, of course with some boiled potatoes. I have a cloth flour sack for the "authentic" feel. An old friend of ours said that her mother always mixed biscuit dough this way and did not use a mixing bowl! Carve a little paddle of wood, and you don't need a spoon.

    This has to be included in one of my next bushclass outings. I'd like to see any photos of your trip; and I'll try to take some, too!
     
  16. Juice

    Juice Scout

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    Great post. Potatoes are one of the healthiest foods on earth. And very packable. Plus they taste good no matter how you cook one.
     
  17. PMSteve

    PMSteve Old Time Outdoorsman Supporter

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    I usually "bake" a couple in the microwave until they're about half way "done" (3 - 4 minutes each). They still pack well, and slicing them or cut into cubes, they cook up in a fry pan with some bacon and sliced onions much faster. :32:

    I like to sprinkle a bit of garlic salt and pepper on mine.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2012
  18. karlhungusjr

    karlhungusjr Scout

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    Well the biscuit mix is my back up. I'm going to attempt to make more of a soda bread type biscuit with the flour, powdered butter milk, and baking soda. That way if it fails ill still have a way to make biscuits for biscuits and gravy.

    I will attempt to take some pics when I go. I'd also like to see yours when you get them taken. Its looken to be a fun summer!
     
  19. OregonDave

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    A baked murphy makes for foine fare, as does a baked sweet potatoe (aka yam).

    If all you've ever had is candied sweet potatoes with marshmallows and stuff at Thanksgiving or Christmas, try baking them like a potatoe and add some butter, salt and pepper.
    :36:
    OD
     
  20. cloudraker

    cloudraker Guide

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    After the potatoe caught on in the old world, peasants and common folk would carry hot boiled potatoes in thier coat pockets as hand warmers.
     
  21. Longbeard

    Longbeard on the PCT Bushclass III

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    Good thread Prof. Mine are tasty 'cause I grow my own in my good Iowa dirt out back. I prefer to wrap in foil and bake in the coals, low maintenance.
     
  22. wildbill50

    wildbill50 Tracker

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    My mother, who is 85, said that when she was a young girl she would spend the night with a friend. Before they went to bed the friend's father would give each of them a sweet potato. They would bury it in the ashes of the fireplace and that would be their breakfast the next morning.
     
  23. Hiwa

    Hiwa Guide

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    My old standyby for a week trip was 5 lbs. Each of bacon , potatoes and onions. Not for backpacking though !
     
  24. zippydapanhead

    zippydapanhead Tracker

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    Imagine An Irish Brogue...

    "Top o' the morn'n, O'Murphy. Are ye' hands cold, or are ye' just happy to see me?" :19:
     
  25. anubis1335

    anubis1335 Bushmaster

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    Thats my fave way to eat sweet taters. Reminds me of sunday dinners at granny and pa's
     
  26. Looker

    Looker Guide

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    Dave, my family really likes baked sweet potatoes! I don't know why people insist on burying them in marshmallows and junk, they taste great on their own. Sweet potato fries are really good too.

    Prof, have you ever tried just sprinkling some instant brown gravy directly on the potatoes as seasoning? I haven't either, but the idea to try it just hit me as I was reading your original post.

    Looker
     
  27. rdec

    rdec Guide

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    The very first meal I prepared in the woods was boiled potatoes. I was about 8, attending a boy's camp in Maine. We gathered the wood, made a pot hanger, built a fire (another first) cut up the potatoes into chunks and boiled them in a #10 can pot with a wire bail. All of this under the supervision of the counselors. A little butter, salt and pepper and they tasted pretty good, although mine were a bit underdone. I learned a lot from that exercise.
     
  28. PropThePolecat

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    I eat potatoes all the time. Both at home and in the woods.

    A simple lebanese dish goes as follows. I peel the skin, mash them roughly onto a plate and mix with garlic, throw some olive-oil on top, add salt and pepper and eat with bread.

    Yep, i do this too. I add a onion sliced in small pieces and add some salt/pepper too. Great meal!
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2012
  29. Big_Bush

    Big_Bush Banned Member Banned

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    I love the baby reds with garlic, salt, pepper, butter and olive oil. So. Damn. Good. :38:

    Potatoes - YouTube
     
  30. 8thsinner

    8thsinner Guide Bushclass I

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    You have sorta inspired me towards an experiment on this since reading the replies...
    I have been using baby taters a lot recently to make Mexican wedges. I find them a good size for fast cooking, just coat in oil then coat with fajita seasonings...wonder if this can be done in a foil oven...serve with a chili, cream cheese, turmeric, paprika, salt, pepper and garlic... sauce with real cheese melted in lightly...

