Carpenters Hatchet

Discussion in 'Edged Tools' started by caleath, Sep 13, 2011.

  1. caleath

    caleath Guide

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    I found a hatchet in some stuff someone gave me. I did some research and found out its a carpenters hatchet. Hammer on one end and hatchet on the other. Its USA made and I think it will make a great bush tool. Anyone else use one for bushcraft?
     
  2. upthecreek

    upthecreek Guide

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  3. smokewalker

    smokewalker Guide

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    That is my poor mans Tomahawk
     
  4. Old Philosopher

    Old Philosopher Banned Member Banned

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    I like the balance of those more than a "conventional" hatchet.
     
  5. Ahnkochee

    Ahnkochee Bushmaster

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    I've had mines for over 30, and 20 years, used it countless times on Haole Koa trees.
    [​IMG]
     
  6. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

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    Yep, they make excellent wood working tools.
     
  7. Sawdust and Splinters

    Sawdust and Splinters Scout Bushclass I

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    I like the old style much better than the newer style for the bushcrafting. I do have a newer eastwing, but that only comes out for roof work, just doesnt work good for bushcrafting.
     
  8. caleath

    caleath Guide

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    Thanks for the replies..mine is a woodings verona. I have other hatchets. One is a Fiskars which works pretty good too.

    Heck this one was free. I will probably leave it in my truck kit.
     
  9. Flag_Mtn_Hkrs

    Flag_Mtn_Hkrs Scout

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    My dad was a carpenter and always brought his out camping. He always called it a "rigging axe". I guess he used it for framing out houses and for splitting shingles on roof work. It sure did split the kindlin in camp.
     
  10. TomcatPC

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    When I was a kid in the 1970s and 1980s, that is the type of hatchet my Dad would bring along whilst camping, and it did double duty for splitting kindling for the fireplace in the basement during the Winter. I now have this hatchet and plan on using it one of these days.
    Mark
     
  11. VaughnT

    VaughnT Banned Member Banned

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    Can't ask for a better tool around the campsite! The only downside is their weight as they are usually heavier than a standard hatchet. But, that's easily remedied when you grind a better angle on the edge.

    Very handy hatchet to have!
     
  12. Pappy Frank

    Pappy Frank Supporter Supporter

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    I have one and like it. I use it a lot when car camping, but if I am going to have to carry things I prefer to use my trail hawk, much lighter.
     
  13. Brute1100

    Brute1100 Scout

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    I have always used these... I agree with the fact that they are heavier and its not always a good weight... But for me as an all around user it gets grabbed more so than just about anything else to do bigger wood working with... But my knife/tool chest isn't very deep... Yet :)

    Live, Laugh, Love. If that doesn't work, Load, Aim and Fire. (repeat as necessary)
     
  14. ewtoutdoors

    ewtoutdoors Guide

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    This "Craftsman" was my grandfathers, not sure how old it is but I remember it back in the early 60's.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  15. grizz

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    i have an old eswing one.... great stuff for camp chores
     
  16. Ahnkochee

    Ahnkochee Bushmaster

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    I wound up reshaping mine into "viking boat axe" shape.

    Before
    [​IMG]

    After
    [​IMG]
     
  17. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Banned Member Banned

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    I use an Estwing Rigger's Axe for all sorts of tasks on the homestead. It's a great multipurpose tool. While the nail puller notch will generally not be handy for pulling nails, it's GREAT for hauling on old wire fencing (including barbed) to keep your hands from getting bit by it.
     
  18. Easy_rider75

    Easy_rider75 Bushwhacker

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    Cool mod on that one


    Like using these old hatchets myself
     
  19. swoody126

    swoody126 Guest

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    hatchet

    carpenter's, rigger's or framer's hatchet

    derned iffin th'aint uh purty good tool to have along...

    as mentioned, above, they do have some heft/weight to them

    and mine hangs out in the p/u tool box

    i've carried a shingler's hatchet w/ a shortened handle, for many years, in my m/c & canoeing kit

    i made a sheath from an old/torn backpacker's closed cell foam mattress & duct tape, that keeps the razor sharp edge from wreaking havoc on the rest of the stuff in the kit

    this website keeps on providing really good information on how folks adapt stuff from one discipline to another, making the creation of the individual's kit much easier, economical & way more personal!!

    many thanks for the ideas

    keep 'em coming

    happy camping
     
  20. The Kid

    The Kid Scout

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    Is a carpenter hatchet the same as a roofing hatchet ?
     
