Camping & Woodcraft vs Woodcraft & Camping...

Discussion in 'General Bushcraft Discussion' started by usnvet9397, May 4, 2012.

  1. usnvet9397

    usnvet9397 Tracker

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    I've been able to download G.W Sears Woodcraft & Camping onto my Kindle fire, but not Horace Kephart's camping and Woodcraft...

    For those who may have read both...is there a difference?

    I've downloaded also John Mead Gould's How to Camp Out...is it worth the read?
     
  2. Mrwhitetailfanatic

    Mrwhitetailfanatic Banned Member Banned

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    I couldnt figure out for the longest time why the same book was written by two different people. I have read Sears version Im going to get Kepharts when I finish the book I'm on now.
     
  3. Scott Allen

    Scott Allen Guide

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    I think Kephart goes into more detail and "how to" than does Nessmuk, but both are good reads. I'm reading Bradford Angier's "The Master Backwoodsman" right now and it is pretty good, but a little sketchy on details at times. My all time favorite is "Wildwood Wisdom" by Ellsworth Jaeger.

    Scott
     
  4. madmax

    madmax Bushmaster

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    I like Kephart's book, but that may just be a bias based on I bum around the same woods he did.
     
  5. Hawkcreek

    Hawkcreek Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    For me Nessmuk read like I was listening to someone tell stories, Kephart read more like a how to manual. I gained knowledge from both so I'd recommend both however.
     
  6. rdec

    rdec Guide

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    If you want LOTS of detail try Woodcraft & Camping by Bernard S. Mason. I found it the library as a boy, got my own copy as a Christmas present when I was a young scout. Gave away that hardcover copy in a misplaced spirit of generousity during a move and got a paperback edition that I will keep, thank you.

    Anyone interested in bushcraft should have Nessmuk, Kephart, Mason and Jaeger as true classics. Another good one is Cache Lake Country by John Rowlands.

    For beginning to end reading of essays on the outdoors rather than how-to-do-it read Sigurd Olsen and for great novels about the life and times of early man read Jean Auel. (The details about artifacts and how they were used are accurate as far as is known, the actions/reactions of individuals are intelligent surmise but, obviously, one young cro-magnon couple did not invent everything from taming horses to the atlatl in one generation. Auel uses the device of time-compression and narrative to personalize what would be a dry recital of anthropology. The books are good reads.
     
  7. Skab

    Skab Staff Staff Member Super Moderator Vendor Bushclass I Bushclass Instructor

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    To me, other then the title the two books have nothing in common really. Kephart's is a much more in depth book. Hell the Kephart book is darn near 2 inches thick. Sear's is barely a 1/2 inch.

    The small section on axes has a great part on different kinds of woods and their qualities and many more small sections that are a great wealth of knowledge.
     
  8. sdjsdj

    sdjsdj Guide Bushclass I

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    The thing I like about Kephart is all the time he dedicates to cooking, food, recipes. IMHO, this is an overlooked part of the "backwoodsman's skills". Eating freeze dried meals and highly processed foods is expensive and not the most healthy thing for you.
    Kephart gives good alternatives. I know that those staples are heavy, but cooking is a skill and should be learned well.
     
  9. snapper

    snapper Scout

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    For what it's worth, I tend to see the Nessmuk books as telling you his adventures more than anything else. You can certainly glean a lot of information along the way but he originally wrote for early outdoor magazines. He was much more of a storyteller than educator.

    Just my opinion and thoughts. As a friend of mine says, other's mileage may vary.

    That's all for now. Take care and until next time...Be well.

    snapper
     
  10. joe305

    joe305 Guide

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    I agree with what everyone else has said about Kephart's book being more instructional and Skab is right that sucker is like 3" thick. I think Kephart also comes at it a different way and really connects with the reader.

    You really have to read them for your self to understand!!
     
  11. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

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    There is a lot of difference.Nessmuk/ Sears was an itinerant wanderer and experimenter who had a poetic streak. He wrote well.

    Kephart was a good writer, a librarian by training, who actually practiced a lot of woodcraft skills, and his book (actually 2 volumes in one) was based on practical articles he had written for the outdoor magazines. His work evolved from a 1906 edition to a 1910 , and then 1918 and 1921 editions.