    Thought I would share the idea if anyone is out before me, which I find likely right now, I wont be out for a few weeks.
     
  31. Redhound80

    Redhound80 Scout Bushclass I

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    I grew up pretty poor and one meal me and my buddies could always come up with for our camping trips was a very simple potato soup. It was not what most would consider a very good potato soup, by "real" cooking standards, but we "tore it up" and was glad to have it!

    Gordy
     
  32. Ahnkochee

    Ahnkochee Bushmaster

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    I like to break up my potatoes with a fork then mix in canned corned beef and beaten eggs, salt & pepper the form into patties and fry them up. As an option if I have panko bread crumbs handy I'll roll the patties in the crumbs before frying for a crispier exterior.

    When I lived in Nerima, Japan we'd stop into Yokohama on our way up from Yokosuka to see the street vendors to buy Ishiyaki Imo which translates rock roasted potatoes. These were Satsuma Sweet Potatoes (the best on Earth) which were roasted buried under a bed of hot smooth river pebbles. I'll always remember some of the potatoes had these small pebbles still stuck to the skin, delicious steamy hot. Yokohama also noted for their Shumai steamed pork dumplings. Delicious meal on the cheap from the street vendors of Yokohama. Great memories from my youth. :)
     
  33. MiddleWolf

    MiddleWolf Guide

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    In a pinch or not, the instant potatoes are not that bad either. Lots of times we just make them for dinner and add garlic and butter. Over the fire and hiking they make quick work for a filling meal provided that water is no issue. Regular potatoes are an excellent campfire food and a little foil to wrap them and place by the coals is great.
     
  34. Daywalker

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    Tater's, and if I have it MEAT are my favorite som'thin to eat. Peace
     
  35. anubis1335

    anubis1335 Bushmaster

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    It can be done in the oven. We wash the taters, then rub on copious amounts of butter, sprinkle w garlic salt, wrap in foil and bake as usual. After thet are cooked we dress em out w ranch, bacon, cheddar and chopped green onions. Where the taters sits, the skin becomes crispy and we just LOVE that.
     
  36. sdjsdj

    sdjsdj Guide Bushclass I

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    Just finished lunch here at work, using a boiled baby red.
    1) Dice into small pieces uisng an Opinel No. 8.
    2) Nuke it for 2 1/2 minutes in water.
    3) Put it in my pot cozy for 45 mins.
    4) Drain water
    5) Add 3 oz chopped up sharp cheddar cheeese, horseradish powder, small squirt of olive oil, some popcorn butter flavor (no sodium variety), a dash of Mrs. Dash's Chipotle seasoning (no salt).
    6) Shake it around for a bit with the lid on the tupperware container. (to mix everything up)
    7) Eat with Light My Fire Spork
    8) Don't even try to explain to my office co-workers why I do this
    9) In case any of you are wondering, I do this, because, it's cheap, fun, and healthy.
    10) Put the money I save into a jar for future bushcraft purchases.
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2012
  37. karlhungusjr

    karlhungusjr Scout

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    Here you go professor.


    Ingredients just pot in the "pot"
    [​IMG]

    almost finished
    [​IMG]

    cleaned my plate
    [​IMG]


    Ingredients were baby potatoes, boiler onions, dried corn, a piece of dried garlic, jerky, and a sun dried tomato. I didn't bother with any seasonings beyond what was used to make the jerky.

    Cooking time was maybe 25 minutes ish. I just filled my trangia to capacity and cooked until it went out. It tasted great to me and I was very pleased with the results.


    Unfortunately I didn't get to try to make biscuits/bannock and gravy since the place didn't allow open fires, so my little foil oven will have to get tested another day.
     
  38. John, the baptist

    John, the baptist Guest

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    Cause the fish has something the potato doesn't. Protein. And also fat. Both neccesary ingredients to a healthy diet...and I'll take a wild trout over a store bought anything anyday of the week and twice on (oh you thought I was going to say Sunday didn't you :p) any other day of the week...
     

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