  21. Hawkcreek

    Hawkcreek Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    Last edited: Jun 25, 2012
  22. 320

    320 Tracker

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    hawkcreek is correct.

    supposedly the rigger part of the name came from the guys building wooden oil derricks.
    it seems to be primarily a western usa tool.

    legend has it the guys who became house framers had the blade removed and claws welded on the poll. thus the 22 ounce california (special) framing hammers was born.

    i've seen railroad carpenters using the long handled axe as a fine-adjusting tool.

    i picked up an estwing carpenter's axe decades ago because it was a handsome tool. it's sharp and makes an excellent paring tool. whacks nails with authority as well.

    to be honest i'm more likely to use a hammer and carry a sheathed chisel than drag out the axe.
     
  23. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Banned Member Banned

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    I find the Rigger's Axe great for when I'm out bracing old fences. I can chop one end of the board I'm using into a point on one end then drive it into the ground at an angle before nailing it in place. :)
     
  24. sportsnut777

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    I do. It was my grandfather's before he passed away. Given the type of person he was, my guess is that the thing is somehow engineered to never break, be waterproof, and self-sharpening.
     
  25. claymation

    claymation Tracker

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    That's right. When I was just out'a high school in the '70's, everybody used rigging axes to frame with. We used them for adjusting seating notches on rafters when walking the top plates. Actually, the axes were more of a status symbol then because all the old timers used them. I remember the throwing contests during lunch was the best use for mine. LOL
     
  26. klammer

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    I use one quite a bit around the acreage for fixing fences etc also. Very handy as opposed to mushrooming the head of a regular hatchet.
     
  27. texascarl

    texascarl Tinder Gatherer

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    If my memory serves, Humphrey Bogart uses a riggers axe early in the movie 'Treasure of the Sierra Madre', building oil rigs in Mexico. It's been a while since I've seen the movie, but I remember noticing it.

    I like 'em - I spent some time in the late 60's remodeling a home in the Missouri ozarks, it was built w/white oak lumber milled from the farm 40 years earlier. That oak was hard to nail, so a heavy riggers axe was useful. That summer gave me pretty good forearms.
     
  28. Danjo

    Danjo Scout

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    When I was framing, a lot of framers used the hatchets (80's). Even those of us who used claw hammers never pulled nails with them, we used a catspaw instead to save the handles.
     
  29. RocketBoy

    RocketBoy Scout

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    Very interesting thread. After 60 cycles around the Sun, I've just now begun to learn about the different patterns of Axes and their intended purposes. I've seen numerous styles and never really understood why some had little notches on the bottom of the Head (nail puller) or why some had a hammer on the back (Shingle Axe or Carpenter's Axe). The large 'Gull Wing' hewing Axes are a good example. If there weren't a resurgence in hand crafted log homes, no one would know what a 'Hewing Axe' is. This is all fascinating to me.

    I'm a life-long knife guy. Ever since my Boy Scout days Axes have always been a utility tool for splitting kindling, making a tent peg or felling the occasional tree. Nothing too specialized. Boy was I wrong.

    Recently, I began to get interested in Bowl and spoon carving in the old Scandinavian method. During my research I discovered just how diverse a class of tool Axes really are. Each culture added their unique style to what is essentially a sharpened wedge on a stick.

    The history of the Axe is also intriguing. Historians and Archaeologists are still split (pun intended:1:) as to whether or not the Axe began as a weapon or a utility tool around the campfire. Regardless of the original intent, it evolved into both. And here we are today, tens of thousands of years later, the Axe is still in it's same basic form. Design perfection.

    Sorry for the long-winded response.

    BTW, this is my 10th response.

    RB
     
  30. SilverFox

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    I have a "carpenters" hatchet that has been used for camping for around 30yrs. Great all in one tool. One thing I did that makes it work better for me is replacing the shorter handle with an 18" to 20" handle. It splits small wood great and can be used as a wedge for larger stuff. The only negative is the handle can't easily be replaced in the field. Otherwise its worth the extra weigh. I strap mine to a day pack for hunting trips and day hikes..
     

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