    Every kid should have a copy of Kephart to start their own learning process. Get it,you will see.
     
  12. 8thsinner

    8thsinner Guide Bushclass I

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    There is a digital version of Kephart somewhere, I found it a few years ago after searching for a few, but I have no idea where now...

    I have a digital Sear's and had a paperback kephart. I prefer kephart but may also be slightly biased on the tactile feel of paper in the case too..
    His reading style is much more enjoyable both as a historical manual, it's comedic value, instructional use and a few other things I just can't put my finger on.

    But as it's been said, you can't really have one without the other so get both.
     
  13. Skab

    Skab Staff Staff Member Super Moderator Vendor Bushclass I Bushclass Instructor

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    Here is one, you can also download for free, but this one is streaming

    http://archive.org/stream/campingwoodcraft00kephrich#page/n5/mode/2up
     
  14. CongoChris

    CongoChris Scout

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    Google books has the kephart as well which you can download in epub. If you have a kindle you'll need to convert it to a mobi file. I usually use Calibre for that.
     
  15. dRobinson

    dRobinson Supporter Supporter

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    Thanks for the references to the Kephart book online. Is there any way to download the book to your local machine [ i.e. PDF]. Thanks again!

    EDIT - found the PDF on archive.org
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2012
  16. rdraider

    rdraider Guide

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    I got both of them form the library on here. Both good reads, Nessmuk was a little harder to read. Mainly because he was from an older era. And like others have said, Kephart is much more in depth and a better read in my opinion. But when it comes to reading, read both. You'll glean things from both.
     
  17. usnvet9397

    usnvet9397 Tracker

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    Thanx guys, I'll take all your suggestions into consideration
     
  18. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

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    Last edited: May 4, 2012
  19. jw2n

    jw2n Tinder Gatherer

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    Of the authors mentioned so far I think Angiers Skills for Taming the Wilds is the most informative. It is dated in some areas but if you combine it with the three dozen other books he published you have quite a package. In his later works he concentrated more on homesteading thou.
     
  20. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

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    Hmm, respectfully have to disagree. Kepharts book is , in my experience, a lot more detailed and complete, and covers a lot of different areas of camping and woodcraft.

    Not putting Angier down, but he is known to have written some ideas from less than first hand knowledge. :)
     
  21. Seeker

    Seeker Woods Bum Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    Took me the longest time to be able to remember which was which. Yes, i've read both (they are on my bedside bookshelf, with about 10 other classic old timey woods writer's books), and re-read them frequently.

    Sears was an interesting little dude. He seems to have spent a lot of time canoeing the Adirondacks from one hotel to the next. I'm not sure he regularly spent more than a couple nights out at a time before restocking at the next hotel, cleaning up, submitting his stories by mail, and moving out again. Kinda like an AT Thru-hiker hits town every few days for a shower and more food. nothing wrong with it, just saying i think that's what he did, mostly. his pack and canoe (16lbs and 10 lbs, respectively) are light, but he was little (5-?, about 100 lbs, and had tuberculosis). i've seen his canoes in the adirondack museum in blue mtn lake, NY. tiny. but they worked for him. he also writes about a weeklong trek that ended up taking 10 days. i'm sure he was a competent woodsman, but i think his writing duties created a slightly idyllic legacy.

    Kephart was also an interesting guy. He was a trained librarian by trade, but there's a suspicion his wife fooled around on him, and he wouldn't live with her. an alternate theory is that his drinking may have caused the rift. in any case, kephart spent a lot of years living by himself in the smokies, experimenting with things, living what he wrote about in all seasons (not just ny summers), and in general contributing a great deal of useful information to the sporting community.

    I personally find Kephart's "Camping and Woodcraft" to be the more useful of the two books.

    Warren Miller, Edward Breck, Claude Fordyce, Steward White, GO Shields, Robert Pinkerton, and Dillon Wallace are also good authors, if you like the older stuff... some of it's kinda quaint, but it's interesting reading to me.

    Oh. and i liked Gould's book too.
     

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